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Arnold Stang, Comic & Voice Actor for Six Decades Dies 91

Arnold Stang (September 28, 1918 – December 20, 2009) was an American comic actor who played a small and bespectacled, yet brash and knowing big-city type.

In films, he played Sparrow in The Man with the Golden Arm (1955) with Frank Sinatra and Kim Novak. In It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World (1963) he played Ray, who along with his partner Irwin (played by Marvin Kaplan), owns a gas station that is destroyed by Jonathan Winters. He appeared in Hello Down There (1969). In one of the oddest movie pairings, he partnered with Arnold Schwarzenegger (billed as "Arnold Strong") in the latter's first film, the camp classic Hercules in New York (1970).

As a voice actor for animated cartoons, Stang provided the voice for Popeye's pal Shorty (a caricature of Stang), Herman the mouse in a number of Famous Studios cartoons, Tubby Tompkins in a few Little Lulu shorts, the famous Hanna-Barbera lead character Top Cat (modeled explicitly on Phil Silvers's Sgt. Bilko), and Catfish on Misterjaw. He also provided many extra voices for the Cartoon Network series Courage the Cowardly Dog. On television, he appeared in commercials for the Chunky candy bar, where he would list all of its ingredients, smile and say, "Chunky, what a chunk of chocolate!" He provided the voice of the Honey Nut Cheerios Bee in the 1980s and was also a spokesman for Vicks Vapo-Rub.

Stang appeared on an episode of The Cosby Show with guest star Sammy Davis Jr. In one TV ad he played Luther Burbank, proudly showing off his newly-invented "square tomato" to fit neatly in typical square slices of commercial bread, then being informed that the advertising bakery had beat him to it by producing round loaves of bread. He played the photographer in the 1993 film Dennis the Menace with Walter Matthau.

Death of Arnold Stang
Arnold Stang died of pneumonia in Newton, Massachusetts, on December 20, 2009. Arnold Stang was 91 years old at the time of his death.

Soupy Sales, comedian from the Golden Age of Television, dies 83

Soupy Sales (January 8, 1926 – October 22, 2009) was an American comedian, actor, and radio-TV personality and host. He was best known for his long-running local and network children's television show, Lunch with Soupy Sales; a series of comedy sketches frequently ending with Sales receiving a pie in the face, which became his trademark.

From 1968 to 1975, he was a regular panelist on the syndicated revival of What's My Line? and appeared on several other TV game shows. During the 1980s Sales hosted his own show on WNBC-AM in New York City.

Death of Soupy Sales:
Soupy Sales is died of cancer at Calvary Hospice in the Bronx.
Soupy Sales was 83 years old at the time of his death

'Dirty Dancing' and 'Ghost' Star Patrick Swayze Dies 57

 

Patrick SwayzePatrick Wayne Swayze (August 18, 1952 - September 14, 2009) was an American actor, dancer and singer-songwriter. He was best-known for his roles as romantic leading men in the films Dirty Dancing and Ghost and as Orry Main in the North and South television miniseries. He was listed by People magazine as its "Sexiest Man Alive" in 1991.

Health and death of Patrick Swayze
Swayze was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in late January 2008, and underwent chemotherapy and other treatments at the Stanford University Medical Center. On March 5, 2008, a Reuters article reported that Swayze "has a very limited amount of disease, and he appears to be responding well to treatment thus far". Swayze's doctor confirmed that the actor was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, but insisted he was not as close to death as reports suggest. Specifically, Swayze was diagnosed with a type of pancreatic tumor called Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm (IPMN).

Swayze acknowledged that his chain smoking probably "had something to do with" the development of his disease. Research has shown a link between cigarette smoking and the development of cancer of the pancreas. Swayze died on September 14, 2009, at age 57.

Patrick Swayze - She's Like the Wind

Eunice Shriver, sister of JFK, mother of Maria Shriver, dies 88

Eunice Mary Kennedy Shriver (July 10, 1921- August 11, 2009) was a member of the Kennedy family and helped to found Special Olympics in the 1960s as a national organization. Born in Brookline, Massachusetts, she was the fifth of nine children of Joseph P. Kennedy, Sr. and Rose Kennedy.

Shriver actively campaigned for her elder brother, U.S. President John F. Kennedy, during his successful 1960 U.S. presidential election.

In 1968, she helped Ann McGlone Burke nationalize the Special Olympics movement and is the only woman to have her portrait appear, during her lifetime, on a U.S. coin – the 1995 commemorative Special Olympics silver dollar.

Her daughter, Maria Shriver, is married to actor and politician Arnold Schwarzenegger who is currently Governor of California (elected 2003).

Death of Eunice Shriver
In the early morning of August 11, 2009, Shriver died at Cape Cod Hospital in Hyannis, Massachusetts. The immediate cause of her death has not yet been disclosed, but she was 88 years of age and had suffered from Addison's Disease for many years. The news of her death was first broadcast on MSNBC's morning show Morning Joe, following an e-mail to Time magazine guest Mark Halperin

* Comment closed (for people of politics)

Folk Singer and Scholar Mike Seeger Dies 75

Mike Seeger (August 15, 1933 – August 7, 2009) was an American folk musician and folklorist. He was a distinctive singer and an accomplished musician who played autoharp, banjo, fiddle, dulcimer, guitar, mouth harp, mandolin, and dobro. Seeger, a half-brother of Pete Seeger, produced more than 30 documentary recordings, and performed in more than 40 other recordings. He desired to make known the caretakers of culture that inspired and taught him

Seeger received six Grammy nominations and was the recipient of four grants from the National Endowment for the Arts. His influence on the folk scene was described by Bob Dylan in his autobiography, Chronicles: Volume One.

