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TV Evangelist Oral Roberts dies in California 91

Granville Oral Roberts (January 24, 1918 – December 15, 2009) was an American Pentecostal television evangelist and was also a Christian charismatic.

Death of Oral Roberts
Oral Roberts died on December 15, 2009 at the age of 91. He had been "semi retired" living in Newport Beach, California, and according to Charity Navigator, Roberts earned $83,505 per year.

Family
On May 4, 2005 Evelyn, Roberts' wife of 66 years, died in a Southern California hospital at the age of 88.

Roberts' daughter, Rebecca Nash, died in an airplane crash on February 11, 1977, with her husband, businessman Marshall Nash.

Roberts' eldest son, Ronald, committed suicide in June 1982, five months after receiving a court order to get counseling at a drug treatment center.

Two other children of Roberts are living: son Richard, a well-known evangelist and former president of Oral Roberts University (ORU), and daughter Roberta Potts, a lawyer.

Singer-songwriter Kenny Rankin dies of lung cancer at 67

Kenny Rankin (February 10, 1942 - June 7, 2009) was an American pop and jazz singer and songwriter from the Washington Heights neighborhood of New York City, New York.

Rankin appeared on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson more than 25 times. Host Johnny Carson was so impressed by him that he wrote the liner notes to Rankin's 1967 debut album Mind Dusters, which featured the single "Peaceful," a cover of which Helen Reddy would reach #12 in 1973. Georgie Fame also had a hit with this song in 1969.

When Paul McCartney and John Lennon were inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1987, McCartney asked Rankin to represent them at the ceremony based on the strength of his 1975 versions of McCartney's songs Blackbird and Penny Lane.

Death of Kenny Rankin
Rankin passed away from lung cancer on June 7, 2009
Kenny Rankin was 67 years old at the time of his death

Kenny Rankin - Blackbird

Kenny Rankin: Haven't We Met

1942 'Cat People' actress Jane Randolph dies 93

Died Actress 40's moviesJane Randolph, born Jane Roemer (October 30, 1915 - May 4, 2009), was an American film actress. She was born in Youngstown, Ohio and died in Gstaad, Switzerland.

After growing up in Kokomo, Indiana, she moved to Hollywood in 1939 in an attempt to start a movie career. She was eventually picked up by Warner Bros. and appeared in bit movie roles in 1941.

She made 20 films between 1941 and 1948, then married Jaime del Amo, who would help develop Del Amo Shopping Center on family land in Torrance. 

In 1942, RKO picked up the contract of the poised actress and she received a leading lady role in Highways by Night (1942). She became known for her roles in film noir, which included Jealousy (1945) and Railroaded! (1947), and in a few popular but inexpensive horror films, including Cat People (1942) and The Curse of the Cat People (1944).

One of her last movies was the comic thriller Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein (1948). A year later she married and retired to Spain and began the life of a socialite. In later years she returned to Los Angeles, but also maintained a home in Switzerland.

Death of Jane Randolph
Jane Randolph died May 4 in Gstaad, Switzerland, after surgery on a broken hip.
Jane Randolph was 93 at the time of her death

Cat People - Original Trailer 1942

Tony Award winner Natasha Richardson dies 45

Natasha RichardsonNatasha Jane Richardson (May, 11 1963 - March 18, 2009) was a British actress known for her performances on stage and screen. She was a member of the Redgrave family and the daughter of the actress Vanessa Redgrave and the director/producer Tony Richardson. Richardson rose to international stardom with her Tony award-winning performance as Sally Bowles in the musical play Cabaret in New York City on Broadway in 1998.

Death of Natasha Richardson
Natasha Richardson died after skiing accident. Her life-support equipment had been disconnected a day after the accident.
Natasha Richardson was 45 years old at the time of her death.

At approximately 7:00 pm, New York time, Liam Neeson's publicist issued this statement to the press:

Liam Neeson, his sons, and the entire family are shocked and devastated by the tragic death of their beloved Natasha. They are profoundly grateful for the support, love and prayers of everyone, and ask for privacy during this very difficult time.

