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Suzanne Pleshette - Character actress (Emily Hartley)

Suzanne PleshetteSuzanne Pleshette (January 31, 1937 - January 17, 2008) was an American actress, primarily known in character-type roles.

The naturally brunette-headed Pleshette was best known for her role as Bob Newhart's wife, Emily Hartley, on The Bob Newhart Show in the 1970s. She later guest-starred as Katey Sagal's mother, Laura Egan, on 8 Simple Rules, in the 2000s.

Death of Suzanne Pleshette
Suzanne Pleshette died early in the evening of January 17, 2008 of respiratory failure at her Los Angeles home.
Suzanne Pleshette was 70 years old at the time of her death.

** Suzanne Pleshette's husband is Tom Poston, an actor who passed away April 30, 2007.  At the time of her death, the city of Hollywood was getting ready for her star on the walk of fame.

Early life
Born to Eugene Pleshette, manager of the Paramount Theater in Brooklyn, New York and dancer Geraldine Kaplan, she was a cousin of Knots Landing actor John Pleshette. Pleshette graduated from Manhattan's High School of Performing Arts. She then attended Syracuse University.

Stu Nahan - Los Angeles Sports Broadcaster

 

Stu Nahan

A television veteran since the 1950s, Stu Nahan (1926 - December 26, 2007) is best remembered for his role as a boxing commentator in all of the Rocky films as well as being a longtime sportscaster in the Los Angeles market. He received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on May 25, 2007. Nahan had battled lymphoma, a form of cancer, since being diagnosed in January 2006

Early life and career
Nahan originally began working on a children's television program, appearing as "Skipper Stu", in Sacramento in the 1950s. He also worked for KCRA in Sacramento as a sportscaster.

Stu later moved to Philadelphia to host his own children's show as Captain Philadelphia on the now defunct WKBS-TV (Philadelphia). During this stint in Philadelphia, Nahan also provided the play-by-play commentary for the Philadelphia Flyers of the NHL at WTAF, working alongside Gene Hart.

Film career
In the mid-to-late 1970s, Nahan began working in the movie industry. He always played a sports personality, such as a commentator, and usually as himself. Aside from the Rocky film series, Nahan is also remembered for a very small appearance in the film Fast Times at Ridgemont High when he interviews the character Jeff Spicolli (played by Sean Penn) in a dream sequence. He also had a very bit part in the 1971 TV movie Brian's Song, as the speaker who introduced Gale Sayers at the awards banquet where Sayers was named Rookie of the Year.

Los Angeles television market
Nahan was a sports anchor in the Los Angeles television market for roughly 30 years, with KABC (1968-77), KNBC (1977-86) and KTLA (1988-99). He also spent time with radio stations KABC, KXTA, and KFWB. He was involved with the Los Angeles Dodgers' pregame show, from which he retired after the 2004 season.

Death of Stu Nahan
Stu Nahan died of lymphoma, a type of cancer.
Stu Nahan was 81 years old at the time of his death.

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Sidney Sheldon - Writer

Hollywood Walk of Fame 

Sidney Sheldon BookSidney Sheldon Book
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Sidney SheldonSidney Sheldon (February 11, 1917 – January 30, 2007) was an American writer who won awards in three careers—a Broadway playwright, a Hollywood TV and movie screenwriter, and a best-selling novelist. His TV works spanned a 20-year period during which he created I Dream of Jeannie (1965-70), Hart to Hart (1979-84), and The Patty Duke Show (1963-66), but it was not until after he turned 50 and began writing best-selling novels such as Master of the Game (1982), The Other Side of Midnight (1973) and Rage of Angels (1980) that he became most famous.

Death of Sidney Sheldon:
Sheldon died from complications arising from pneumonia at Eisenhower Medical Center in Rancho Mirage, California
Sidney Sheldon was 89 years old at the age of his death.

He was cremated and buried in Westwood Memorial Park in Los Angeles.

He struggled with bipolar disorder for years; he contemplated suicide at 17 (talked out of it by his father who discovered him), as detailed in his autobiography published in 2005, The Other Side of Me.

