Billy Preston, Legend “Nothing from Nothing” – dies 59

William Everett "Billy" Preston (September 2, 1946 – June 6, 2006) was an American soul musician from Houston, Texas, raised mostly in Los Angeles, California. In addition to his successful, Grammy-winning career as a solo artist, Preston collaborated with some of the greatest names in the music industry, including the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, Nat King Cole, Little Richard, Eric Burdon, Ray Charles, George Harrison, Elton John, Eric Clapton, Bob Dylan, Sam Cooke, King Curtis, Sammy Davis Jr., Sly Stone, Aretha Franklin, the Jackson 5, Quincy Jones, Richie Sambora, and Red Hot Chili Peppers. He played the Fender Rhodes electric piano and the Hammond organ on the Get Back sessions in 1969.

Preston is the only non-Beatle to receiving billing as an artist alongside the Beatles (as distinct from receiving credit as a session musician on album packaging) on an official Beatles record release. The label of the Get Back single credits the artists on the record as "The Beatles with Billy Preston".

Death of Billy Preston
Billy Preston had battled kidney disease in his later years, brought on by his hypertension. He received a kidney transplant in 2002, but his health continued to deteriorate. He died on June 6, 2006 in Scottsdale, Arizona, of complications of malignant hypertension that resulted in kidney failure and other complications. He had voluntarily entered a drug rehabilitation clinic in Malibu, Calif., and suffered pericarditis there, leading to respiratory failure that left him in a coma since November 21, 2005.[5] His funeral was held on June 20 at the Faithful Central Bible Church in Inglewood, California. Preston was interred at Inglewood Park Cemetery, Inglewood, California.

Billy Preston – Nothing from nothing 1975

Billy Preston’s discography on next page

Billy Preston Discography

Albums
(1965) The Most Exciting Organ Ever
(1965) Early Hits of’65
(1966) The Wildest Organ in Town
(1967) Club Meeting
(1969) That’s The Way God Planned It
(1970) Encouraging Words
(1971) I Wrote a Simple Song
(1972) Music Is My Life
(1973) Everybody Likes Some Kind of Music
(1974) Live European Tour 1973 featuring Mick Taylor on guitar (CD release A&M, 2002)
(1974) The Kids and Me
(1975) It’s My Pleasure
(1976) Billy Preston
(1977) A Whole New Thing
(1979) Late At Night
(1981) The Way I Am
(1982) Pressin’ On
(1984) On the Air
(1986) You Can’t Keep a Good Man Down
(2001) You and I (featuring the Italian band "Novecento")
(2004) The Wildest Organ in Town (Re-released on Stateside Records)

Gospel albums
(1962) Sixteen Years Old Soul
(1965) Hymns Speak from the Organ
(1973) Gospel In My Soul (Re-edition of Hymns Speak from the organ)
(1978) Behold!
(1980) Universal Love
(1994) Ministry of Music
(1995) Minister of Music
(1996) Words and Music
(2001) Music From My Heart

Singles
1969: "That’s the Way God Planned It" – US Pop #62, UK #11
1971: "My Sweet Lord" – US Pop #90, US R&B #23
1972: "I Wrote a Simple Song" – US Pop #77
1972: "Outa-Space" – US Pop #2, US R&B #1, UK #44
1972: "That’s the Way God Planned It" (re-release) – US Pop #65
1972: "Slaughter" – US Pop #50, US R&B #17
1973: "Will It Go Round in Circles" – US Pop #1, US R&B #10
1973: "Space Race" – US Pop #4, US R&B #1
1974: "You’re So Unique" – US Pop #48, US R&B #11
1974: "Nothing from Nothing" – US Pop #1, US R&B #8
1974" "Struttin’" – US Pop #22, US R&B #11
1975: "Fancy Lady" – US Pop #71, US R&B #11
1977: "Wide Stride" – US R&B #33
1978: "Get Back" – US Pop #86
1979: "With You I’m Born Again" (with Syreeta Wright) – US Pop #4, UK #2
1980: "One More Time for Love" (with Syreeta Wright) – US Pop #52
1982: "I’m Never Gonna Say Goodbye" – US Pop #88