Child Star, Shirley Jean Rickert, 'Our Gang' comedies, dies 82

Shirley Jean Rickert (March 25, 1926 - February 6, 2009) was an American child actress who was briefly the "blonde girl" for the Our Gang series in 1931, during the Roach talkie period. She left the "Our Gang" to work at Mickey Rooney's comedy show.

After the series, she had a brief movie career, followed by a string of jobs including driving trucks for the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II. She also worked in burlesque as Gilda and Her Crowning Glory. Until her death, she performed quilting and worked with her daughter and grandchild.

Death of Shirley Jean Rickert
Shirley Jean Rickert died February 6, 2009 in Saratoga Springs, New York.
Shirley Jean Rickert died after a long illness.

First Lady of Star Trek Majel Roddenberry dies 76

Star Trek Actress diedMajel Barrett-Roddenberry (February 23, 1932 – December 18, 2008) (born Majel Leigh Hudec in Columbus, Ohio) was an American actress, and producer. She was also the widow of television director/producer/writer and Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry.

As a result of her marriage to Gene Roddenberry and the fact that she has been in every Star Trek series, she is sometimes referred to as "the First Lady of Star Trek". She and Gene Roddenberry were married in Japan on August 6, 1969, after the cancellation of the original Star Trek series.

Death of Majel Roddenberry
Barrett died December 18, 2008 as a result of complications from leukemia.
Majel Roddenberry was 76 years old at the time of her death

She appeared in the original Star Trek series as Nurse Christine Chapel, and also had a role in "Star Trek: The Next Generation."

She was also the voice of the USS Enterprise computer in almost every spin-off of the 1960s cult series

Actress, painter, singer Estelle Reiner, Carl Reiner's wife, dies 94

Estelle Reiner (June 5, 1914 - October 25, 2008), described by The New York Times as "matriarch of one of the leading families in American comedy", was an actress who was the wife of Carl Reiner and the mother of Rob Reiner. Reiner, herself, has been credited with delivering one of the most memorable lines in movie history.

Death of Estelle Reiner
Estelle Reiner died of natural causes on October 25, 2008 at age 94 in her home in Beverly Hills, California.

Estelle Reiner's most enduring film role was in 1989's When Harry Met Sally..., in which director Rob Reiner cast his mother as a customer in a scene with stars Billy Crystal and Meg Ryan at Katz's Delicatessen, in which Ryan fakes what was described as "a very public (and very persuasive) orgasm". Approached by a waitress after Ryan finishes, Reiner deadpans "I’ll have what she’s having". The line was ranked 33rd on the American Film Institute's list of the Top 100 movie quotations, just behind Casablanca's "Round up the usual suspects".

Kingston Trio's Nick Reynolds, folk singer dies 75

Nick Reynolds is the father of folk songs, paved the way for Bob Dylan and Joan Baez.

Nick Reynolds (July 27, 1933 San Diego, California - October 1, 2008 San Diego, California) American folk musician and recording artist. One of the founding members of The Kingston Trio group, whose largely folk-based material captured international attention during the late fifties and early sixties.

Death of Nick Reynolds
Nick Reynolds died on October 1, 2008, in San Diego, CA
Nick Reynoldswas 75 years old at the time of his death

Nick Reynolds lived the last years of his life comfortably and well in Coronado, California with his wife Leslie. For eight years, Nick joined John Stewart to do a “Trio” fantasy camp in Scottsdale, Arizona. In addition to a dinner with a question and answer session, fantasy campers joined Reynolds and Stewart on stage to perform a song, becoming for that one moment a member of a "Kingston Trio," the group whose contributions to folk, pop, and world music constitute Nick Reynolds' musical legacy.

