Major Causes of Death: Accidental | Cancer | Drug | Heart Attack | Heart Failure | Lung | Natural Causes | Suicide

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Tammy Faye Bakker

Tammy Faye Bakker Books
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Tammy Faye BakkerTamara "Tammy" Faye Messner (March 7, 1942 – July 20, 2007) was an American Christian singer, evangelist, entrepreneur, author, talk show host, and television personality. She was the former wife of televangelist, and later convicted felon, Jim Bakker, and she co-hosted with him on The PTL Club from 1976 to 1987. She was known for her tendency to wear heavy makeup, particularly mascara and false eyelashes, and her eyebrows were tattooed on. She was a participant in the 2004 season of the reality show, The Surreal Life.

Death
On July 20, 2007 at 4 AM,Tammy Faye Messner died following her 11-year battle with cancer.  Tammy Faye Bakker was 65 years old at the time of her death.  What had started as colon cancer, spread to her lungs. She died in her home, said her booking agent, Joe Spotts. A family service was held the morning of July 21 in the Messner family plot in Waldron, Kansas, where her ashes were interred. The ceremony was officiated by the Rev. Randy McCain, the gay pastor of Open Door Community Church in Sherwood, Arkansas. She had frequently spoken about her medical problems, saying she hoped to be an inspiration to others. "Don't let fear rule your life," she said. "Live one day at a time, and never be afraid." She had written on her web site in May that the doctors had stopped trying to treat the cancer. She died the day after the airing of her interview on Larry King Live on CNN. According to CNN.com, the family requested that King officially report the news on his show July 21

Chris Benoit - Pro Wrestler

Chris BenoitChristopher Michael Benoit (May 21, 1967 – June 24, 2007) was a Canadian professional wrestler who wrestled for Extreme Championship Wrestling (ECW), World Championship Wrestling (WCW), and World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE). Benoit ascended to the top of his profession, holding the World heavyweight championship in both WCW and WWE, becoming one of the most popular and respected competitors in professional wrestling in the process. 

Chris Benoit's Death

On June 25, 2007, Benoit, his wife Nancy, and their 7-year-old son Daniel were found dead in their Fayetteville, Georgia, home at around 2:30 p.m. EDT. Lieutenant Tommy Pope of the Fayette County, Georgia Sheriff's Department reported to ABC News that police entered Benoit's home on a "welfare check" after several missed appointments, leading to concerns. Pope also stated the police were not searching for any suspects outside of the house, as the instruments of death were located at the scene of the crime.

Detective Bo Turner of the Fayette County Sheriff's Department told television station WAGA-TV that the case was being treated as a murder-suicide. The station reported that investigators believe that Benoit murdered his wife and son over the weekend and hanged himself sometime on Monday.

 

Richard Bell

Richard Bell (March 5, 1946 - June 15, 2007) was a Canadian musician. Known for his session and live performance work, he is perhaps best remembered as the pianist for Janis Joplin and her Full Tilt Boogie Band and was a keyboardist with The Band during the 1990s.

Death of Richard Bell
Bell died after a long battle with multiple myeloma, a type of cancer, on June 15, 2007 in a Toronto hospital. Richard Bell was 61 years old at the time of his death.

Roscoe Lee Browne , Actor

Emmy Award Winner 

Roscoe Lee BrowneRoscoe Lee Browne (May 2, 1925 – April 11, 2007) was an American Emmy Award-winning actor and director, known for his rich voice and dignified bearing.

His most memorable film roles include Alfred Hitchcock's Topaz, the title character in William Wyler's final film, The Liberation of L.B. Jones, and as the narrator in Babe.

 

Death

Browne died of cancer in Los Angeles on April 11, 2007, aged 81

 

Janet Blair, 40s actress

Janet Blair Dead ActressJanet Blair (April 23, 1921 - February 19, 2007) was an American film and television actress.

Death of Janet Blair
Janet Blair died of complications from pneumonia, at St. John's Health Center in Santa Monica, California.
Janet Blair was aged 85 at the time of her death.

Born as Martha Jane Lafferty (she took her acting surname from Blair County, Pennsylvania) in Altoona, Pennsylvania, she began her acting career on film in 1942. She left films for many years after she was dropped by her studio, Columbia Pictures, and disliked the roles she was offered.

Instead, she took the lead role of Nellie Forbush in a production of the stage musical South Pacific, making more than 1,200 performances in three years. " never missed a performance", she noted proudly. During the tour, she also got married to second husband, producer-director Nick Mayo, and they became parents of Amanda and Andrew.

