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Robin Williams, Oscar-Winning Actor, Dies 63

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Robin McLaurin Williams (July 21, 1951 – August 11, 2014) was an American actor and stand-up comedian. Rising to fame with his role as the alien Mork in the TV series Mork & Mindy (1978–1982), Williams went on to establish a successful career in both stand-up comedy and feature film acting. His film career included such acclaimed films as Good Morning, Vietnam (1987), Dead Poets Society (1989), Awakenings (1990), The Fisher King (1991), and Good Will Hunting (1997), as well as financial successes such as Popeye (1980), Hook (1991), Aladdin (1992), Mrs. Doubtfire (1993), Jumanji (1995), The Birdcage (1996), Night at the Museum (2006), and Happy Feet (2006). He also appeared in the video "Don't Worry, Be Happy" by Bobby McFerrin.

Nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actor three times, Williams went on to receive the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance in Good Will Hunting (1997). He also received two Emmy Awards, four Golden Globes, two Screen Actors Guild Awards and five Grammy Awards.

Robin Williams cause of death

Though his publicist would not confirm the reports that the death was suicide. Robin Williams was 63 years old at the time of his death.

Williams was found unconscious in his home in an unincorporated area just outside Tiburon, California, at around 11:55 AM PDT on August 11, 2014, and was pronounced dead at 12:02 PM The Coroner Division of Marin County suspects the death to be suicide by asphyxia, pending investigation. A forensic examination and postliminary toxicology test is scheduled for August 12, 2014. According to his publicist, Williams was "battling severe depression" in the time before his death,

Johnny Winter, Blues legend, dies 70

John Dawson Winter III (February 23, 1944 – July 16, 2014), better known as Johnny Winter, was an American blues guitarist, singer, and producer. Best known for his high-energy blues-rock albums and live performances in the late 1960s and '70s, Winter also produced three Grammy Award-winning albums for blues legend Muddy Waters. After his time with Waters, Winter recorded several Grammy-nominated blues albums. In 1988, he was inducted into the Blues Foundation Hall of Fame and in 2003, he was ranked 63rd in Rolling Stone magazine's list of the "100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time".

Johnny Winter Cause of Death

Cause of death was not released. Johnny Winter remained active until shortly before his death in Zurich, Switzerland, on 16 July 2014. He died in his hotel four days after his last performance, at the Lovely Days Festival in Wiesen, Austria.

Johnny Winter - Be Careful With A Fool

Johnny Winter - Dust My Broom (Live on Letterman)

Bobby Womack, Soul Legend, dies 70

Robert Dwayne "Bobby" Womack (March 4, 1944 – June 27, 2014) was an American singer-songwriter and musician. An active recording artist since the early 1960s, when he started his career as the lead singer of his family musical group the Valentinos and as Sam Cooke's backing guitarist, Womack's career spanned more than 50 years and spanned a repertoire in the styles of R&B, soul, rock and roll, doo-wop, gospel, and country.

Womack wrote and originally recorded the Rolling Stones' first UK No. 1 hit, "It's All Over Now" and New Birth's "I Can Understand It" among other songs. As a singer he is most notable for the hits "Lookin' For a Love", "That's The Way I Feel About Cha", "Woman's Gotta Have It", "Harry Hippie", "Across 110th Street" and his 1980s hit "If You Think You're Lonely Now".

Bobby Womack cause of death

Bobby Womack died on June 27, 2014 at age 70. Though the cause of his death is currently unknown, he suffered diabetes, prostate cancer, heart diseases, colon cancer, pneumonia and Alzheimer's disease.

Bobby Womack - Across 110th Street (BBC Documentary 2013)

Eli Wallach of 'Magnificent Seven,' 'Good, Bad and Ugly' dies 98

emmy winner

Eli Herschel Wallach (December 7, 1915 – June 24, 2014) was an American film, television and stage actor whose career spanned more than six decades, beginning in the late 1940s. Trained in stage acting, which he enjoyed doing most, he became "one of the greatest 'character actors' ever to appear on stage and screen," states TCM, with over 90 film credits. On stage, he often co-starred with his wife, Anne Jackson, becoming one of the best-known acting couples in the American theater.

Wallach received BAFTA Awards, Tony Awards and Emmy Awards for his work, and received an Honorary Academy Award at the 2nd Annual Governors Awards, presented on November 13, 2010.

Eli Wallach cause of death

Eli Wallach died of natural causes on June 24, 2014 in New York.  Eli Wallach was 98 years old at the time of his death.