As a guest/session performer
(1963) Night Beat (Sam Cooke)
(1969) Get Back and Don’t Let Me Down (The Beatles)
(1970) All Things Must Pass (George Harrison)
(1970) John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band, piano on "God" (John Lennon)
(1971) Sticky Fingers (Rolling Stones)
(1971) The Concert for Bangla Desh (George Harrison And Friends)
(1971) There’s a Riot Goin’ On (Sly & the Family Stone)
(1971) Live at Fillmore West (King Curtis & Aretha Franklin)
(1971) Barbara Joan Streisand, Billy plays keyboards, drums
(1972) Exile on Main Street (Rolling Stones)
(1972) Wind of Change, Billy plays piano, keyboards, harpsichord, accordion (Peter Frampton)
(1973) Ringo, organ on "I’m The Greatest"
(1973) Goats Head Soup (Rolling Stones)
(1974) Goodnight Vienna, clavinet on the title track, electric piano on "Only You (And You Alone)"
(1974) It’s Only Rock’n Roll (Rolling Stones)
(1975) "You Are So Beautiful" (Joe Cocker’s biggest hit)
(1975) "Blood on the Tracks" (Bob Dylan)
(1976) Thirty Three & 1/3 (George Harrison)
(1976) Black and Blue (Rolling Stones)
(1978) Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (also acted the part "Sgt. Pepper" in the film)
(1981) Tattoo You (Rolling Stones)
(1986) "Great Gosh A’Mighty (Been A Long Time Comin’)" (co-written with Little Richard – from the hit motion picture ‘Down And Out in Beverly Hills’. Little Richard – vocal.)
(1990) Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band (Billy plays keyboards and vocals)
(1990) Giovani Jovanotti (Jovanotti) (Billy plays keyboards & Fender Rhodes)
(1991) …E La Vita Continua (Nino D’Angelo)
(1996) "Voyage of Dreams" – Jephté Guillaume and the Tet Kale Orkestra (Billy plays Organ, Strings on Al Di Yo, Go Tell Them, Kanpe, Get Up)
(1997) Bridges to Babylon (Rolling Stones)
(1998) Undiscovered Soul (Richie Sambora)
(2000) The Harsh Light of Day (Fastball) (Billy played keyboards on "You’re An Ocean")
(2001) Songs From The West Coast – Elton John ("Electric organ" on "I Want Love", "The Wasteland"; "Love Her Like Me")
(2001) Reptile (Eric Clapton)
(2001) One More Car, One More Rider (Eric Clapton, live) –DVD includes live performance of Will It Go Round in Circles
(2003) The Colored Section (Donnie) (Billy plays Hammond B3 on the last track: "The Colored Section")
(2003) Concert for George — including Isn’t It a Pity and My Sweet Lord
(2003) Get Born (Jet)
(2004) Me and Mr. Johnson (Eric Clapton) (also appears in the DVD companion Sessions for Robert J)
(2004) Eric Clapton: Crossroads Guitar Festival (Eric Clapton)
(2004) Genius Loves Company (Ray Charles)
(2005) 12 Songs (Neil Diamond)
(2005) Back Home (Eric Clapton)
(2005) Choose Love (Ringo Starr)
(2005) The Concert for Bangladesh (George Harrison and Friends) (Re-mastered version & video)
(2006) Stadium Arcadium (Red Hot Chili Peppers) (on "Warlocks")
(2006) The Road to Escondido (J. J. Cale and Eric Clapton)

 

Paul Gleason, actor (Principal from Breakfast Club) – dies 67

Breakfast Club dead actorPaul Xavier Gleason (May 4, 1939 – May 27, 2006) was an American film and television actor.

Death of Paul Gleason
Gleason died on May 27, 2006 at a Burbank, California hospital from mesothelioma, a form of lung cancer connected with asbestos, which he is thought to have contracted from asbestos exposure on building sites while working for his father as a teenager

Career
Gleason starred in many movies, and became well-known initially as Dr. David Thornton on All My Children, playing the role from 1976 to 1978. He is perhaps best remembered for his role as Richard Vernon, the gruff disciplinary principal in the seminal 1985 movie The Breakfast Club. He reprised versions of that character several times, including in an A*Teens music video, on the television show Boy Meets World (although he was a dean on BMW) and in the films Johnny Be Good and Not Another Teen Movie. As a bookend to his modern fame as strict disciplinarian, Gleason played a tough yet forgiving and nurturing professor to the lead character in Van Wilder.