She made a rare dramatic appearance in the 1962 British horror film Night of the Eagle.

Her last performance was on television in a 1991 episode of Murder, She Wrote, starring Angela Lansbury.

Janet Blair Singing "To Me"

James Brown

Hollywood Walk of Fame Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award

 James Brown CD

James Brown RememberJames Joseph Brown (May 3, 1933 – December 25, 2006), commonly referred to as "The Godfather of Soul" and "The Hardest Working Man in Show Business," was an American entertainer recognized as one of the most influential figures in 20th century popular music. He was renowned for his shouting vocals, feverish dancing and unique rhythmic style.

James Brown's Cause of Death
James Brown died from congestive heart failure. James Brown was 73 years at the time of his death.

Birth name: May 3, 1933 James Joseph Brown, Jr.
Born: Barnwell, South Carolina, United States
Origin: Augusta, Georgia
Died: December 25, 2006 (aged 73)
Atlanta, Georgia
Genre: R&B, soul, funk, Rock and Roll
Occupation: Singer, songwriter, dancer, bandleader, record producer
Instruments: Vocal percussion, guitar, harmonica, bass, keyboards, drums and other percussion instruments
Years active 1956 – 2006
Label: Federal, King, Try Me, Smash, People, Polydor, Scotti Bros.

Joseph Barbera - Cartonist at Hanna-Barbera dies 95

Joe BarberaJoseph Roland "Joe" Barbera (March 24, 1911 – December 18, 2006) was an animator, cartoon artist, storyboard artist, television director, television producer, and co-founder, together with William Hanna, of Hanna-Barbera. The studio produced popular cartoons such as The Huckleberry Hound Show, The Flintstones, The Jetsons, Scooby-Doo, Top Cat and Yogi Bear, as well as the musical film, Charlotte's Web.

Death of Joseph Barbera
Joe Barbera died at the age of 95 of natural causes at his home in Studio City, Los Angeles on December 18, 2006, ending a seventy-year career in animation. His wife Sheila was at his side when he died.

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Early years
Joseph Barbera (pronounced bar-BEAR-uh) was born in the Little Italy section of Manhattan, New York, to immigrants of Lebanese descent.

Career

Early career
Barbera started his career as a tailor's delivery boy. During the Great Depression, he tried unsuccessfully to become a magazine cartoonist for a magazine called The NY Hits Magazine. Additionally, he once told of a letter that he wrote to Walt Disney asking for advice about getting started in the animation industry. Barbera said that Disney wrote back and replied that "its a tough business" and that he (Barbera) should seek another line of work. Undeterred by Disney's comments, Joe Barbera pressed forward.

In 1932, he joined the Van Beuren Studio as an animator and scriptwriter. He worked on cartoons such as Cubby Bear, and Rainbow Parades and also co-produced Tom and Jerry (a couple of boys, unrelated to his later cat-and-mouse series). When Van Beuren closed down in 1936, Barbera moved over to the MGM studios.

Teaming with William Hanna
Lured by a substantial salary increase, Barbera left Terrytoons and New York for the new MGM cartoon unit in California in 1937. The following year, he teamed up with William Hanna to direct theatrical short cartoons; Barbera was the storyboard/layout artist, and Hanna was in charge of the timing. Their first venture was Puss Gets the Boot (1940), the first Tom and Jerry film, which was nominated for an Academy Award for Best (Cartoon) Short Subject.

Hanna and Barbera's 17-year partnership on the Tom & Jerry series resulted in 7 Academy Awards for Best (Cartoon) Short Subject, and 14 total nominations, more than any other character-based theatrical animated series. Hanna and Barbera were placed in charge of MGM's animation division in late 1955; however, this proved short-lived as MGM closed the division in 1957. They subsequently teamed up to produce the series The Ruff & Reddy Show, under the name H-B Enterprises, soon changed to Hanna-Barbera Productions. By using the limited animation techniques, Hanna and Barbera could provide programming for networks at reduced cost.

By the late 1960s, Hanna-Barbera Productions had become the most successful television animation studio, producing hit television programs such as The Flintstones, The Jetsons, Jonny Quest, and Scooby-Doo, Where Are You!.

Later career
Hanna-Barbera had been a subsidiary of Taft Broadcasting (later Great American Communications) since 1967. The studio thrived until 1991, when it was sold to Turner Broadcasting. Hanna and Barbera stayed on as advisors and periodically worked on new Hanna-Barbera shows, including the What-a-Cartoon! series.