Nick Reynolds' biography continues next page

The man who never returned

Biography
Growing up in Coronado Island, California, his passions as a kid growing up were tennis, skin-diving and singing with his family. His father, a Navy captain, was an avid guitar player who brought back songs from his travels around the world. He taught Nick the guitar and ukulele, and the family spent many nights singing and harmonizing for pure enjoyment. Nick enrolled in Menlo College in 1954 as a business major, and met Bob Shane in an accounting class. They soon started hanging out, drinking, and chasing women together, and this, in turn, led to playing music, initially as a way of being popular at parties -- Shane's guitar and Reynolds' bongos became a fixture at local frat gatherings, and after a few weeks of this, Shane introduced Reynolds to Dave Guard.

Shane returned to Hawaii for a time to work for his father's sporting goods company. Guard and Reynolds began playing with Joe Gannon on bass and singer Barbara Bogue, and became Dave Guard & the Calypsonians. Reynolds then left for a time following his graduation and was replaced by Don McArthur in a group that was known as the Kingston Quartet, and in a resulting shuffle, Reynolds and Shane (back all the way from Hawaii) were brought back into the group, now rechristened the Kingston Trio. Their initial approach to music was determined by the skills that each member brought or, more accurately, didn't bring to the trio -- Nick Reynolds sang a third above the melody, swapped his ukulele for a tenor guitar, and his bongos for a conga drum. Reynolds provided the group with an ebullient vocal style, superb harmonizing, and an ability to convey tender lyrics with a touching intimacy. The trio disbanded in 1967 but was revived in the seventies under the direction of original member Bob Shane, and continues to the present although Shane retired from performing in 2004. When the Trio disbanded, Nick moved to Oregon where he spent twenty years ranching and raising 4 children.

In 1981 the Trio reunited, featuring Bob Shane, Nick Reynolds, Dave Guard, John Stewart, George Grove, Roger Gambill. A PBS Reunion Special DVD was recorded, hosted by Tommy Smothers and featuring special guest Mary Travers. In 1983, Nick Reynolds collaborated with John Stewart and Lindsey Buckingham on a new album/CD "Revenge of The Budgie" with seven new recordings.

In the mid-eighties Reynolds moved back to California and rejoined the Trio in 1987/1988. He sang and played with them happily for another 11 years, then retired for the second time in December, 1999. Folk Music Archives interviewed the Trio in San Antonio and New York City when Nick Reynolds, a founding 1958 member performed his last full-time performance with the group during a concert with the San Antonio Symphony.

Jerry Reed, Smokey & The Bandit Actor and Guitar Legend Dies 71

Jerry Reed Hubbard (March 20, 1937 - September 1, 2008), known professionally as Jerry Reed, was an American country music singer, country guitarist, session musician, songwriter, and actor who appeared in over a dozen films. As a singer, he may be best known for When You're Hot, You're Hot, for which he received the Grammy Award for Best Male Country Vocal Performance in 1972 and East Bound and Down, the theme song to the first Smokey and the Bandit movie in which he portrayed the "Snowman", Cletus Snow.

Death of Jerry Reed
Jerry Reed died in Nashville, Tennessee, of complications from emphysema.
Jerry Reed was 71 years old at the time of his death

Jerry Reed's filmography & discography continues next apge

Discography
The Unbelievable Guitar and Voice of Jerry Reed (1967)
Nashville Underground (1968)
Alabama Wild Man (1968)
Better Things in Life (1969)
Jerry Reed Explores Guitar Country (1969)
Georgia Sunshine (1970)
Cookin' (1970)
When You're Hot, You're Hot (1971)
Ko-ko Joe (1971)
Smell the Flowers (1972)
The New Scooby-Doo Movies (1972)
Jerry Reed (1972)
Hot a' Mighty! (1973)
Lord, Mr. Ford (1973)
The Uptown Poker Club (1973)
A Good Woman's Love (1974)
Mind Your Love (1975)
Red Hot Picker (1975)
Both Barrels (1976)
Jerry Reed Rides Again (1977)
East Bound and Down (1977)
Sweet Love Feelings (1978)
Jerry Reed Live! (1979)
Jerry Reed sings Jim Croce (1980)
Texas Bound and Flyin' (1980)
Dixie Dreams (1981)
Roscoe and Jimmy (1981)
The Man with the Golden Thumb (1982)
The Bird (1982)
Ready (1983)
Poppin', Lockin', and Loadin'! (1983)
My Best to You (1984)
What Comes Around (1985)
Lookin' at You (1986)
The Essential Jerry Reed (1995)
Flyin' High (1995)
Pickin' (1998)
Jerry Reed Visits Hit Row (2000)
Finger Dancing (2000)
Jerry Reed, Live Still! (2005)
Let's Git It On (2006)
The Gallant Few (2008)