Death of Mike Seeger
A week before his 76th birthday, Seeger died at his home in Lexington, Virginia on August 7, 2009, after stopping cancer treatment

Gale Storm, singer, star of '50s hit TV series, dies 87

 

Josephine Owaissa Cottle (April 5, 1922 - June 27, 2009), better known as Gale Storm, is an American actress and singer, who starred in two popular television programs of the 1950s, My Little Margie and The Gale Storm Show.

Television & Music Career
Storm's television career skyrocketed from 1952 to 1955, with her starring role in My Little Margie. The show was originally a summer replacement for I Love Lucy. It ran for 126 episodes.

Storm's popularity was capitalized upon in The Gale Storm Show (aka Oh! Susanna).  This show ran for 143 episodes between 1956 and 1960. Both of her series were shown countless times in reruns.

Gale Storm had several top ten songs. She headlined in Las Vegas and appeared in numerous stage plays.

Death of Gale Storm
Storm lived alone in Monarch Beach, California, near her two sons and their families, until failing health in recent years forced her into a convalescent home in Danville, California.  Cause of death is not known.
Gale Storm was 87 years old at the time of her death

I Hear You Knocking Gale Storm

 Gale Storm - Ivory Tower

Gale Storm's Filmography & Discography continues on next page

Filmography
Murder, She Wrote (1 episode, 1989)
The Love Boat (1 episode, 1979)
Burke's Law (2 episodes, 1964-1965)
The Gale Storm Show (83 episodes, 1956-1960)
Shower of Stars (1 episode, 1957)
What's My Line? 11/17/1975 (Episode #388) (Season 9 Ep 12)Mystery Guest
The Ford Television Theatre (1 episode, 1955)
Celebrity Playhouse (1 episode, 1955)
Robert Montgomery Presents (1 episode, 1955)
My Little Margie (76 episodes, 1952-1955)
The Unexpected (1 episode, 1952)
Woman of the North Country (1952)
The Texas Rangers (1951)
Al Jennings of Oklahoma (1951)
The Bigelow Theatre (2 episodes, 1950-1951)
Hollywood Theatre Time (1950) TV series
Between Midnight and Dawn (1950)
The Underworld Story (1950)
Curtain Call at Cactus Creek (1950)
The Kid from Texas (1950)
Abandoned (1949)
Stampede (1949)
Walk a Crooked Mile (1948)
The Dude Goes West (1948)
It Happened on 5th Avenue (1947)
Swing Parade of 1946
Sunbonnet Sue (1945)
G.I. Honeymoon (1945)
Forever Yours (1945)
Where Are Your Children? (1943)
Campus Rhythm (1943)
Nearly Eighteen (1943)
Revenge of the Zombies (1943)
Cosmo Jones, Crime Smasher (1943)
Rhythm Parade (1942)
Foreign Agent (1942)
Smart Alecks (1942)
Lure of the Islands (1942)
Man from Cheyenne (1942)
Freckles Comes Home (1942)
Red River Valley (1941)
Jesse James at Bay (1941)
Let's Go Collegiate (1941
Gambling Daughters (1941)
Saddlemates (1941)
City of Missing Girls (1941)
Merry-Go-Roundup (1941)
Uncle Joe (1941)
One Crowded Night (1940)
Tom Brown's School Days (1940)

Recordings

Singles
1956: I Hear You Knocking/Never Leave Me (Dot 15412) (#2)
1956: Memories Are Made of This/Teenage Prayer (Dot 15436)
1956: Why Do Fools Fall in Love/I Walk Alone (Dot 15448)
1956: I Ain't Gonna Worry/Ivory Tower (Dot 15458) (#6)
1956: Tell Me Why/Don't Be That Way (Dot 15474)
1956: Now Is The Hour/A Heart Without A Sweetheart (Dot 15492)
1956: My Heart Belongs To You/Orange Blossoms (Dot 15515)
1957: Lucky Lips/On Treasure Island (Dot 15539)
1957: Dark Moon/A Little Too Late (Dot 15558) (#4)
1957: On My Mind Again/Love By The Jukebox Light (Dot 15606)
1957: Go 'Way From My Window/Winter Warm (Dot 15666)
1957: I Get That Feeling/A Farewell To Arms (Dot 15691)
1957: You/Angry (Dot 15734)
1957: South Of The Border/Soon I'll Wed My Love (Dot 15783 )
1958: Oh Lonely Crowd/Happiness Left Yesterday (Dot 15861)
1960: I Need You So/On Treasure Island (Dot 16057)
1960: Please Help Me I'm Falling/He Is There (Dot 16111)

Singer Dan Seals 'I'd Really Love to See You Tonight' dies 61

Danny Wayland Seals (February 8, 1948 - March 25, 2009) was an American musician. In the 1970s, he was the "England Dan" half of the soft rock duo England Dan and John Ford Coley, who are best known for their hit single "I'd Really Love to See You Tonight". He was also the younger brother of Jim Seals (from the duo Seals & Crofts).