Saddam Hussein

Saddam HusseinSaddam Hussein (April 28, 1937 – December 30, 2006), was the President of Iraq from July 16, 1979, until April 9, 2003

Saddam was hanged on the first day of Eid ul-Adha, December 30, 2006, despite his wish to be shot (which he felt would be more dignified). The execution was carried out at "Camp Justice," an Iraqi army base in Kadhimiya, a neighborhood of northeast Baghdad. The execution was videotaped on a mobile phone, showing Saddam being taunted before his hanging. The video was leaked to electronic media, becoming the subject of global controversy.

* Comment closed.  hollywoodmemoir.com doesn't discuss politics.

Steve Irwin

Steve Irwin CD Book Memorabilia
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Steve Irwin RememberStephen Robert Irwin (February 22, 1962 – September 4, 2006), known simply as Steve Irwin and nicknamed "The Crocodile Hunter", was an Australian wildlife expert and television personality. He achieved world-wide fame from the television program The Crocodile Hunter, an internationally broadcast wildlife documentary series co-hosted with his wife Terri Irwin. Together with her, he also co-owned and operated Australia Zoo, founded by his parents in Beerwah, Queensland.

Steve Irwin's Cause of Death:
Steve Irwin died in 2006 after being fatally pierced in the chest by a stingray barb. Steve Irwin was 44 years old at the time of his death.

Born: 22 February 1962 Essendon, Victoria, Australia
Died: 4 September 2006 (aged 44) Batt Reef, Queensland, Australia
Occupation: Naturalist, Zoologist, Conservationist, Television Personality
Spouse: Terri Irwin, Children? Bindi Sue Irwin, Robert (Bob) Clarence Irwin
Website: CrocodileHunter.com.au

Syd Barrett - Founding member of Pink Floyd dies 60

Syd BarrettRoger Keith "Syd" Barrett (January 6, 1946 – July 7, 2006) was an English singer, songwriter, guitarist and artist. He is most remembered as a founding member of British progressive rock band Pink Floyd, providing major musical and stylistic direction in their early work, although he left the group in 1968 amidst speculations of mental illness exacerbated by heavy drug use.

Death of Syd Barrett
Barrett died on Friday 7 July 2006 at his home in Cambridge. He died of pancreatic cancer, but this was usually reported as "complications from diabetes." The occupation on his death certificate was given as "retired musician."

According to a local Cambridge newspaper, Barrett left approximately £1.25 million to his two brothers and two sisters. This income was apparently largely acquired via royalties from Pink Floyd compilations and live recordings which featured songs he had written whilst with the band.

A tribute concert was held at the Barbican Centre, London on 10 May 2007 with Robyn Hitchcock, Captain Sensible, Damon Albarn, Chrissie Hynde, Kevin Ayers and his Pink Floyd bandmates performing (albeit not on stage at the same time for the last).

Slobodan Milosevic, President of Serbia, found dead 64

slobodan milosevicSlobodan Milosevic (August 29, 1941, Yugoslavia – March 11, 2006, The Hague, Netherlands) was President of Serbia and of Yugoslavia. He served as the President of Serbia from 1989 until 1997 and as President of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia from 1997 to 2000. He also led the Socialist Party of Serbia from its foundation in 1990.

Death of Slobodan Milosevic
Slobodan Milosevic was found dead in his cell on March 11, 2006, in the UN war crimes tribunal's detention center, located in the Scheveningen section of The Hague.

Autopsies soon established that Slobodan Milosevic had died of a heart attack. He had been suffering from heart problems and high blood pressure. However, many suspicions were voiced to the effect that the heart attack had been caused or made possible deliberately.

Shelley Winters, actress

Hollywood Walk of FamerAcademy Award Winner Oscar Award WinnersEmmy Award WinnerGolden Globe winner

Shelley Winters Movies
From Amazon.com: Shelley Winters DVD

Shelley WintersShelley Winters (August 18, 1920 – January 14, 2006) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American actress. 

Winters died on January 14, 2006 of heart failure at the Rehabilitation Centre of Beverly Hills at the age of 85 a few hours after she married DeFord; she had suffered a heart attack on October 14, 2005. Ex-husband Anthony Franciosa died of a stroke five days later.