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly Official Trailer

Eli Wallach is the Bad

The Magnificent Seven - Trailer

Eli Wallach is the leader of the gang (bab guys)

Paul Walker, Actor, 'Fast and Furious', dies 40

paulPaul William Walker IV (September 12, 1973 – November 30, 2013) was an American actor. He became famous in 1999 after his role in the hit film Varsity Blues, but later garnered fame as Brian O'Conner in The Fast and the Furious film series. His other films include Eight Below, Into the Blue, She's All That, and Takers. He appeared on the National Geographic Channel series Expedition Great White.

Paul Walker cause of death

Paul Walker died of auto accident. Paul walker was 40 years old at the time of his death.

On November 30, 2013, at approximately 3:30 p.m. PST, Walker and Roger Rodas , left an event for Walker's charity Reach Out Worldwide for victims of Typhoon Haiyan. Shortly after leaving in Rodas' red 2005 Porsche Carrera GT, the Roger Rodas lost control and crashed into a light pole and tree in Valencia, Santa Clarita, California, and the vehicle burst into flames.

Paul Walker on Fatherhood

Marcia Wallace, 'Simpsons' star, dies 70

1992 Outstanding Voice-Over Performance

marciaMarcia Karen Wallace (November 1, 1942 – October 25, 2013) was an American character actress, comedienne and game show panelist, primarily known for her roles in television situation comedies. She is perhaps best known for her roles as receptionist Carol Kester on the 1970s sitcom The Bob Newhart Show, and as the voice of elementary school teacher Edna Krabappel on the animated series The Simpsons, for which she won an Emmy for Outstanding Voice-Over Performance in 1992.

Marcia Wallace cause of death

On October 25, 2013 Wallace died due to complications from breast cancer. Staff on The Simpsons had reportedly been aware of her illness.

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Edna Krabappel is a fictional character from the animated TV series The Simpsons, who was voiced by Marcia Wallace until her death on October 25, 2013. She is the teacher of Bart Simpson's 4th grade class at Springfield Elementary School, and Ned Flanders's wife in later seasons. Krabappel was the only character Wallace voiced on a regular basis. The show's producers intend to retire the character following Wallace's death.

Edna

Jonathan Winters, Comedy Legend, Dies 87

Hollywood Walk of FameEmmy WinnerGrammy WinnerGrammy WinnerGrammy WinnerGrammy WinnerGrammy WinnerGrammy WinnerGrammy WinnerGrammy WinnerGrammy WinnerGrammy WinnerGrammy Winner

J WJonathan Harshman Winters III (November 11, 1925 – April 11, 2013) was an American comedian, actor and artist.

Beginning in 1960, Winters recorded many classic comedy albums for the Verve Records label. He also had comedy albums released every decade for over 50 years, receiving 11 Grammy Award for Best Comedy Album nominations during his career, and winning the Grammy Award for Best Spoken Comedy Album for Crank(y) Calls in 1996.

Winters has also appeared in hundreds of television show episodes/series and films combined, including eccentric characters on The Steve Allen Show, The Garry Moore Show, The Wacky World of Jonathan Winters (1972–74), Mork & Mindy, Hee Haw and in It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World.

Winters had a dramatic role in the The Twilight Zone episode "A Game of Pool" (episode 3.5 on October 13, 1961)

After voicing Grandpa Smurf on The Smurfs (1986–89) and Papa Smurf in The Smurfs (2011 film), Winters's final feature film was The Smurfs 2 in 2013, which will be dedicated in his memory.

Jonathan Winters was inducted to the Walk of Fame on February 8, 1960 with 1 star.

Jonathan Winters cause of death

Jonathan Winters died on April 11, 2013, in Montecito, California, of natural causes. Jonathan Winters was 87 years old at the time of his death. He is survived by his two children: Jay Winters, and Lucinda Winters.

Jonathan Winters Montage Part 1 - Orinda Film Festival 2003

Joe Weider, bodybuilding & fitness icon, dies 93

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joeJosef Edwin "Joe" Weider (November 29, 1920 – March 23, 2013) was the co-founder of the International Federation of BodyBuilders (IFBB) along with brother Ben Weider and creator of the Mr. Olympia, the Ms. Olympia and the Masters Olympia bodybuilding contests. He was the publisher of several bodybuilding and fitness-related magazines, most notably Muscle & Fitness, Flex, Men's Fitness and Shape, and the manufacturer of a line of fitness equipment and fitness supplements. In 1995, he appeared in the Charlton Heston and Peter Graves film, America: A Call to Greatness, directed by Warren Chaney.