After departing the duo, Seals began a solo career in country music. In his solo career, he released sixteen studio albums and charted more than twenty singles on the country charts. Eleven of his singles reached Number One: "Meet Me in Montana" (with Marie Osmond), "Bop" (also a #42 pop hit), "Everything That Glitters (Is Not Gold)", "You Still Move Me", "I Will Be There", "Three Time Loser", "One Friend", "Addicted", "Big Wheels in the Moonlight", "Love on Arrival", and a cover of Sam Cooke's "Good Times". Four more of Seals' singles also reached Top Ten on the country charts.

Death of Dan Seals
In 2008, Seals completed radiation treatments for lymphoma at Vanderbilt in Nashville and M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston and received a stem cell transplant in late 2008 at NIH in Maryland. Seals died on March 25, 2009 at his daughter's home, following treatment for mantle cell lymphoma.  Dan Seals was 61 years old at the time of his death.

I'd Really Love to See You Tonight (Dan Seals with guitar, left handed)

Tony Winner Ron Silver Dies of Cancer at 62

Ronald Silver (July 2, 1946  - March 15, 2009) was an American actor, director, producer and political activist.

Death of Ron Silver
Ron Silver died of esophageal cancer,  after battling the disease for two years
Ron Silver was 62 years old at the time of his death.

Silver made his film debut in Tunnel Vision in 1976. Additional screen roles include Lovesick (1983), the devoted son of Anne Bancroft in Garbo Talks (1984), an incompetent detective in Eat and Run (1986), and the lead in Paul Mazursky's Oscar-nominated Enemies: A Love Story (1989). He also portrayed defense attorney Alan Dershowitz in Reversal of Fortune (1990), based on the trial of Claus von Bülow.

Silver has been featured in such diverse films as Billy Crystal's Mr. Saturday Night (1992), Timecop (1994) with Jean-Claude Van Damme, and as Muhammad Ali's boxing cornerman Angelo Dundee in Michael Mann's Ali. From 2001 to 2002 and 2005 to 2006, Silver portrayed presidential campaign advisor Bruno Gianelli on The West Wing.

From 1991 to 2000, Silver served as president of the Actors' Equity Association.

Charles Schneer, 50's Film producer dies 88

* Charles Schneer produced the only movie that starred Ronald & Nancy Reagan

Charles H. Schneer (May 5, 1920 - January 21, 2009) was a film producer most widely known for working with special effects pioneer, Ray Harryhausen. He was born in Norfolk, Virginia and died in Boca Raton, Florida.

After studying at Columbia University, he served in the US Army's Signal Corps Photographic Unit. After the war he moved to Hollywood, and after joining Columbia Pictures he was introduced to Ray Harryhausen by a mutual friend from his Army days.

Together they made It Came From Beneath The Sea, about a giant octopus-like creature that wreaks havoc. This film made use of stop-motion photography which the pair were to use to great effect in later films including Jason and the Argonauts, The Golden Voyage of Sinbad and Clash of the Titans.

Schneer also produced the 1967 film version of the stage musical Half A Sixpence starring Tommy Steele

Death of Charles Schneer
Charles Schneer died 88 after a long illness.

Charles Schneer's Filmography continutes on next page

Filmography

Filmography
The Seventh Voyage of Sinbad
First Men in the Moon
The Valley of Gwangi
20 Million Miles to Earth
I Aim at the Stars
Clash of the Titans
Sinbad and the Eye of the Tiger
The Golden Voyage of Sinbad
Mysterious Island
Good Day for a Hanging
It Came from Beneath the Sea
Jason and the Argonauts

Former Grateful Dead keyboardist Merl Saunders dies 74

Merl Saunders (February 14, 1934 – October 24, 2008) was an American multi-genre musician who played piano and keyboards, favoring the Hammond B-3 console organ.

Born in San Mateo, California, Saunders gained notice in the 1970s when he began collaborating with Jerry Garcia, with the Grateful Dead and with Garcia's bands The Legion of Mary and Reconstruction.

Death of Merl Saunders
Merl Saunders died in San Francisco, California on the morning of October 24, 2008, after fighting infections as a result of complications related to the stroke which he suffered in 2002.  Merl Saunders was 74 years old at the time of his death.

Biography
He led his own bands, as Merl Saunders and Friends, playing live dates with Garcia, as well as Mike Bloomfield, David Grisman, Tom Fogerty, Vassar Clements, Kenneth Nash, John Kahn and Sheila E.

He has worked with musicians Paul Pena, Bonnie Raitt, Phish, Miles Davis, and B. B. King. Merl also recorded with The Dinosaurs, a "supergroup" of first-generation Bay Area rock musicians.

Four Tops' Lead Singer Levi Stubbs dies 71

Levi Stubbles (June 6, 1936 - October 17, 2008), better known by the stage name, Levi Stubbs, was an American baritone singer, best known as the lead vocalist of the famed Motown R&B group The Four Tops.