Gleason is known to Star Wars fans for his role as Jeremitt Towani in the 1985 made-for-TV film The Battle for Endor. He played the villainous Clarence ‘Mr’ Beeks in the famous 1983 comedy Trading Places starring Dan Aykroyd and Eddie Murphy. He also played Deputy Police Chief Dwayne T Robinson, the blowhard police official in Die Hard.

June Pointer (Pointer Sisters) dies 52

June Antoinette Pointer Whitmore (November 30, 1953 – April 11, 2006) was an American Pop/R&B singer and was a founding member of the vocal group The Pointer Sisters.

Death of June Pointer
June died at 1:10pm on April 11, 2006 at the UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles, California from bone cancer, liver cancer, and lung cancer. She died in the arms of her older sisters and brothers Ruth, Anita, Aaron, and Fritz.

Struggling with drug addiction for much of her career, June was ousted from the Pointer Sisters by 2004 as her sisters hoped and waited for her to become drug-free. Ruth’s daughter filled in for June during stage performances.

Casper Weinberger, US Secretary of Defense under Reagan (88)

Caspar Willard "Cap" Weinberger (August 18, 1917- March 28, 2006), was an American politician and Secretary of Defense under President Ronald Reagan from January 21, 1981, until November 23, 1987, making him the third longest-serving defense secretary to date, after Robert McNamara and Donald Rumsfeld. He is also known for his roles in the Strategic Defense Initiative program and the Iran-Contra Affair.

Death of Casper Weinberger
While residing on Mount Desert Island, Maine, Weinberger was treated for and died from complications of pneumonia at Eastern Maine Medical Center in Bangor. He was eighty-eight years of age.

Buck Owens, Country Legend, Hee Haw Co-host, dies 76

Alvis Edgar "Buck" Owens, Jr., (August 12, 1929 – March 25, 2006) was an American singer and guitarist, with 20 number-one hits on the Billboard country music charts. Both as a solo artist and with his legendary band, the Buckaroos. Buck Owens and the the Buckaroos pioneered what has come to be called the Bakersfield sound — a reference to Bakersfield, California, the city Owens called home and from which he drew inspiration for what he preferred to call "American Music

Death of Buck Owens
Buck Owens died in his sleep of an apparent heart attack on March 25, 2006, only hours after performing at his Crystal Palace restaurant, club and museum in Bakersfield. He had successfully recovered from oral cancer in the early 1990s, but had additional health problems near the end of the 1990s and the beginning of the 21st century, including pneumonia and a minor stroke suffered in 2004. These health problems had forced him to curtail his regular weekly performances with the Buckaroos at his Crystal Palace.

Buck Owens – Crying Time Again

Maureen Stapleton – Actress, Award Magnet, dies 80

Lois Maureen Stapleton (June 21, 1925 – March 13, 2006) was an Academy Award-, Emmy- and two-time Tony Award-winning American actress in film, theater and television. She was also elected to the American Theatre Hall of Fame.

Death of Maureen Stapleton
Maureen Stapleton suffered from anxiety and alcoholism for many years and once told an interviewer, "The curtain came down and I went into the vodka." She also said that her unhappy childhood contributed to her insecurities. In 2006, Maureen Stapleton, who was a heavy smoker, died of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at her home in Lenox, Massachusetts, at the age of 80

A Tribute to Maureen Stapleton

Maureen Stapleton’s awards & filmography continues next page

Academy Awards

Best Supporting Actress
1981 Reds

BAFTA Awards
Best Supporting Actress 1982 Reds

Emmy Awards
Outstanding Lead Actress – Miniseries/Movie 1968 Among the Paths to Eden

Golden Globe Awards
Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture 1971 Airport

Tony Awards
Best Leading Actress in a Play 1971 The Gingerbread Lady
Best Featured Actress in a Play 1951 The Rose Tattoo