Academy awards

  • 1951 Best Actress in a Leading Role A Place in the Sun - Nominated
  • 1959 Best Actress in a Supporting Role The Diary of Anne Frank - won
  • 1965 Best Actress in a Supporting Role A Patch of Blue - won
  • 1972 Best Actress in a Supporting Role The Poseidon Adventure - nominated

Shelley Winters From "The Balcony" (1963)

Steve Allen - First Tonight Show Host

Hollywood Walk of FamerHollywood Walk of Famer

Buy from Amazon.com: Steve Allen Books

Steve Allen Dead comedianStephen Valentine Patrick William Allen (December 26, 1921 – October 30, 2000) was an American musician, comedian and writer. As the first host of The Tonight Show, Allen was instrumental in innovating the concept of the television talk show, and is often called the father of television talk shows.

Death of Steve Allen
On October 30, 2000, Allen was driving to his son's home in Encino, California when his car was struck by another vehicle backing out of a driveway. Neither Allen nor the other driver believed they were injured, and damage to both vehicles was minimal; so the two exchanged insurance information and Allen continued on. Shortly after arriving at his son's home, Allen did not feel quite right and decided to take a nap. While napping, Allen suffered a massive heart attack and was pronounced dead shortly after 8 p.m. Autopsy results concluded that the traffic accident earlier in the day had caused a blood vessel in Allen's chest to rupture causing blood to leak into the sac surrounding the heart. This condition is known as hemopericardium. In addition, Allen also suffered four broken ribs as a result of the accident. Allen was 78 years old, and is interred in Forest Lawn Memorial Park-Hollywood Hills in Los Angeles.

Steve Allen on The Tonight Show (Rare Clip)

Buy from Amazon.com: Steve Allen Books  

Biography

Early life
Allen was born in New York City, the son of Isabelle (née Donohue), a vaudeville comedienne who performed under the name Belle Montrose, and Carroll Allen, a vaudeville performer who used the stage name Billy Allen.[1] Allen was raised on the South side of Chicago by his mother's Irish Catholic family. Milton Berle once called Allen's mother "the funniest woman in vaudeville".

Allen's first radio job was on station KOY in Phoenix, Arizona after he left Arizona State Teachers' College (now Arizona State University) in Tempe, Arizona while still a sophomore. He enlisted in the US Army during World War II and was trained as an infantryman. He spent his service time at Camp Roberts, near Monterrey, California, and did not serve overseas. Allen returned to Phoenix before deciding to move back to California.

Career
Allen became an announcer for KFAC in Los Angeles then moved to the Mutual Broadcasting System in 1946, talking the station into airing a five night a week comedy show called "Smile Time", co-starring Wendell Noble. Allen had an opportunity to move to CBS Radio's KNX in Los Angeles and did so. His music and talk format gradually changed to include more talk to his half hour show, boosting his popularity and creating standing room only studio audiences. During one episode of the show, reserved primarily for an interview with Doris Day, his guest star failed to appear. Instead Allen picked up a microphone and went into the audience to ad lib for the first time. In 1950 and for 13 weeks his show substituted for Our Miss Brooks, for the first time exposing Allen to a national audience. Allen next went to New York to work for TV station WCBS.

He achieved national attention when he was pressed into service at the last minute to host Arthur Godfrey's Talent Scouts when its host was unable to appear. Allen turned one of Godfrey's live Lipton commercials upside down, preparing tea and instant soup on camera, then pouring both into Godfrey's ukulele. With the audience (including Godfrey watching from Miami) uproariously and thoroughly entertained, Allen gained major recognition as a comedian and host. Leaving CBS, he created a late-night New York talk-variety TV program in 1953 for what is now WNBC-TV. The following year, on September 27, 1954, the show went on the full NBC network as The Tonight Show, with fellow radio personality Gene Rayburn (who later went on to host hit game shows such as Match Game) as the original announcer. The show ran from 11:15 pm to 1:00 am on the east coast.

While Today Show developer Pat Weaver is often credited as Tonight's creator, Allen often pointed out that the show was previously "created" — by himself — as a local New York show. "This is Tonight, and I can't think of too much to tell you about it except I want to give you the bad news first: this program is going to go on forever", Allen told his nationwide audience that first evening. "Boy, you think you're tired now. Wait until you see one o'clock roll around."