Filmography
Gator (1976)
Smokey and the Bandit (1977)
High-Ballin' (1978)
The Concrete Cowboys (1979)
Hot Stuff (1979)
Smokey and the Bandit II (1980)
Smokey and the Bandit Part 3 (1983)
The Survivors (1983)
What Comes Around (1985)
Bat 21 (1988)
The Waterboy (1998)

Biography

Early life
Reed was born in Atlanta, Georgia, the second child of Robert and Cynthia Hubbard. Reed's parents separated four months after his birth, and he and his sister spent seven years in foster homes or orphanages. Reed was reunited with his mother and stepfather in 1944. Music and impromptu performances helped ease the stressful times the new family was under.

By high school, (O'Keefe High School, Atlanta, Georgia) Reed was already writing and singing music, having picked up the guitar as a child. At age 18, he was signed by publisher and record producer Bill Lowery to cut his first record, "If the Good Lord's Willing and the Creeks Don't Rise." At Capitol Records, he recorded both country and rockabilly singles to little notice, until label mate Gene Vincent covered his "Crazy Legs" in 1958. By 1958, Lowery signed Reed to his National Recording Corporation, and he recorded for NRC as both artist and as a member of the staff band, which included other NRC artists Joe South and Ray Stevens.

Reed married Priscilla "(Prissy)" Mitchell in 1959. They have two daughters, Charlotte Elaine "Lottie" Reed Stewart, and Seidina Ann Reed Hinesley, born April 2, 1960.

Career
After a two-year stint in the military, Reed moved to Nashville in 1961 to continue his songwriting career, which had continued to gather steam while he was in the armed forces, thanks to Brenda Lee's 1960 cover of his "That's All You Got to Do." He also became a popular session and tour guitarist. In 1962, he scored some success with the singles "Goodnight Irene" and "Hully Gully Guitar," which found their way to Chet Atkins, who produced Reed's 1965 "If I Don't Live Up to It."

"Guitar Man"
In 1967, Reed notched his first chart hit with "Guitar Man," which Elvis Presley soon covered. Presley had come to Nashville to record in 1967, and one of the songs he was working on was "Guitar Man," which Reed had written and recorded. "I was out on the Cumberland River fishing, and I got a call from Felton Jarvis (then Presley's producer). He said, 'Elvis is down here. We've been trying to cut 'Guitar Man' all day long. He wants it to sound like it sounded on your album.' I finally told him, 'Well, if you want it to sound like that, you're going have to get me in there to play guitar, because these guys (you're using in the studio) are straight pickers. I pick with my fingers and tune that guitar up all weird kind of ways.'"

So, Jarvis hired Reed to play on the session. "I hit that intro, and [Elvis's] face lit up and here we went. Then after he got through that, he cut  'U.S. Male' at the same session. I was toppin' cotton, son." Reed also played the guitar for Elvis Presley's "Too Much Monkey Business" (1968), recorded in the same session. After Presley recorded another of Reed's songs, "U.S. Male," the songwriter recorded an Elvis tribute, "Tupelo Mississippi Flash," which proved to be his first Top 20 hit.