He served as creative consultant for the 1993 motion picture, Tom and Jerry: The Movie for Miramax Films and Film Roman. Hanna-Barbera, received eight Emmys, including the Governors Award of the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences in 1988.

Their strengths melded perfectly, critic Leonard Maltin wrote in his book Of Mice and Magic: A History of American Animated Cartoons. Barbera brought the comic gags and skilled drawing, while Hanna brought warmth and a keen sense of timing. Maltin wrote:

"This writing-directing team may hold a record for producing consistently superior cartoons using the same characters year after year - without a break or change in routine."
Hanna, who died in 2001, once said he was never a good artist but his partner could "capture mood and expression in a quick sketch better than anyone I've ever known."

After Hanna's death, Barbera remained active as an executive producer for Warner Bros. Animation on direct-to-video cartoon features as well as television series such as What's New, Scooby-Doo? and Tom and Jerry Tales. In the Tom and Jerry cartoon "The Mansion Cat" from 2000, Barbera was the houseowner's voice actor. He also wrote, co-storyboarded, co-directed and co-produced the theatrical Tom and Jerry short The KarateGuard in 2005, thus returning to his and Hanna's first successful cartoon format. His final animated project was the direct-to-video feature Tom and Jerry: A Nutcracker Tale, which came out on DVD in the U.S. on October 2, 2007.

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Ed Bradley - 60 Minutes, CBS News

Ed BradleyEdward Rudolph Bradley, Jr. (June 22, 1941 – November 9, 2006) was an American journalist, best known for 26 years of award-winning work on the CBS News television magazine 60 Minutes. During his earlier career he also covered the fall of Saigon, was the first black television correspondent to cover the White House, and anchored his own news broadcast, "CBS Sunday Night with Ed Bradley." He was the recipient of multiple awards, including 19 Emmy Awards, and a Lifetime Achievement Award by the National Association of Black Journalists.

Death of Ed Bradley
In the company of his longtime friend Jimmy Buffett, Bradley died on November 9, 2006 at Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan of complications from leukemia.He was sixty-five.

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Red Buttons - Comedian, Actor, dies 87

Hollywood Walk of FameOscar WinnerGolden Globe Winner 

Red ButtonsRed Buttons (February 5, 1919 – July 13, 2006) was an American comedian and actor.

Death of Red Buttons
Red Buttons died of vascular disease on July 13, 2006 at his home in the Century City area of Los Angeles. Red Buttons was 87 years old. Buttons had been ill for some time and was with family members when he passed away

Early life
Red Buttons was born Aaron Chwatt on February 5, 1919 in New York City to Jewish immigrants. At sixteen years old, Buttons got a job as an entertaining bellhop at Ryan's Tavern in City Island, Bronx. The combination of his red hair and the shiny buttoned bellhop uniform inspired orchestra leader Charles "Dinty" Moore to call him Red Buttons, the name under which he would later perform.

Later that same summer, Buttons worked on the Borscht Belt; his straight man was Robert Alda. In 1939, Buttons started working for Minsky's Burlesque; in 1941, José Ferrer chose Buttons to appear in a Broadway show The Admiral Had a Wife. The show was a farce set in Pearl Harbor, and it was due to open on December 8, 1941. It never did, as it was deemed inappropriate after the Japanese attack. In later years Buttons would joke that the Japanese only attacked Pearl Harbor to keep him off Broadway.

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Career
In September 1942, Buttons at last got his Broadway debut in Vickie with Ferrer and Uta Hagen. Later that year, he appeared in the Minsky's show Wine, Women and Song; this was the last Burlesque show in New York City history, as the Mayor La Guardia administration closed it down. Buttons was on stage when the show was raided.

1943 saw Buttons in the Army Air Corps. He was chosen to appear in the Broadway show Winged Victory, as well as appearing in the Darryl F. Zanuck movie version. He later went on to entertain troops in the European Theater of operations in the same unit as Mickey Rooney.

After the war, Buttons continued to do Broadway shows. He also performed at Broadway movie houses with the Big Bands. In 1952, Buttons received his own variety series on television - The Red Buttons Show ran for three years, and achieved high levels of success. His catch phrase from the show, "strange things are happening," entered the national vocabulary briefly in the mid-1950s.