Maureen Stapleton – Filmography

1958 All the King’s Men TV; Nominated – Emmy Award
Lonelyhearts Nominated – Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated – BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role
Nominated – Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture
1959 The Fugitive Kind  
1961 Vu du pont aka A View from the Bridge
1963 Bye Bye Birdie  
1967 Among the Paths to Eden TV; Emmy Award
1969 Truman Capote’s Trilogy Reprise of Emmy winning 1967 role
1970 Airport Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture
Nominated – Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress
1971 Plaza Suite Nominated – Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture
Summer of ’42 Voice (Uncredited)
1972 Dig  
1974 Voyage to Next Voice
1975 Queen of the Stardust Ballroom Nominated – Emmy Award
1977 The Gathering Nominated – Emmy Award
1978 Interiors Nominated – Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated – Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture
1979 The Runner Stumbles  
Lost and Found  
1981 Reds Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress
BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role
Nominated – Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture
The Fan  
On the Right Track  
1984 Johnny Dangerously  
1985 Cocoon  
1986 Heartburn  
The Cosmic Eye Voice
The Money Pit  
1987 Nuts  
Made in Heaven  
Sweet Lorraine  
1988 Liberace: Behind the Music TV
The Thorns TV series
Doin’ Time on Planet Earth  
Cocoon: The Return  
1989 B.L. Stryker Nominated – Emmy Award
1992 Lincoln TV, voice
Miss Rose White Nominated – Emmy Award
1994 Trading Mom  
The Last Good Time  
1995 Road to Avonlea Nominated – Emmy Award
1996 My Universe Inside Out Voice
1997 Addicted to Love  
1998 Wilbur Falls  
2003 Living and Dining

Slobodan Milosevic, President of Serbia, found dead 64

slobodan milosevicSlobodan Milosevic (August 29, 1941, Yugoslavia – March 11, 2006, The Hague, Netherlands) was President of Serbia and of Yugoslavia. He served as the President of Serbia from 1989 until 1997 and as President of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia from 1997 to 2000. He also led the Socialist Party of Serbia from its foundation in 1990.

Death of Slobodan Milosevic
Slobodan Milosevic was found dead in his cell on March 11, 2006, in the UN war crimes tribunal’s detention center, located in the Scheveningen section of The Hague.

Autopsies soon established that Slobodan Milosevic had died of a heart attack. He had been suffering from heart problems and high blood pressure. However, many suspicions were voiced to the effect that the heart attack had been caused or made possible deliberately.

Actor Jack Wild dies 53

Oliver Actor diedJack Wild (September 30, 1952 – March 2, 2006) was an English actor who achieved fame for his roles in both stage and screen productions of the Lionel Bart musical Oliver! with Ron Moody, Shani Wallis and Oliver Reed. For the latter performance (playing the Artful Dodger), he received an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor at the age of 16, but the Oscar went to Jack Albertson for his performance in The Subject Was Roses. Jack Wild appeared with actor Mark Lester in two films: Oliver! (1968) and Melody (1971).

Death of Jack Wild
Wild died on 2 March, 2006, aged 53, after a long battle with oral cancer, which he claimed was caused by his alcoholism and smoking. Diagnosed with the disease in 2000, he underwent surgery in July 2004 and had part of his tongue and both vocal cords removed. Because of this surgery, he had lost his speech and had to communicate through his wife, Clare Harding, whom he had met in a stage production of Cinderella; Jack played one of the ugly stepsisters. He is buried in Toddington Parish Cemetery.

Actor Darren McGavin dies 83

1990 Outstanding Guest Star Comedy Series 

Darren McGavin (born William Lyle Richardson; May 7, 1922 – February 25, 2006) was an American actor best known for playing the title role in the television horror series Kolchak: The Night Stalker, and also his portrayal in the movie A Christmas Story of the grumpy father given to bursts of profanity that he never realizes his son overhears. He also appeared as the tough-talking, funny detective in the TV series Mickey Spillane’s Mike Hammer.

Death of Darren McGavin
Darren McGavin died of natural causes in a Los Angeles-area hospital.
Darren McGavin was 83 year old at the time of his death.

He was buried in Hollywood Forever Cemetery in Los Angeles.