1970s
After releasing the 1970 crossover hit "Amos Moses," a hybrid of rock, country, and Cajun styles, which reached #8 on the U.S. Pop charts, Reed teamed with Atkins for the duet LP Me & Jerry. During the 1970 television season, he was a regular on the Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour, and in 1971 he issued his biggest hit, the chart-topper "When You're Hot, You're Hot," which was also the title track of his first solo album and reached #9 on the Pop charts.

A second collaboration with Atkins, Me & Chet, followed in 1972, as did a series of Top 40 singles, which alternated between frenetic, straightforward country offerings and more pop-flavored, countrypolitan material. A year later, he scored his second number one single with "Lord, Mr. Ford" (written by Dick Feller), from the album of the same name.

Atkins, who frequently produced Reed's music, remarked that he had to encourage Reed to put instrumental numbers on his own albums, as Reed always considered himself more of a songwriter than a player. Atkins, however, thought Reed was a better fingerstyle player than he himself was; Reed, according to Atkins, helped him work out the fingerpicking for one of Atkins' biggest hits, "Yakety Axe."

Reed was featured in animated form in a December 9, 1972 episode of Hanna-Barbera's The New Scooby-Doo Movies, "The Phantom of the Country Music Hall" (prod. #61-10). He sang and played the song "Pretty Mary Sunlite." That song is played throughout the episode as Scooby and the gang search for Reed's missing guitar.

In the mid-1970s, Reed's recording career began to take a back seat to his acting aspirations. In 1974, he co-starred with his close friend Burt Reynolds in the film W.W. and the Dixie Dancekings. While he continued to record throughout the decade, his greatest visibility was as a motion picture star, almost always in tandem with headliner Reynolds; after 1976's Gator, Reed appeared in 1978's High Ballin and 1979's Hot Stuff, which won the coveted Best Picture award from the Pawn Shop Association of America. He also co-starred in all three of the Smokey and the Bandit films; the first, which premiered in 1977, landed Reed a Number 2 hit with the soundtrack's "East Bound and Down."

Reed also took a stab at hosting a TV variety show, filming two episodes of The Jerry Reed Show in 1976. The show featured music performances and interview segments, but did not contain the comedy skits that usually were a part of variety shows of the '70s. Guests included Tammy Wynette, Ray Stevens, and Burt Reynolds.

In 1978, he appeared as himself in the television show Alice.

In 1979, he released a record comprised of both vocal and instrumental selections titled, appropriately enough, Half & Half. It was followed one year later by Jerry Reed Sings Jim Croce, a tribute to the late singer/songwriter. He starred in a TV movie in that year entitled The Concrete Cowboys.

1980s and 1990s
In 1982, Reed's career as a singles artist was revitalized by the chart-topping hit "She Got the Goldmine (I Got the Shaft)," followed by "The Bird," which peaked at Number 2. His last chart hit, "I'm a Slave," appeared in 1983. That same year, he co-starred with Robin Williams and Walter Matthau in the Michael Ritchie comedy The Survivors. Reed guest-starred in the October 13, 1983 episode of Mama's Family, "The Return of Leonard Oates" (Episode 13, Season 2), as Naomi Harper's ex-husband Leonard Oates.

On the invitation of the band, Jerry Reed and his band joined the Dexys Midnight Runners U.S tour in 1984. Unfortunately, Jerry had to drop out after playing only a few dates due to a commitment on the U.S. television show Hee Haw. Jerry was to appear as a recurring character in the "cornfield" sketch.

After an unsuccessful 1986 LP, Lookin' at You, Reed focused on touring until 1992, when he and Atkins reunited for the album Sneakin' Around before he again returned to the road.

Reed had a role as a Commander/Huey Pilot for Danny Glover's character in the 1988 movie Bat*21 starring Gene Hackman. Jerry also acted as executive producer on this film.

Reed starred in the 1998 Adam Sandler film, The Waterboy, as Red Beaulieu, the movie's chief antagonist and the head coach for the University of Louisiana Cougars football team.