His role in Sayonara was a dramatic departure from his previous work. In that film, he played Joe Kelly, an American airman stationed in Kobe, Japan during the Korean War, who falls in love with Katsumi, a Japanese woman (played by Miyoshi Umeki), but is barred from marrying her by military rules intended to reassure the local populace that the U.S. presence is temporary. His portrayal of Kelly's calm resolve not to abandon the relationship and touching reassurance of Katsumi impressed audiences and critics alike; both he and Umeki won Academy Awards for the film. After his Oscar-winning role, Buttons performed in numerous feature films, including Hatari!, The Longest Day, Harlow, The Poseidon Adventure, They Shoot Horses, Don't They?, Pete's Dragon, and 18 Again! with George Burns. Buttons also made many memorable TV appearances on programs including Little House on the Prairie, It's Garry Shandling's Show, ER and Roseanne.

He became a nationally recognizable comedian, and his "Never Got A Dinner" sketch was a standard at the Dean Martin roasts for many years.

Number 71 on Comedy Central's list of the 100 Greatest Stand-Ups of All Time, Buttons received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for television, located at 1651 Vine Street.

Personal life
Buttons was married to actress Roxanne Arlen in 1947, but it soon ended in divorce. His next marriage was to Helayne McNorton, from December 8, 1949 until 1963. His last marriage was to Alicia Pratt, which lasted from January 27, 1964 until her death in March 2001. Buttons had two children, daughter Amy Buttons and son Adam Buttons. He was the advertising spokesman for the Century Village, Florida retirement community.

Buttons was an early member of the Synagogue for the Performing Arts, and at the time, Rabbi Jerome cutler was the Rabbi.

YearFilmRoleOther notes
1947Winged VictoryWhitey/Andrews Sisteras Cpl. Red Buttons
13 Rue MadeleineSecond Jump Masteruncredited
1951Footlight VarietiesHimself
1957SayonaraAirman Joe KellyAcademy Award for Best Supporting Actor
Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor - Motion Picture
Nominated - BAFTA Award for most promising newcomer
1958Imitation GeneralCpl. Chan Derby 
1959The Big CircusRandy Sherman 
1961One, Two, ThreeMP sergeantuncredited
1962Hatari!Pockets 
Five Weeks in a BalloonDonald O'Shay 
The Longest DayPvt. John Steele 
Gay Purr-eeRobespierrevoice
1963A Ticklish AffairUncle Cy 
1964Your Cheatin' HeartShorty Younger 
1965Up from the BeachPfc. Harry Devine 
HarlowArthur LandauNominated - Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor - Motion Picture
1966StagecoachPeacock 
1969The MoviemakersHimselfshort subject
They Shoot Horses, Don't They?SailorNominated - Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor - Motion Picture
1971Who Killed Mary What's 'Er Name?Mickey 
1972The Poseidon AdventureJames Martin 
1976Gable and LombardIvan Cooper 
1977Viva Knievel!Ben Andrews 
Pete's DragonHoagy 
1978Movie MoviePeanuts/Jinks Murphy 
1979C.H.O.M.P.S.Bracken 
1980When Time Ran OutFrancis Fendly 
1985Alice in WonderlandThe White Rabbit 
198818 Again!Charlie 
1990The AmbulanceElias Zacharai 
1994It Could Happen to YouWalter Zakuto 
1999The Story of UsArnie Jordan 
2001Odessa or BustThe Old Manshort subject
2004Goodnight, We Love You documentary
2005Sid Bernstein Presents...Himselfdocumentary

Syd Barrett - Founding member of Pink Floyd dies 60

Syd BarrettRoger Keith "Syd" Barrett (January 6, 1946 – July 7, 2006) was an English singer, songwriter, guitarist and artist. He is most remembered as a founding member of British progressive rock band Pink Floyd, providing major musical and stylistic direction in their early work, although he left the group in 1968 amidst speculations of mental illness exacerbated by heavy drug use.

Death of Syd Barrett
Barrett died on Friday 7 July 2006 at his home in Cambridge. He died of pancreatic cancer, but this was usually reported as "complications from diabetes." The occupation on his death certificate was given as "retired musician."

According to a local Cambridge newspaper, Barrett left approximately £1.25 million to his two brothers and two sisters. This income was apparently largely acquired via royalties from Pink Floyd compilations and live recordings which featured songs he had written whilst with the band.

A tribute concert was held at the Barbican Centre, London on 10 May 2007 with Robyn Hitchcock, Captain Sensible, Damon Albarn, Chrissie Hynde, Kevin Ayers and his Pink Floyd bandmates performing (albeit not on stage at the same time for the last).