It was as host of The Tonight Show that Allen pioneered the 'man on the street' interviews and audience-participation comedy breaks that have become commonplace on late-night TV. In 1956, while still hosting Tonight, Allen added a Sunday-evening variety show scheduled directly against The Ed Sullivan Show on CBS and Maverick on ABC. One of Allen's guests was comedian Johnny Carson, a future successor to Allen as host of The Tonight Show; among Carson's material during that appearance was a portrayal of how a poker game between Allen, Sullivan and Maverick star James Garner, all impersonated by Carson, would transpire. Allen's programs helped the careers of singers Steve Lawrence and Eydie Gorme, who were regulars on his early Tonight Show, and Sammy Davis, Jr..

In 1956 NBC offered Allen a new, prime-time Sunday night Steve Allen Show aimed at dethroning CBS's top-rated Ed Sullivan Show. The show included a typical run of star performers including early TV appearances by Elvis Presley and Jerry Lee Lewis. However, Allen, a pianist whose love of jazz influenced all his TV shows and the music presented on them, had a strong personal distaste for Rock 'n Roll music. He "came from the sheet music era, where songwriters crafted compositions that anyone could play around the piano at home." For him, the "nonsense lyrics" of rock 'n' roll "were expressions of the semi-coherent sexual frenzy barely contained within the recordings and live performances. Rock 'n' roll was about the excitement the artists pitched and the kids caught; it wasn't supposed to hold up when lyrics were amputated from the big beat. But that comic bit was just one of Allen's misdemeanors."[3] He often presented skits ridiculing rock musicians. For instance, controversy surrounded his decision to present Elvis Presley wearing a white bow tie and black tails and singing Hound Dog to a live bassett hound for comedic effect. On the other hand, Allen was the first television show host to present many African American jazz musicians. Allen also provided a nationwide audience for his famous 'man on the street' comics, such as Pat Harrington, Jr., Don Knotts, Louis Nye, Bill Dana, Dayton Allen and Tom Poston. All were relatively obscure performers prior to their stints with Allen, and went on to stardom.

Allen remained host of "Tonight" for three nights a week (Monday and Tuesday nights were taken over by Ernie Kovacs) until early 1957, when he left the "Tonight" show to devote his attention to the Sunday night program. It was his (and NBC's) hope that the Steve Allen show could defeat Ed Sullivan in the ratings. While he did defeat Sullivan on a few occasions, Sullivan continued to dominate. But ironically, what the critics had called an epic battle of two talk giants ended up with both beaten handily by the western Maverick. In September 1959, Allen relocated to Los Angeles, and left Sunday night television. Back in LA, he continued to write songs, hosted other variety shows, and wrote books and articles about comedy.

The 1985 documentary film, Kerouac, the Movie, starts and ends with footage of Jack Kerouac reading from On The Road as Allen accompanies on soft jazz piano, from The Steve Allen Plymouth Show in 1959. "Are you nervous?" Allen asks him; Kerouac answers nervously, "Naw."

Allen helped the recently invented Polaroid camera become popular by demonstrating its use in live commercials, and amassed a huge windfall for his work because he had opted to be paid in Polaroid Corporation stock.

From 1962 to 1964, Allen re-created the Tonight Show on a new late-night Steve Allen Show syndicated by Westinghouse TV. The show, taped in Hollywood, was marked by the same wild and unpredictable stunts, comedy skits that often extended down the street to a supermarket known as the Hollywood Ranch Market. He also presented Southern California eccentrics, including health food advocate Gypsy Boots and an early musical performance by Frank Zappa. One notable program which Westinghouse refused to distribute featured Lenny Bruce, during the time the comic was repeatedly being arrested on obscenity charges; footage from this program was first telecast in 1998 in a Bruce documentary aired on HBO. Regis Philbin took over hosting the Westinghouse show in 1964, but only briefly.

The theater in Hollywood was billed as the "Steve Allen Playhouse" at the corner of La Mirada and Vine, and was an old vaudeville theater. It was built in 1906, and was the theater where Bob Hope did his first stand-up act, and was also the theater for filming the "You Bet Your Life" program with Groucho Marx. During a renovation, the entire interior of the building was burned out, and it is now a mental health clinic.