He teamed up with country superstars Waylon Jennings, Mel Tillis, and Bobby Bare in the group Old Dogs. They recorded one album, in 1998, entitled Old Dogs, with songs written by Shel Silverstein. (Reed sang lead on "Young Man's Job" and "Elvis Has Left The Building," the latter possibly in deference to Elvis' helping launch his career.)

In 1998, the American rock band Primus covered the Jerry Reed song "Amos Moses" on the EP entitled Rhinoplasty.

2000s
In October 2004, "Amos Moses" was featured on the Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas soundtrack, playing on fictional radio station K-ROSE. His latest recording was released in 2006, named Let's Git It On. In 2007, UK band Alabama 3 (Known as A3 in the USA) covered his hit "Amos Moses" on their album M.O.R.

Reed has appeared as a guest on the fishing television series Bill Dance Outdoors. In one memorable appearance, Reed caught a particularly big largemouth bass and planned to have it preserved and mounted by a taxidermist. Dance objected to this plan, and freed the fish when Jerry wasn't looking. Reed became enraged when he discovered what had happened, and chased Dance off the boat and to shore. This incident was also mentioned in one of Jeff Foxworthy's standup comedy routines.

Reed appeared as a character in the Red Sovine-based comedy fiction blog "Tales From the Truckstop".

In 2008, the Youtube sensation Red State Update parodied the song "When You're Hot, You're Hot" in their feud with Democrat Senator Joe Biden of Delaware with the song "Fightin' Joe Biden".

British Actor Terence Rigby dies of lung cancer, aged 71


British actor, well known in the US

Terence Rigby (January 2 1937 - August 11, 2008) was an English actor. In the 1970s he was well-known as police dog-handler PC Snow in the long-running series Softly, Softly: Taskforce

The star's film credits included Mona Lisa Smile in 2003, James Bond movie Tomorrow Never Dies (1997), The Dogs of War (1980), Get Carter (1971), and Scandal in 1989.

Death of Terence Rigby
Terence Rigby died at his London home and had been suffering from lung cancer.
Terence Rigby was 71 years old at the time of his death

Tim Russert dies of a sudden heart attack - 58

Rim RussertTimothy John Russert, Jr. (May 7, 1950 – June 13, 2008) was an American journalist who hosted NBC's Meet the Press. He was NBC News' Washington Bureau Chief and hosted a weekly interview program on MSNBC Tim Russert. He was a frequent correspondent and guest on NBC's The Today Show and Hardball. He co-hosted the network's presidential Election Night coverage and presented the polling results of the NBC News/Wall Street Journal survey on the NBC Nightly News. Russert died from a sudden heart attack on June 13, 2008.

Death of Tim Russert
Shortly after 13:30 EDT on the afternoon of June 13, 2008, Russert collapsed at the offices of WRC-TV, which houses the Washington, D.C. bureau of NBC News where he was the Bureau Chief, while recording voiceovers for the Sunday edition of Meet the Press. The District of Columbia Fire and Rescue service received a call from NBC at 13:40 and dispatched an EMS unit which arrived at 13:44. The responding paramedics attempted to defibrillate Russert's heart three times on scene before transporting him to Sibley Memorial Hospital where he was pronounced dead shortly after arriving at 14:23.

Brad Renfro dies at the age of 25

Brad Renfro's DeathBrad Barron Renfro (July 25, 1982 – January 15, 2008) was an American actor. He made his film debut in 1994 in the lead role of The Client. He acted in 21 films, several short films, and two television episodes ("Law & Order: Criminal Intent" and "Recess") during his career. Much of his later career was marred by a pattern of substance abuse. He died January 15, 2008 from a heroin overdose.

Latest: Brad Renfro had a secret Son, known as "Y".