Oh Fudge! – from the movie "A Christmas Story"
Darren McGavin is the father

Darren McGavin Filmography continues on next page

Darren McGavin Filmography

1940-1970
A Song to Remember (1945)
Counter-Attack (1945)
Kiss and Tell (1945)
She Wouldn’t Say Yes (1946)
Fear (1946)
Queen for a Day (1951)
Summertime (1955)
The Man with the Golden Arm (1955)
The Court Martial of Billy Mitchell (1955)
A Word to the Wives (1955)
The Delicate Delinquent (1957)
Beau James (1957)
The Case Against Brooklyn (1958)
Bullet for a Badman (1964)
The Great Sioux Massacre (1965)
Gunsmoke" Joe Bascome (1966)
African Gold (1966)
Mission Mars (1968)
Anatomy of a Crime (1969)
The Challenge (1970)

1971-1990
Mooch Goes to Hollywood (1971)
Mrs. Pollifax – Spy (1971)
Happy Mother’s Day, Love George (1973) (also director and producer)
43: The Richard Petty Story (1974)
B Must Die (1975)
The Demon and the Mummy (1976)
No Deposit, No Return (1976)
Airport ’77 (1977)
Hot Lead and Cold Feet (1978)
Zero to Sixty (1978)
Hangar 18 (1980)
Firebird 2015 AD (1981)
A Christmas Story (1983)
The Natural (1984)
Turk 182 (1985)
Flag (1986)
Raw Deal (1986)
From the Hip (1987)
Dead Heat (1988)
In the Name of Blood (1990)

1991-1999
Captain America (1991)
Blood and Concrete (1991)
Perfect Harmony (1991)
Happy Hell Night (1992)
Billy Madison (1995)
Still Waters Burn (1996)
Small Time (1996)
Pros and Cons (1999)

Television work
Crime Photographer (1951 – 1952)
Alfred Hitchcock Presents (1955. Episode 13 : The Cheney Vase)
Mickey Spillane’s Mike Hammer (1956 – 1959)
Riverboat (1959 – 1961)
The Legend of Jud Starr (1967)
Custer, ABC series with Wayne Maunder (1967)
Mission: Impossible (1967)
The Outsider (1967) (pilot episode)
The Outsider (1968 – 1969)
The Forty-Eight Hour Mile (1970)
The Challenge (1970)
The Challengers (1970)
Berlin Affair (1970)
Tribes (1970)
Banyon (1971) (pilot episode)
The Death of Me Yet (1971)
The Night Stalker (1972)
Something Evil (1972)
The Rookies (1972) (pilot episode)
Here Comes the Judge (1972)
Say Goodbye, Maggie Cole (1972)
The Night Strangler (1973)
The Six Million Dollar Man (1973) (pilot episode)
Kolchak: The Night Stalker (1974 – 1975)
Crackle of Death (1976)
Brinks: The Great Robbery (1976)
Ike: The War Years (1978)
The Users (1978)
A Bond of Iron (1979)
Donovan’s Kid (1979)
Ike (1979) (miniseries)
Not Until Today (1979)
Love for Rent (1979)
Waikiki (1980)
The Martian Chronicles (1980) (miniseries)
Magnum, P.I. (1981)
Freedom to Speak (1982) (miniseries)
Small & Frye (1983) (canceled after six episodes)
The Baron and the Kid (1984)
The Return of Marcus Welby, M.D. (1984)
My Wicked, Wicked Ways: The Legend of Errol Flynn (1985)
The O’Briens (1985) (sitcom pilot)
Tales from the Hollywood Hills: Natica Jackson (1987)
Tales from the Hollywood Hills: A Table at Ciro’s (1987)
Inherit the Wind (1988)
The Diamond Trap (1988)
Murphy Brown (1989)
Around the World in 80 Days (1989) (miniseries)
Kojak: It’s Always Something (1990)
Child in the Night (1990)
By Dawn’s Early Light (1990)
Clara (1991)
Perfect Harmony (1991)
Miracles and Other Wonders (1992–199?)
Mastergate (1992)
The American Clock (1993)
A Perfect Stranger (1994)
Fudge-A-Mania (1995)
Derby (1995)
Touched by an Angel ([1997, guest appearance)
X-Files ([1999, two episodes)

Dennis Weaver, McCloud, died of cancer 81

1959 Gunsmoke6822 Hollywood Blvd 

William Dennis Weaver (June 4, 1924 – February 24, 2006) was an Emmy Award-winning American actor, best known for his work in television, including roles on Gunsmoke, as Marshal Sam McCloud on the NBC police drama McCloud and in Steven Spielberg’s feature-length directorial debut, the cult TV movie Duel in 1971.

Death of Dennis Weaver
Dennis Weaver died of complications from cancer, in Ridgway, Colorado, United States.  Dennis Weaver was 81 year old at the time of his death.

#

Dennis Weaver – Duel (1971)