Death of Levi Stubbles
Levi Stubbles died October 17, 2008 at his home in Detroit after a long serious illness including cancer and a stroke -- that forced him to stop performing in 2000. Levi Stubbles was 72 years old at the time of his death

The Four Tops
Stubbs began his professional singing career with friends Abdul "Duke" Fakir, Renaldo "Obie" Benson and Lawrence Payton to form the Four Aims in 1954. Two years later, the group changed their name to the Four Tops. The group began as a supper-club act before finally signing to Motown Records in 1963; by the end of the decade, The Four Tops had over a dozen hits to their name.

Levi Stubbs' biography continues next page

 Four Tops - I'll be there.  Lead singer is Levi Stubbs

The most popular of the Four Tops hits, all of which featured Stubbs on lead vocals, include "Baby I Need Your Loving", "I Can't Help Myself (Sugar Pie, Honey Bunch)", "It's the Same Old Song", "Reach Out I'll Be There", "Standing in the Shadows of Love", "Bernadette", "Still Water (Love)", and "Ain't No Woman (Like the One I've Got)".

Although Stubbs was a natural baritone, most of the Four Tops' hits were written in a tenor range to give the lead vocals a sense of urgency. Stubbs and the other Tops remained a team until Payton died in 1997, at which point Theo Peoples took his place. The Four Tops were elected to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1990. Benson also died on July 1, 2005.

Other work
As an actor, credited as Levi Stubbs, Jr., he provided the voice of the carnivorous plant "Audrey II" in the movie version of the musical, Little Shop of Horrors (1986) and the voice of Mother Brain in the animated TV series Captain N: The Game Master (1989). Stubbs has also guest starred in a number of TV shows as himself.

Personal life
Stubbs and his wife Clineice were married from 1960 until his death, and had five children. In 1995, Stubbs was diagnosed with cancer, and later, a stroke, and therefore stopped touring. Since 2000, Theo Peoples has taken Stubbs' place as the lead singer of The Four Tops, with Ronnie McNeir taking the place that Payton originally held. Stubbs was a cousin of soul singer Jackie Wilson.

Grammy-Winning Singer Jo Stafford Dies at 90

Hollywood Walk of Famer Hollywood Walk of Famer Hollywood Walk of Famer 

Joe StaffordJo Stafford (November 12, 1917 – July 16, 2008), born Jo Elizabeth Stafford, in Coalinga, California, was an American pop singer whose career spanned the late 1930s through the early 1960s. Stafford is greatly admired for the purity of her voice and was considered one of the most versatile vocalists of the era. She was also viewed as a pioneer of modern musical parody, having won a Grammy Award for Best Comedy Album in 1961 (with husband Paul Weston) for their album Jonathan and Darlene Edwards in Paris.

Death of Jo Stafford
Jo Stafford is died of congestive heart failure.
Jo Stafford was 90 years old at the time of her death

I'll be seeting You

You Belong To me

* Jo Stafford's biography & discography continues next page.
* Please share your memory, leave your comment

Albums
Kiss Me, Kate (1949)
Jo Stafford with Gordon MacRae (1949)
Autumn in New York (1950)
Songs for Sunday Evening (1950)
American Folk Songs (1950)
Songs of Faith (1950)
Jo Stafford: Capitol Collectors Series (1950)
As You Desire Me (1952)
Starring Jo Stafford (1953)
Broadway's Best (1953)
New Orleans (1954)
Garden of Prayers (1954)
My Heart's in the Highland (1954)
Soft and Sentimental (1955)
Songs of Scotland (1955)
Memory Songs (1955)
Happy Holiday (1955)
Ski Trails (1956)
A Girl Named Jo (1956)
Once Over Lightly (1957)
Swinging Down Broadway (1958)
Ballad of the Blues (1959)
I'll Be Seeing You (1959)
Jo Stafford's Greatest Hits (1959)
Jo + Jazz (1960)
Music of My Life (1961)
Jonathan and Darlene Edwards in Paris (1961)
Whispering Hope (1962)
The Hits of Jo Stafford (1963)
Peace in the Valley (1963)
Joyful Season (1964)
Getting Sentimental over Tommy Dorsey (1964)
Sweet Hour of Prayer (1964)
This is Jo Stafford (1966)
Do I Hear a Waltz? (1966)
Big Band Sound (1970)
Piano Artistry of Jonathan Edwards (1985)
G.I. Joe (1987)
Broadway Revisited (1987)
You Belong to Me (1989)
America;s Most Versatile Singing Star (1990)
Fabulous Song Stylists (1991)
You'll Never Walk Alone (1992)
Greatest Hits (1993)
Sixteen Most Requested Songs (1995)
The Very Best of Jo Stafford (1995)
Say It's Wonderful (1995)
For You (1995)
Spotlight on Jo Stafford (1996)
Jazz (1996)
Drifting and Dreaming with Jo Stafford (1996)
Jo Stafford Story (1997)
The One and Only (1997)
Walkin' My Baby Back Home (1998)
G.I. Jo Sings the Hits (1998)
Too Marvellous for Words (1998)
Coming Back Like a Song: 25 Hits: 1941-47 (1998)
No Other Love (1998)
Jo Stafford (1940-44 (1998)
Happy Holidays: I Love the Winter Weather (1999)
Jo + Broadway (1999)
Jo + Blues (1999)
Songs of Faith, Hope and Love (1999)
Just Reminicin' (2000)
Jo and Friends (2000)
The Columbia Hits Collection (2001)
Candy (2001)
Haunted Heart (2001)
A–You're Adorable (2001)
International Hits (2001)
Cocktail Hour (2001)
The Magic of Jo Stafford (2001)
My Darling, My Darling (2001)
Jo Stafford on Capital (2001)
Best of the War Years (2001)
The Old Rugged Cross (2001)
The Two of Us (2001)
I Remember You (2002)
The Ultimate Jo Stafford (2002)
The Best of Jo Stafford (2003)
Meet Jo Stafford (2003)
You Belong to Me (2003)
Stars of the Summer Night (2004)
Over the Rainbow (2004)
Alone and Together (2005)
Memories Are Made of These (2005)
Love, Mystery and Adventure (2006)
Sincerely Yours (2006)
This is Gold (2006)
Vintage Years (2006)
All Hits (2006)
Ultimate Capitol Collection (2007)
Jo Stafford and Friends (2007)
Her Greatest Hits (2008)