Death of Brad Renfro

Brad Renfro was found dead, at the age of 25, on January 15, 2008 in his Los Angeles apartment. On February 8, 2008, the Los Angeles County Coroner's office ruled that Renfro's death was accidental, attributing it to acute heroin/morphine intoxication.  His body was returned to East Tennessee, where he was buried on January 22, 2008 north of Knoxville, at Red House Cemetery in the small community of Blaine.  He was not included in the annual Academy Awards tribute to Hollywood figures who died in the past year.

Less than three weeks after his death, his grandmother Joanne – who had raised him and accompanied him regularly during his early acting career – died at her home at the age of 76.  Local officials stated that she died of natural causes

Max Roach, Jazz Drummer

Max Roach CD Audio
Buy from Amazon.com: Max Roach CD

Max Roach Famous DrummerMaxwell Lemuel "Max" Roach (January 10, 1924 – August 16, 2007) was a bebop/hard bop percussionist, drummer, and composer. He worked with many of the greatest jazz musicians, including Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus, Sonny Rollins and Clifford Brown. Roach also led his own groups, and made numerous musical statements relating to the civil rights movement of African-Americans. He is generally considered to be one of the most important drummers in history. Member of the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc.

Death
Max Roach was 83 years old at the time of his death.  Cause of death was not known. but he had suffered for years from a neurological disorder.

 

Boots Randolph, Saxophonist

Boots Randolph Benny HillHomer Louis "Boots" Randolph III (June 3, 1927 – July 3, 2007) was an American musician best known for his 1963 saxophone hit, "Yakety Sax" (Theme music for "The Benny Hill Show") . Randolph was a major part of the "Nashville Sound" for most of his professional career.

Death
On July 3, 2007, Randolph died at Skyline Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee, after suffering a brain hemorrhage. He was 80 years old.

Biography 
Randolph was born in Paducah, Kentucky and raised in Cadiz, Kentucky, attending high school in Evansville, Indiana.

At the end of World War II, Boots Randolph played saxophone, trombone and vibraphone in the United States Army Band. After his service in the Army, he played with Dink Welch's Kopy Kats in Decatur, Illinois from 1948-1954. He briefly resided in Louisville, Kentucky before returning to Decatur to start his own group. He left Decatur in 1957.

During his more than forty year career, Randolph performed in hundreds of venues alongside many artists in pop, rock, jazz, and country music. He played on several albums with Elvis Presley and also performed on soundtracks for a number of Presley's motion pictures.

Mr. Randolph recorded for Monument Records in Nashville and played on Roy Orbison's 1963 hit, "Mean Woman Blues." He was also featured on "Little Queenie" by REO Speedwagon, "Java" by Al Hirt, "Turn On Your Lovelight" by Jerry Lee Lewis, and "Rockin' 'Round The Christmas Tree" by Brenda Lee.

In 1977, Randolph opened a successful club of his own in Nashville's "Printers Alley." He also frequently appeared on the television program "Hee Haw".

His final solo studio album "A Whole New Ballgame" was released June 12, 2007.

Clip of Benny Hill Show - Featuring Yakety Sax

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Lou Rawls, singer

Hollywood Walk of Famer 

Lou Rawls CD DVD
Buy from Amazon.com: Lou Rawls CD, DVD

Lou Rawls SingerLouis Allen Rawls (December 1, 1933 – January 6, 2006) was a Chicago-born American soul music, jazz, and blues singer. Known for his smooth vocal style, Frank Sinatra once said that Rawls had "the classiest singing and silkiest chops in the singing game." Rawls released more than 70 albums, sold more than 40 million records, appeared as an actor in motion pictures and on television, and voiced-over many cartoons. He had been called "The Funkiest Man Alive".

Death of Lou Rawls
Rawls died on January 6, 2006 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles from complications of the cancers.  Lou Rawls was 74 years old at the time of his death.

Lou Rawls is well known for:

  • Phrase "Yeahhhh, buddy!"
  • Songs "Lady Love", "You'll Never Find Another Love Like Mine", "Love Is a Hurtin' Thing"
  • Captain from TV Show Bay Watch

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