Joe Weider created Weider Nutrition in 1940, considered the first sports nutrition company. Now called Schiff Nutrition International, they were the creators of Tiger's Milk nutrition bars and related products, one of the earliest lines of sports foods.

On Labor Day 2006, California governor and seven times Mr. Olympia winner Arnold Schwarzenegger, a Weider protégé, presented him with the Venice Muscle Beach Hall of Fame's Lifetime Achievement award. Schwarzenegger credited Weider with inspiring him to enter bodybuilding and to come to the United States.

Joe Weider cause of death

Joe Weider died of heart failure on March 23, 2013 at his home in Los Angeles, California.  Joe Weider was 92 years old at the time of his death. He is survived by his wife Betty.

Fran Warren, Big Band Singer, 'Sunday Kind of Love', dies 87

- Late Entry -

Frances Wolfe (March 4, 1926 – March 4, 2013), known by her stage name, Fran Warren, was an American popular singer.

One of the singer's biggest hits was the 1947 "Sunday Kind of Love." Fran Warren was also an actress who appeared in an Abbott and Costello film.

Fran Warren cause of death

Fran Warren died of natural causes in Connecticut on March 4, 2013.  Fran Warren was 87 years old at the time of her death.

Fran Warren - Sunday Kind of Love

"A Sunday Kind of Love" was composed by Barbara Belle, Anita Leonard, Stan Rhodes, and Louis Prima and was published in 1946.  The song was first recorded November 11, 1946. He released the song as a single in January, 1947 and it became permanently identified as the signature song for its vocalist, Fran Warren.

Andy Williams, 'Moon River' Singer, Emmy Winning TV host, dies 84

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Andy WilliamsHoward Andrew "Andy" Williams (December 3, 1927 – September 25, 2012) was an American singer who recorded eighteen Gold and three Platinum-certified albums. He hosted The Andy Williams Show, a TV variety show, from 1962 to 1971, as well as numerous television specials, and owned the Moon River Theatre in Branson, Missouri, named after the song "Moon River", with which he was closely identified.

During the 1960s, Williams became one of the most popular vocalists in the country and was signed to what was at that time the biggest recording contract in history. He was primarily an album artist, and at one time he had earned more gold albums than any solo performer except Frank Sinatra, Johnny Mathis and Elvis Presley. By 1973 he had earned as many as 18 gold album awards. Among his hit albums from this period were Moon River, Days of Wine and Roses (number one for 16 weeks in mid-1963), The Andy Williams Christmas Album, Dear Heart, The Shadow of Your Smile, Love, Andy, Get Together with Andy Williams, and Love Story. These recordings, along with his natural affinity for the music of the 1960s and early 1970s, combined to make him one of the premier easy listening singers of that era.

Henry Mancini and Johnny Mercer's song "Moon River" (1962 Oscar winning song) became Williams' theme song. However, it was never released as a single.  "Moon River" was never actually a chart hit for Williams.

Andy Williams became the star of his own weekly television variety show, The Andy Williams Show (1962 to 1971). He won three Emmy Awards for outstanding variety program.

Williams hosted the most Grammy telecasts, from the 13th Annual Grammy Awards in 1971 through the 19th Annual Grammy Awards in 1977, totaling seven consecutive shows.

Williams was an avid golfer, and hosted the PGA Tour golf tournament in San Diego from 1968–88 at Torrey Pines. Then known as the "Andy Williams San Diego Open", the tournament continues as the Farmers Insurance Open, usually played in February.

Andy Williams cause of death
Andy Williams died at his home in Branson, Missouri after suffering from bladder cancer for a year. Andy Williams was 84 years old at the time of his death.

Andy Williams health history
On Friday, November 4, 2011, it was reported in the press that Williams had been diagnosed with bladder cancer. The singer confirmed the condition in a surprise appearance that weekend at his theater in Branson, as reported by the Branson Tri-Lakes News. He underwent chemotherapy treatments in Houston, Texas and then moved with his wife, Debbie, to a rented home in Malibu, California to be closer to cancer specialists in the Los Angeles area.

On July 19, 2012, Williams's theater announced that Andy Williams had returned to Branson following cancer treatment and was "in good spirits and getting stronger every day" and had hoped to take the stage as scheduled in September.

Andy Williams - Moon River 1960's performance

Andy Williams - It's The Most Wonderful Time Of The Year

Kitty Wells, first female country music pioneer, dies at 92

grammy

The Queen of Country Music.