Les Brown - Big Band Leader who brought Doris Day

Hollywood Walk of Famer 

Death Big band leader Les Brown Famous dead people
Buy from Amazon.com: Les Brown's Big Band CD's

Les Brown Band LeaderLes Brown, Sr. (March 14, 1912 – January 4, 2001) and the Band of Renown are a big band that began in the big band era of the late 1930s and now performs under the direction of his son Les Brown, Jr.

Death of Les Brown
Les Brown's cause of death was not specified to public.
Les Brown was 91 years old at the time of his death. Les Brown Sr. is interred in the Westwood Village Memorial Park Cemetery in Los Angeles, California.

Biography
"Les Brown and the Band of Renown" brought Doris Day into prominence with their recording of "Sentimental Journey" in 1945. The release of "Sentimental Journey" coincided with the end of WWII in Europe and was the homecoming theme for many veterans. They had nine other number-one hit songs, including "I've Got My Love to Keep Me Warm."

Les Brown with Doris Day - Lost Horizon

Lloyd Bridges, movie giant dies 85 - natural causes

7065 Hollywood Boulevard 

Lloyd Vernet Bridges, Jr. (January 15, 1913 - March 10, 1998) was an Emmy Award-nominated American actor. Bridges starred in popular television series, and appeared in more than 150 films.

Death of Lloyd Bridges
Lloyd Bridges died of natura causes.
Lloyd Bridges was 85 years old at the time of his death.

Lloyd Bridges appeared in more than 150 films. He started as a contract performer for Columbia Pictures, appearing in classics such as High Noon, Little Big Horn, and Sahara. By the end of his career, he was a staple of parody films such as Airplane!, Hot Shots!, and Jane Austen's Mafia!. He acted in the role of "The President" in the movie Hot Shots: Part 2.

Bridges made his Broadway debut in 1939 in a production of Shakespeare's Othello. He made a few film appearances before enlisting in the U.S. Coast Guard. Following World War II, he returned to film acting. He was blacklisted briefly in the 1950s after he admitted to the House Un-American Activities Committee that he had once been a member of the Actors' Lab, a group with links to the Communist Party. He resumed working after being cleared by the FBI, finding his greatest success in television.

Seinfeld.  Izzy Mandelbaum - played by Lloyd Bridges

Lloyd Bridges' Filmography continues next page

Filmography

Features
Freshman Love (1936)
Dancing Feet (1936)
The Lone Wolf Takes a Chance (1941)
They Dare Not Love (1941)
The Medico of Painted Springs (1941)
The Son of Davy Crockett (1941)
Here Comes Mr. Jordan (1941)
Our Wife (1941)
Harmon of Michigan (1941)
Two Latins from Manhattan (1941)
You Belong to Me (1941)
Three Girls About Town (1941)
The Royal Mounted Patrol (1941)
Sing for Your Supper (1941)
Honolulu Lu (1941)
Harvard, Here I Come! (1941)
West of Tombstone (1942)
Blondie Goes to College (1942)
Cadets on Parade (1942)
Shut My Big Mouth (1942)
Canal Zone (1942)
Tramp, Tramp, Tramp (1942)
North of the Rockies (1942)
Alias Boston Blackie (1942)
The Wife Takes a Flyer (1942)
Sweetheart of the Fleet (1942)
Riders of the Northland (1942)
Flight Lieutenant (1942)
Atlantic Convoy (1942)
The Talk of the Town (1942)
A Man's World (1942)
The Spirit of Stanford (1942)
The Daring Young Man (1942)
Boston Blackie Goes Hollywood (1942)
Pardon My Gun (1942)
Underground Agent (1942)
Counter-Espionage (1942) (uncredited) (waiter)
Commandos Strike at Dawn (1943)
City Without Men (1943)
One Dangerous Night (1943)
Destroyer (1943)
Passport to Suez (1943)
Hail to the Rangers (1943)
Sahara (1943)
The Heat's On (1943)
There's Something About a Soldier (1943)
Crime Doctor's Strangest Case (1943)
Once Upon a Time (1944)
She's a Soldier Too (1944)
Louisiana Hayride (1944)
The Master Race (1944)
Saddle Leather Law (1944)
Secret Agent X-9 (1945)
Strange Confession (1945)
A Walk in the Sun (1945)
Abilene Town (1946)
Miss Susie Sagle's (1946)
Canyon Passage (1946)
Ramrod (1947)
 The Trouble with Women (1947)
Thunderbolt (1947)
Unconquered (1947)
Secret Service Investigator (1948)
16 Fathoms Deep (1948)
Moonrise (1948)
Hideout (1949)
Red Canyon (1949)
Home of the Brave (1949)
Calamity Jane and Sam Bass (1949)
Trapped (1949)
Colt .45 (1950)
Rocketship X-M (1950)
The White Tower (1950)
The Sound of Fury (1950)
Little Big Horn (1951)
Three Steps North (1951)
High Noon (1952)
Plymouth Adventure (1952)
Last of the Comanches (1953)
The Tall Texan (1953)
The Kid from Left Field (1953)
City of Bad Men (1953)
The Limping Man (1953)
Pride of the Blue Grass (1954)
The Deadly Game (1954)
Wichita (1955)
Apache Woman (1955)
Wetbacks (1956)
The Rainmaker (1956)
Ride Out for Revenge (1957)
The Goddess (1958)
A Pair of Boots (1962)
Around the World Under the Sea (1966)
Daring Game (1968)
Attack on the Iron Coast (1968)
The Happy Ending (1969)
Scuba (1972) (documentary) (narrator)
To Find a Man (1972)
Running Wild (1973)
The Fifth Musketeer (1979)
Bear Island (1979)
Airplane! (1980)
Airplane II: The Sequel (1982)
The Thanksgiving Promise (1986)
Weekend Warriors (1987)
The Wild Pair (1987) with son Beau Bridges
Tucker: The Man and His Dream (1988)
Winter People (1989)
Cousins (1989)
Joe Versus the Volcano (1990)
Hot Shots! (1991)
Honey, I Blew Up the Kid (1992)
Earth and the American Dream (1992) (documentary) (narrator)
Mr. Bluesman (1993)
Hot Shots! Part Deux (1993)
Blown Away (1994)
Jane Austen's Mafia! (1998)
Meeting Daddy (2000)
From Russia to Hollywood: The 100-Year Odyssey of Chekhov and Shdanoff (2002)
 