Notable songs

Solo
"All The Things You Are"
"Allentown Jail"
"Autumn in New York"
"Black Is the Color"
"Day By Day"
"Early Autumn"
"Feudin' and Fightin'"
"Goodnight Irene" 
"Haunted Heart"
"Here I'll Stay"
"I Love You"
"Indiscretion"
"I'll Be Seeing You"
"It Could Happen to You"
"It's Almost Tomorrow"
"Ivy"
"Jambalaya"
 "Keep It a Secret"
"Just One Way to Say I Love You"
"The Last Mile Home"
"Let's Take the Long Way Home"
"Long Ago (And Far Away)"
"Make Love to Me!"
"The Nearness of You"
"No Other Love" 
"On London Bridge"
"Out Of This World"
"Ragtime Cowboy Joe"
"September Song"
"Serenade of the Bells"
"Shrimp Boats"
"Some Enchanted Evening"
"Suddenly There's a Valley"
 "Swingin' On Nothin'"
"Symphony"
"Teach Me Tonight" 
"Thank You for Calling"
"That Sugar Baby O' Mine"
"That's for Me"
"(Now and Then) There's a Fool Such As I"
"There's No You"
"The Things We Did Last Summer"
"White Christmas" 
"Wind in the Willow"
"With a Little Bit of Luck"
"You Belong to Me"

With Frankie Laine
"Back Where I Belong"
"Basin Street Blues"
"Floatin' Down To Cotton Town"
"Goin' Like Wildfire"
"Hey Good Lookin'"
"In the Cool, Cool, Cool of the Evening"
"Pretty-Eyed Baby"
"Settin' The Woods On Fire"
"Way Down Yonder In New Orleans"

With Gordon MacRae
"'A' — You're Adorable"
"Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo (The Magic Song)" 
"Dearie"
"Echoes"
"My Darling, My Darling"
"Say Something Sweet To Your Sweetheart"
"Whispering Hope"

With Johnny Mercer
"Candy"
"It's Great to Be Alive"

Jo Stafford Biography 

Early years
Stafford was born to Grover Cleveland Stafford and Anna York Stafford, a distant cousin of Sergeant Alvin York. Originally, she wanted to become an opera singer and studied voice as a child. However, because of the economic Great Depression, she abandoned that idea and joined her sisters Christine and Pauline in a popular vocal group, "The Stafford Sisters," which performed on Los Angeles radio station KHJ.

The Pied Pipers
When her sisters married, the group broke up and Stafford joined a new vocal group, The Pied Pipers. This group consisted of eight members: John Huddleston (who was Stafford's husband at the time), Hal Hooper, Chuck Lowry, Bud Hervey, George Tait, Woody Newbury, and Dick Whittinghill, besides Stafford. The group became very popular, working on local radio and movie soundtracks, and caught the attention of two of Tommy Dorsey's arrangers, Axel Stordahl and Paul Weston.

In 1938, Weston persuaded Dorsey to sign The Pied Pipers for his radio show, and they went to New York for a broadcast date. Dorsey liked them enough to sign them for ten weeks, but after the second broadcast the sponsor heard them and disliked them, firing the group. They stayed in New York for three months, but landed only a single job that paid them just $3.60 each, though they did record four sides for RCA Victor Records.

Half the members of the Pied Pipers returned to Los Angeles, but they had a difficult time trying to make a living until they got an offer from Dorsey to join his big band in 1939. This led to success for the whole group, but especially for Stafford, who was also featured in solo performances. The group also backed Frank Sinatra in some of his early recordings.

In 1942, the group had an argument with Dorsey and left, but in 1943 it became one of the first groups signed to Johnny Mercer's new label, Capitol Records. Capitol's music director was the same Paul Weston who had been instrumental in introducing Stafford to Dorsey. Weston and Stafford married in 1952. They went on to have two children, Tim and Amy.

Solo career
In 1944, Stafford left the Pied Pipers to go solo. Her tenure with the USO, in which she gave countless performances for soldiers stationed overseas, acquired her the nickname "GI Jo."

Beginning in 1944, she hosted the Tuesday and Thursday broadcasts of an NBC musical variety radio program — the Chesterfield Supper Club.