The show also featured plenty of jazz played by Allen and members of the show's band, the Donn Trenner Orchestra, which included such virtuoso musicians as guitarist Herb Ellis and flamboyantly comedic hipster trombonist Frank Rosolino (whom Allen credited with originating the 'Hiyo!' chant later popularized by Ed McMahon). While the show was not an overwhelming success in its day, David Letterman, Steve Martin, Harry Shearer, Robin Williams and a number of other prominent comedians have cited Allen's 'Westinghouse show', which they watched as teenagers, as highly influential on their own comedic visions.

Allen later produced a second half-hour show for Westinghouse titled Jazz Scene which featured West Coast jazz musicians such as Rosolino, Stan Kenton and Teddy Edwards. The short-lived show was hosted by Oscar Brown, Jr..

Allen hosted a number of television programs up until the 1980s, including the game show I've Got a Secret (replacing original host Garry Moore) in 1964 and The New Steve Allen Show in 1961. He was a regular on the popular panel game show What's My Line? (where he coined the popular phrase, "Is it bigger than a breadbox?") from 1953 to 1954 and returned frequently as a panelist after Fred Allen died in March, 1956 until the series ended in 1967. In the summer of 1967, he brought most of the regulars from over the years back with "The Steve Allen Comedy Hour", featuring the debuts of Rob Reiner, Richard Dreyfuss, and John Byner, and featuring Ruth Buzzi, who would become famous soon after in "Laugh-In". In 1968-71 he returned to syndicated nightly variety-talk, with the same wacky stunts that would influence David Letterman in later years, including becoming a human hood ornament, jumping into vats of oatmeal and cottage cheese, and beinng lathered with dog food, allowing dogs backstage to feast on the free food. Allen in those two years also introduced Albert Brooks and Steve Martin for the first time to a national audience. A syndicated version of I've Got A Secret hosted by Allen and featuring panelists Pat Carroll and Richard Dawson premiered in local syndication in 1972, taped in Hollywood. In 1977 he produced Steve Allen's Laugh-Back, a syndicated series combining vintage Allen film clips with new talk-show material reuniting his 1950s TV gang. From 1986 through 1988, Allen hosted a daily 3-hour comedy show that was heard nationally on the NBC Radio Network, featuring sketches and America's best known comedians as regular guests. His co-host was radio personality Mark Simone, and they were joined frequently by comedy writers Larry Gelbart, Herb Sargent and Bob Einstein.

Allen was an accomplished composer who wrote over 10,000 songs. In one famous stunt, he made a bet with singer-songwriter Frankie Laine that he could write 50 songs a day for a week. Composing on public display in the window of a Hollywood music store, Allen met the quota, winning $1,000 from Laine. One of the songs, Let's Go to Church Next Sunday, was recorded by both Perry Como and Margaret Whiting. Allen's best-known songs are "This Could Be the Start of Something Big" and "The Gravy Waltz", which won a Grammy Award in 1963 for best jazz composition. He also wrote lyrics for the standards "Picnic" and "South Rampart Street Parade". Allen composed the score to the Paul Mantee imitation James Bond film A Man Called Dagger (1967) with the score orchestrated by Ronald Stein.

Allen was also an actor. He wrote and starred in his first film, the Mack Sennett comedy compilation Down Memory Lane, in 1949. His most famous film appearance is in 1955's The Benny Goodman Story, in the title role. The film, while an average biopic of its day, was heralded for its music, featuring many alumni of the Goodman band. Allen later recalled his one contribution to the film's music, used in the film's early scenes: the accomplished Benny Goodman could no longer produce the sound of a clarinet beginner, and that was the only sound Allen could make on a clarinet!

Allen could also play a trumpet--sort of. He wrote and recorded a tune called "Impossible" in which he tries to play it straight, but continues to bust up laughing. (The recording has been played on the Dr. Demento radio show.)

From 1977 to 1981, Allen was the producer of the award-winning PBS series, Meeting of Minds — a "talk show" with actors playing the parts of notable historical figures, and Steve Allen as the host. This series pitted the likes of Socrates, Marie Antoinette, Thomas Paine, Sir Thomas More, Attila the Hun, Karl Marx, Emily Dickinson, Charles Darwin, and Galileo Galilei in dialogue and argument. This was the show Allen wanted to be remembered for, because he believed that the issues and characters were timeless, and would survive long after his passing. This may be more an indictment of the denigration of popular tastes, of which Allen himself wrote about in his last book, "Vulgarians at the Gates", than any obtuseness on the shows' part.