Short subjects
The Great Glover (1942)
They Stooge to Conga (1943)
A Rookie's Cookie (1943)
His Wedding Scare (1943)
Mr. Whitney Had a Notion (1949)
My Daddy Can Lick Your Daddy (1962)
The World of Inner Space (1966)
I Am Joe's Heart (1987) (voice)

Television work
Sea Hunt (1957-1961)
The Lloyd Bridges Show (1962-1963)
The Eleventh Hour with son Beau, "Cannibal Plants, They Eat You Alive" as Leonard McCarty (1964)
The Loner (1965-1966)
Mission: Impossible (1966) (Fakeout:Anastas Poltroni)
A Case of Libel (1968)
Lost Flight (1969)
Silent Night, Lonely Night (1969)
The Silent Gun (1969)
The Love War (1970)
San Francisco International Airport (1970-1971)
Do You Take This Stranger? (1971)
A Tattered Web (1971)
Deadly Dream (1971)
Water World (1972-1975) (narrator)
Haunts of the Very Rich (1972)
Trouble Comes to Town (1973)
Crime Club (1973)
Death Race (1973)
Benjamin Franklin (1974) (miniseries)
The Whirlwind (1974)
Stowaway to the Moon (1975)
Cop on the Beat (1975)
Joe Forrester (1975-1976)
Force of Evil (1977)
Roots (1977) (miniseries)
Telethon (1977)
Shimmering Light (1978)
Battlestar Galactica (1978 TV series) (Commander Cain)
Alice in Wonderland (1985 miniseries) (White Knight)
Shining Time Station: 'Tis a Gift (PBS TV Special) (Mr. Nicholas)
Leona Helmsley: The Queen of Mean (1990) (Harry Helmsley)
In The Nick Of Time (1991 Christmas Movie) (Santa Claus)
The Outer Limits – "The Sandkings" (March 26, 1995)
Dress Gray (1986) (miniseries)
Seinfeld (1997) (Izzy Mandelbaum)

Laurie Bird (25)- Female version of James Dean

Laurie Bird ActressLaurie Bird (September 26, 1953 – June 15, 1979) was an American actress and photographer. She appeared in just three films: Two-Lane Blacktop (1971), Cockfighter (1974), and a small role in Annie Hall (1977). Bird shot the cover photo for Art Garfunkel's Watermark album in 1978, and was the still photographer on Cockfighter.

Bird's mother died when she was three, and her father worked long hours, so she more or less raised herself. She was romantically involved with her Blacktop and Cockfighter director Monte Hellman, and later with Garfunkel for several years.

Bird committed suicide in Garfunkel's New York apartment.

Related Story: Charles H. Joffe (July 16, 1929 - July 9, 2008) won Oscar for producing Annie Hall.

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