In 1948 Stafford and Gordon MacRae had a million-seller with their version of "Say Something Sweet to Your Sweetheart" and in 1949 repeated their success with "My Happiness".

In 1950, she left Capitol for Columbia Records, then returning to Capitol in 1961. At Columbia, she was the first recording artist to sell twenty-five million records. During her second stint at Capitol, Stafford also recorded for Frank Sinatra's Reprise label. These albums were released between 1961 and 1964, and were mostly retrospective in nature. Stafford left the label when Sinatra sold it to Warner Bros.

In the 1950s, she had a string of popular hits with Frankie Laine, six of which charted; their duet of Hank Williams' "Hey Good Lookin'" making the top ten in 1951. It was also at this time that Stafford scored her best known hits with huge records like "Jambalaya," "Shrimp Boats," "Make Love to Me," and "You Belong to Me". The last song was Stafford's all-time biggest hit, topping the charts in both the United States and the United Kingdom (the first song by a female singer to top the UK chart).

Comedy career
Stafford briefly experimented with comedy under the name "Cinderella G. Stump" with Red Ingle and the Natural Seven. True success in the comedy genre, though, would come about almost accidentally.

Throughout the 1950s, Stafford and Paul Weston would entertain guests at parties by putting on a skit in which they assumed the identities Jonathan and Darlene Edwards, a bad lounge act. Stafford, as Darlene, would sing off-key in a high pitched voice; Weston, as Jonathan, played an untuned piano off key and with bizarre rhythms.

Finding that she had time left over following a 1957 recording session, Stafford, as a gag, recorded a track as Darlene Edwards. Those who heard bootlegs of the recording responded positively, and later that year, Stafford and Weston recorded an entire album of songs as Jonathan and Darlene, entitled Jo Stafford and Paul Weston Present: The Original Piano Artistry of Jonathan Edwards, Vocals by Darlene Edwards. As a publicity stunt, Stafford and Weston claimed that the Edwardses were a New Jersey lounge act that they had discovered, and denied any personal connection; much time would pass before people realized (and Stafford and Weston admitted) that they were in fact the Edwardses. The album was followed up with a "pop standards" album, on which the pair intentionally butchered popular music. The album was a commercial and critical success; it proved to be the first commercially successful musical parody album, laying the groundwork for the careers of later "full time" musical parodists such as Weird Al Yankovic.

The couple continued releasing Jonathan and Darlene albums, with their 1961 album, Jonathan and Darlene Edwards in Paris winning that year's Grammy Award for Best Comedy Album (they "tied" with Bob Hope, as the Grammys decided, in a rare move, to issue two comedy awards that year. Hope was given an award for "Spoken Word Comedy.") It was the only major award that Stafford ever won.

The couple continued to release Jonathan and Darlene albums for several years, and in 1977 released a final, one-off single, a cover of The Bee Gees' "Stayin' Alive" backed with "I Am Woman." The same year also saw a brief resurgence in the popularity of Jonathan and Darlene albums when their cover of "Carioca" was featured as the opening and closing theme to The Kentucky Fried Movie.

Retirement
In 1966, Stafford went into semi-retirement, retiring completely from the music business in 1975. Except for the 1977 Jonathan and Darlene Edwards version of "Stayin' Alive," Stafford wouldn't perform again until 1990, at a ceremony honoring Frank Sinatra.

Stafford won a breach-of-contract lawsuit against her former record label in the early 1990s, which won her the rights to all of her old recordings, including the Jonathan and Darlene recordings. Following the lawsuit, Stafford, along with son Tim, reactivated the Corinthian Record label which began life as a religious label the deeply religious Paul Weston had started. With Paul Weston's help, she compiled a pair of Best of Jonathan and Darlene albums, which were released in 1993. In 1996, Paul Weston died of natural causes. Stafford continued to operate Corinthian Records. In 2006, she donated her library and her husband's to the University of Arizona.

Tony Snow - Former White House press secretary (53)

Tony SnowRobert Anthony "Tony" Snow (June 1, 1955 – July 12, 2008) was a White House Press Secretary, the third under President George W. Bush. Snow also worked for President George H. W. Bush as chief speechwriter and Deputy Assistant of Media Affairs. Snow served as White House Press Secretary from May 2006 until his resignation effective September 2007.

Between his two White House stints, Snow was a broadcaster and newspaper columnist. After years of regular guest-hosting for The Rush Limbaugh Show and providing news commentary for National Public Radio, he launched his own talk radio program, The Tony Snow Show, which went on to become nationally syndicated. He was also a regular personality on Fox News Channel since 1996, hosting Fox News Sunday, Weekend Live, and often substituting as host of The O'Reilly Factor. In April of 2008, shortly before his death, Snow joined CNN as a commentator.

Death of Tony Snow
On the early morning of July 12, 2008, Tony Snow died at Georgetown University Hospital as a result of colon cancer that had spread to his liver
Tony Snow was 53 years old at the time of his death

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Music
Snow was an avid musician. He played the trombone, flute, piccolo, accordion, saxophone, and guitar, and belonged to a cover band, Beats Workin', which featured fellow Washington-area professionals. Beats Workin' played publicly with a number of rock bands, including Snow's friends Skunk Baxter (The Doobie Brothers, Steely Dan) and Ian Anderson of Jethro Tull. He was featured on an episode of VH1 Classic's Rock 'n Roll Fantasy Camp.