Allen was a comedy writer, and author of more than 50 books, including Dumbth, a commentary on the American educational system, and Steve Allen on the Bible, Religion, and Morality. He also wrote book-length commentaries on show-business personalities ('Funny People,' 'More Funny People'). Perhaps influenced by his son's involvement with a religious cult, he became an outspoken critic of organized religion and an active member of such humanist and skeptical organizations as the Council for Media Integrity, a group which debunked pseudo-scientific claims. (for more about Allen's skepticism, see Paul Kurtz, "A Tribute to Steve Allen", Skeptical Inquirer magazine, January/February 2001.)

Allen was also notoriously contemptuous of rock 'n' roll music, although he was showman enough to scoop Ed Sullivan by being one of the first to present Elvis Presley on network television (after Presley had appeared on the Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey Stage Show and Milton Berle shows). "Allen found a way ... to satisfy the puritans. He assured viewers that he would not allow Presley 'to do anything that will offend anyone.' NBC announced that a 'revamped, purified and somewhat abridged Presley' had agreed to sing while standing reasonably still, dressed in black tie." In fact, on this occasion Allen had Elvis wear a top hat and the white tie and tails of a 'high-class' musician while singing "Hound Dog" to an actual hound, who was similarly attired. According to Jake Austen, "the way Steve Allen treated Elvis Presley was his federal crime. Allen thought Presley was talentless and absurd, and so he decided to goof on him. Allen set things up so that Presley would show his contrition by appearing in a tuxedo and singing his new song 'Hound Dog' to an elderly basset hound..." Elaine Dundy says that Allen smirkingly presented Elvis "with a roll that looks exactly like a large roll of toilet paper with, says Allen, the 'signatures of eight thousand fans.' " Presley looked "at Steve as if to say: 'It's all right. I’ve been made a worse fool in my life,' and after he patted the basset hound he is about to sing Hound Dog to, he wiped his hands on his trousers as if to wipe away Steve Allen, the dog and the whole show." Guitarist Scotty Moore later said Elvis and the members of his band were "all angry about their treatment the previous night". "The next day, as Elvis entered the RCA studios to record 'Hound Dog,' fans greeted him with signs that declared, 'We Want the Real Elvis' and 'We Want the Gyrating Elvis.' In the press, critics were no kinder with the singer than they had ever been, this time pronouncing him a 'cowed kid' who had demonstrated, once again, that he 'couldn’t sing or act a lick.' " In a column in Newsweek, John Lardner wrote, " 'Like Huckleberry Finn, when the widow put him in a store suit and told him not to gap or scratch,' [Elvis] had been 'fouled' by NBC's attempt to 'civilize him ... for the good of mankind.' " Presley often referred to the Allen show as the most ridiculous performance of his career. The singer "was later featured in a mediocre cowboy sketch with Allen, Andy Griffith, and Imogene Coca. As 'Tumbleweed Presley' his big joke was 'I'm warning you galoots, don't step on my blue suede boots.' " That apparent mockery was consistent with other situations in which Allen had singers in such comic scenarios on his show, in contrast to the simple "singing in front of a curtain" style of the Sullivan show. The house singers on the early Tonight show were subjected to many such stunts.

It must be remembered that Allen was in his late thirties at the time, and was brought up in his formative years with a big band/jazz perspective. Stan Freberg and others of his generation also comically mocked rock 'n' roll at the time, but credit must be given for simply having the artists on in the first place. Rock 'n' roll was just coming into its own, and the nation itself didn't embrace it collectively at first, particularly folks like Allen who were brought up in the big band/crooner era. At the very least, he was an unintentional trailblazer of rock simply by breaking in new artists, per Sullivan. Jerry Lee Lewis was so touched by Allen's booking of him for the first time to a national audience that he named his first son Steve Allen Lewis after him.

Allen also had many black jazz artists on his early Tonight show, all exposed to a national audience for the first time, including Earl Hines, Billie Holiday, Bobby Short, Coleman Hawkins, Lionel Hampton, Sarah Vaughn, Thelonius Monk, Dizzy Gillespie, and Count Basie. Allen was honored with numerous awards from black organizations for that very same trailblazing.