Kitty Wells (August 30, 1919 – July 16, 2012), born Ellen Muriel Deason, was an American country music singer. Her 1952 hit recording, "It Wasn't God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels", made her the first female country singer to top the U.S. country charts, and turned her into the first female country star. Her Top 10 hits continued until the mid-1960s, inspiring a long list of female country singers who came to prominence in the 1960s.

Wells ranks as the sixth most successful female vocalist in the history of Billboard's country charts, according to historian Joel Whitburn's book The Top 40 Country Hits, behind Dolly Parton, Loretta Lynn, Reba McEntire, Tammy Wynette, and Tanya Tucker. In 1976, she was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame and is currently its oldest living member. In 1991, she became the third country music artist, after Roy Acuff and Hank Williams, and the eighth woman to receive the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. Wells' accomplishments earned her the nickname The Queen of Country Music.

Kitty Wells cause of death
Kitty Wells died from complications after a stroke.
Kitty Wells was 92 years old at the time of her death

Kitty Wells - It Wasn't God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels

Kitty Wells "I Can't Stop Loving You"

Bob Welch, Former Fleetwood Mac guitarist, 'Ebony Eyes', dies 66

Robert Lawrence "Bob" Welch, Jr. (August 31, 1945 – June 7, 2012) was an American musician. A former member of Fleetwood Mac, Welch had a briefly successful solo career in the late 1970s. His singles included "Hot Love, Cold World", "Ebony Eyes", "Precious Love", and "Sentimental Lady".

Bob Welch cause of death
On June 7, 2012, Welch committed suicide in his Nashville home at around 12:15 p.m. He was found by his wife with a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the chest; a suicide note had been left behind. Welch had suffered from undisclosed health issues prior to his death. Bob Welch was 66 years old at the time of his death

Sentimental Lady - Bob Welch

Doc Watson, Folk-Music Legend, Dies 89

Arthel Lane "Doc" Watson (March 3, 1923 – May 29, 2012) was an American guitar player, songwriter and singer of bluegrass, folk, country, blues and gospel music. Watson won seven Grammy awards as well as a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. Watson's flatpicking skills and knowledge of traditional American music are highly regarded. He performed with his son Merle for over 15 years until Merle's death in 1985, in an accident on the family farm.

Doc Watson cause of death
In late May 2012, Watson was listed in critical condition but was responsive at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, after undergoing colon surgery. Watson had fallen early in the week. Watson did not break any bones, but an underlying condition prompted the surgery. Doc Watson was 89 years old at the time of his death.

Doc Watson-Deep River Blues

Mike Wallace , '60 Minutes', Broadcasting legend dies 93



Mike Wallace won at least 20 Emmy Awards

Myron Leon "Mike" Wallace (May 9, 1918 – April 7, 2012) was an American journalist, game show host, actor, and media personality. During his career, which spanned over sixty years, he interviewed a wide range of prominent newsmakers.

He was one of the original correspondents for CBS' 60 Minutes which debuted in 1968. Wallace retired as a regular full-time correspondent in 2006, but still appeared occasionally on the series until 2008.

Wallace's youngest son is journalist Chris Wallace, host of Fox News Sunday.

Mike Wallace cause of death
Cause of death is not released.
Mike Wallace died in Connecticut, where he resided, at 8 p.m. on April 7, 2012.
Mike Wallace was 93 years old at the time of his death.

Health
Mike Wallace wore pacemaker for over 20 years.  He had a long history of cardiac care and underwent triple bypass heart surgery in January 2008.

Mike Wallace interviews Bette Davis (1980)

Dan Wheldon, Indy 500 champion, dies after crash 33

Daniel Clive "Dan" Wheldon (June 22, 1978 – October 16, 2011) was an English auto racing driver. He was the 2005 Indy Racing League IndyCar Series champion, and winner of the Indianapolis 500 in 2005 and 2011. Wheldon died during a racing accident at Las Vegas Motor Speedway on 16 October 2011, at the age of 33.

Dan Wheldon cause of death
DeathAt the 2011 IZOD IndyCar Series season finale at Las Vegas Motor Speedway on 16 October 2011, Wheldon was involved in a 15-car accident during lap 11 of the race. The massive pile-up resulted in a red flag. Wheldon had to be extricated from his car and was airlifted to a local hospital with what were described as "serious injuries." He subsequently succumbed to his injuries. He was 33 years old.

Dan Wheldon's Last Tweet Before Race

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