Career

Early career
Snow began his newspaper career in 1979 in newspapers as an editorial writer for The Greensboro Record in North Carolina, next working as an editorial writer at The Virginian-Pilot in Norfolk, Virginia (1981–82), editorial page editor of The Daily Press in Newport News (1982–84), deputy editorial page editor of The Detroit News (1984–87) and editorial page editor of The Washington Times (1987–91). Also, The Detroit News published his commentary from 1993 to 2000, and he was a Counterpoint Columnist for USA Today from 1994 to 2000.

Snow also wrote a syndicated column for Creators Syndicate between 1993 and 2000. As a nationally syndicated columnist, his commentaries appeared in more than 200 newspapers nationwide. Snow won numerous awards during his print career, including citations from the Virginia Press Association, the Detroit Press Club, the Society of Professional Journalists, the American Society of Newspaper Editors, The Associated Press and Gannett.

He appeared on radio and television programs worldwide including The McLaughlin Group, The MacNeil–Lehrer NewsHour, Face the Nation, Crossfire, and Good Morning America. Until 1994, Snow was the writer, correspondent and host of a PBS news special, The New Militant Center.

In 1991, Snow took a sabbatical from journalism to work in the White House for President George H. W. Bush, first as chief speechwriter (Deputy Assistant to the President for Communications and Director of Speechwriting) and later as Deputy Assistant to the President for Media Affairs (1992–1993).

From 1996 to 2003, he served as the first host of FOX News Sunday, a Sunday morning interview and roundtable program produced by Fox News, airing on affiliates of the Fox Broadcasting Company and later in the day on Fox News Channel.

Snow served as the primary guest host of Rush Limbaugh's program from the mid-1990s on. He was also a frequent commentator on National Public Radio. Snow's own Tony Snow Show on Fox News Radio premiered in late 2003. It ended when he became White House Press Secretary in April 2006.

Return to the White House
In April 2006, Snow was named White House Press Secretary to replace Scott McClellan in the George W. Bush administration. His appointment to the position was formally announced on April 26, 2006. The position of White House Press Secretary has historically been filled by individuals from news media backgrounds.

His selection as press secretary was initially criticized because of some of his past comments about Bush. Bush acknowledged Snow's prior criticisms during the announcement of his appointment, stating that Snow was "not afraid to express his own opinions". Snow considered having input into the administration's policy debates a requirement for him to take the position.

Snow began his new press secretary duties on May 8, 2006.

On July 3, 2007, Snow had a combative press conference with White House reporters about the President's decision to commute a prison term for top Vice-Presidential aide Irving Lewis "Scooter" Libby, sentenced to 30 months in prison for obstruction of justice; Bush had once vowed to fire any White House staffer convicted in the case. When Snow denied Libby's commutation was motivated by party politics, one reporter accused Snow of "insulting their intelligence."

In his final press briefing on September 13, 2007, Snow commented that he would miss the duties of the position. "I love these briefings," he said.

Illness
Snow, having suffered for years from ulcerative colitis, was at an increased risk for colon cancer. On February 2005, this risk proved real, as he developed cancer in his colon. After having his colon removed, he returned to work in April 2005. On March 23, 2007, Snow announced that he would be undergoing surgery the following Monday to remove and investigate an abdominal growth. On March 27, the White House announced that the growth was cancerous and had metastasized. In Snow's absence, the press briefings began to be covered by Deputy Dana Perino. On April 21, Snow made an appearance at the annual White House Correspondent's Association Dinner, where he introduced a joking tape by David Letterman. Snow returned to work on April 30, 2007. On May 12, Snow delivered the Commencement Address for the Catholic University of America, in Washington, D.C., where he was presented with a degree of Doctor of Humane Letters, honoris causa. On September 19, it was reported in the AP that a cancerous growth was found inside his brain. Though Snow has been reluctant to describe himself as terminally ill, on September 27, he admitted to Jay Leno on The Tonight Show that he will have cancer for the rest of his life, "unless and until they find a cure." He then announced on October 4 on the Late Show With David Letterman that his cancer was in remission.

On April 23, 2008, the Associated Press reported that Snow was admitted to a Spokane hospital with an undisclosed illness. On April 22, he canceled appearances scheduled at Eastern Washington University. He was also expected to appear that day on CNN to analyze the Pennsylvania primary which occurred that day.

On May 28, 2008, he was forced to cancel speaking appearance at Ohio's Ashland University because of an unspecified illness and was told by his doctors he couldn't travel.

Roy Scheider, Jaws, dies 75

 

Roy Scheider bookRoy Scheider memorabilia
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Roy Scheider MemoryRoy Richard Scheider (November 10, 1932 - February 10, 2008) was an Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe-nominated American actor.

Death of Roy Scheider
In 2004, Roy Scheider was diagnosed with myeloma, a cancer of the plasma cells. In June 2005, he underwent a bone marrow transplant to successfully treat the cancer which was classified as being in partial remission. He died February 10, 2008 in Little Rock, Arkansas of complications from a staph infection
Roy Scheider was 75 years old at the time of his death.

Biography
Scheider was born in Orange, New Jersey. As a child Scheider was an athlete, participating in organized baseball and boxing competitions. He attended Columbia High School in Maplewood, New Jersey and was inducted into the school's hall of fame in 1985. He traded his boxing gloves for the stage, studying drama at both Rutgers University and Franklin and Marshall College, where he was a member of Phi Kappa Psi fraternity. After three years in the United States Air Force, he appeared with the New York Shakespeare Festival, and won an Obie Award in 1968

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Roy Scheider's biography continues 

Roy Scheider's first marriage was to Cynthia Bebout on November 8, 1962. The couple had one daughter, Maximillia, before divorcing in 1989. On February 11, 1989, he married his current wife, actress Brenda Siemer Scheider, with whom he has a son, Christian, and a daughter, Molly.


Film roles
Scheider's first film role was in the 1963 horror film Curse of the Living Corpse. (He was billed as "Roy R. Sheider"). In 1971 he appeared in two highly popular movies, Klute and The French Connection, the latter garnering him an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actor. Four years later he portrayed Chief Martin Brody in the Hollywood blockbuster Jaws. In 1976 he starred as Doc, a secret agent in Marathon Man with Dustin Hoffman and Laurence Olivier. In 1983 he starred in Blue Thunder, a John Badham film about a technologically advance attack helicopter prowling the skies of Los Angeles. This was followed by appearing in Peter Hyams' 2010: The Year We Make Contact, a 1984 sequel to Stanley Kubrick's 1968 science fiction classic 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Four years after he appeared in Jaws, he was nominated for his second Academy Award, this time as Best Actor in All That Jazz.

He was originally cast as Michael in The Deer Hunter, as the second movie of a three movie deal with Universal Studios. However, bound by a Universal contract to make a Jaws sequel, he was deprived of the role.

Scheider went on to star in films such as The Myth of Fingerprints (1997) and Silver Wolf (1998).


Other appearances
In 1993, Scheider signed on to star in the Steven Spielberg-produced television series seaQuest DSV. During the second season, Scheider voiced disdain for the direction in which the series was heading. His comments were highly publicized and the media criticized him for panning his own show. NBC made additional casting and writing changes in the third season, and Scheider decided to exit the show. His contract however, required that he make several guest appearances in season three.

He has also repeatedly guest starred on the NBC television series Third Watch. Among his most recent films is the crusty father of hero Frank Castle in The Punisher (2004).

Scheider also hosted an episode of Saturday Night Live in the tenth (1984-1985) season (musical guest: Billy Ocean) and appeared on the Family Guy episode Bill and Peter's Bogus Journey voicing himself as the host of a toilet-training video.

In 2007, Scheider received one of two annually-presented Lifetime Achievement Awards at the SunDeis Film Festival in Waltham, Massachusetts. (Academy Award winner Patricia Neal was the recipient of the other.)

Scheider guest-starred in an episode Law & Order: Criminal Intent as a death row inmate on May 14, 2007.

Filmography
The Curse of the Living Corpse (1964)
Paper Lion (1968)
Stiletto (1969)
Puzzle of a Downfall Child (1969)
Loving (1970)
Klute (1971)
The French Connection (1971)
The Seven-Ups (1973)
Jaws (1975)
Marathon Man (1976)
Sorcerer (1977)
Jaws 2 (1978)
Last Embrace (1979)
All That Jazz (1979)
Still of the Night (1982)
Blue Thunder (1983)
Tiger Town (1983)
2010: The Year We Make Contact (1984)
The Men's Club (1986)
52 Pick-Up (1986)
Cohen and Tate (1988)
Listen to Me (1989)
Night Game (movie) (1989)
The Fourth War (1989)
The Russia House (1990)
Somebody has to Shoot the Picture (1990)
Naked Lunch (1991)
Wild Justice (1993)
seaQuest DSV (1993) (television series)
Romeo is Bleeding (1994)
The Peacekeeper (1996)
Executive Target (1997)
The Myth of Fingerprints (1997)
The Rainmaker (1997)
The Rage (1997)
Plato's Run (1997)
Evasive Action (1998)
RKO 281 (1999)
Falling Through (2000)
Daybreak (2000)
The Doorway (2000)
Texas 46 (2002) aka The Good War (USA)
Dracula II: Ascension (2003)
The Punisher (2004)
Dark Honeymoon (2007)
The Poet (2007)
Iron Cross (2007)

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Tom Snyder

Tom SnyderTom Snyder (May 12, 1936 - July 29, 2007) was an American television personality, news anchor, and radio personality best known for his late night talk shows The Tomorrow Show, on the NBC television network in the late 1970s and '80s, and The Late Late Show, on the CBS television network in the 1990s.

Snyder was also the pioneer anchor of the primetime "NBC News Update", in the 1970s and early 1980s, which was a one-minute capsule of news updates in primetime; later in the mid 1980s, local affiliates took over these news update timeslots for local headlines which also served as promos for the local late newscasts

Death

Snyder died on July 29, 2007 in San Francisco from complications of leukemia. He was 71 years old at the time of his death.

Snyder had one child, Anne Mari Snyder, who lives in Maui, Hawaii, and two grandchildren.

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