Allen has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame: a TV star at 1720 Vine St. and a radio star at 1537 Vine St.

Personal life
Allen's second wife was actress Jayne Meadows, daughter of Christian missionaries, and sister to actress Audrey Meadows. The marriage of Allen and Meadows produced one son. They were married from 1954 until his death in 2000. Allen had three children, Steve Allen Jr., Brian Allen, and David Allen, from an earlier marriage to Dorothy Goodman that ended in divorce.

Despite his Catholic upbringing, Allen was a secular humanist and Humanist Laureate for the Academy of Humanism, a member of CSICOP and the Council for Secular Humanism. He was a student and supporter of general semantics, recommending it in Dumbth and giving the Alfred Korzybski Memorial Lecture in 1992. Allen was a supporter of world government and served on the World Federalist Association Board of Advisers. In spite of his liberal position on free speech, his later concerns about the smuttiness he saw on radio and television, particularly the programs of Howard Stern, caused him to make proposals restricting the content of programs, allying himself with the Parents Television Council. Coincidentally, his full-page ad on the subject appeared in newspapers a day or two before his unexpected death. Allen had been making speeches in which he referred to himself as an "involved Presbyterian".

Allen made a last appearance on the Tonight show on September 27, 1994, for the show's 40th anniversary broadcast. Jay Leno was effusive in praise, and actually knelt down and kissed his ring.

Shows
Songs for Sale (1950–1952)
The Steve Allen Show (1950)
What's My Line? (regular panelist, 1953–1954)
Talent Patrol (1953–1955)
The Tonight Show (1954–1957, NBC)
The Steve Allen Westinghouse Show (1962-1968)
I've Got a Secret (1964–1967)
The Steve Allen Show (Filmways production, 1968-69)
Match Game (panelist, 1974)
Meeting of Minds (1977–1981, PBS)
Steve Allen Comedy Hour (1980–1981)
The Start of Something Big (1985–1986)

Songs
"Theme from Picnic"
"This Could Be the Start of Something Big"
"The Gravy Waltz"
"The Saturday Evening Post"

Books
Bop Fables (1955)
Fourteen for Tonight (1955)
Short story collection
The Funny Men (1956)
Wry on the Rocks (1956)
Poetry
The Girls on the Tenth Floor and Other Stories (1958)
1970 printing: ISBN 0-8369-3608-6
The Question Man... (1959)
Mark It and Strike It: An Autobiography (1960)
Not All of Your Laughter, Not All of Your Tears (1962)
Dialogues in Americanism (1964)
with L. Brent Bozell, Jr., William F. Buckley, Jr., Robert M. Hutchins, James MacGregor Burns, and Willmoore Kendall
Letter to a Conservative (1965)
The Ground is Our Table (1966)
Bigger Than A Breadbox (1967)
The Flash of Swallows (1969)
The Wake (1972)
ISBN 0-385-07608-8
Princess Snip-Snip and the Puppy-Kittens (1973)
Curses! or... How Never to Be Foiled Again (1973)
ISBN 0-87477-008-4
What To Say When It Rains (1974)
ISBN 0-8431-0357-4
Schmock-Schmock! (1975)
ISBN 0-385-09664-X
Meeting of Minds (1978)
ISBN 0-517-53383-9
1989 printing: ISBN 0-87975-550-4
Chopped-Up Chinese (1978)
Ripoff: A Look at Corruption in America (1979)
With Roslyn Bernstein and Donald H. Dunn
ISBN 0-8184-0249-0
Meeting of Minds, Second Series (1979)
ISBN 0-517-53894-6
1989 printing: ISBN 0-87975-565-2
Explaining China (1980)
ISBN 0-517-54062-2
Funny People (1981)
ISBN 0-8128-2764-3
Beloved Son: A Story of the Jesus Cults (1982)
ISBN 0-672-52678-6
More Funny People (1982)
ISBN 0-8128-2884-4
How to Make a Speech (1986)
ISBN 0-07-001164-8
How to Be Funny: Discovering the Comic You (1987)
With Jane Wollman
ISBN 0-07-001199-0
1992 printing: ISBN 0-87975-792-2
1998 revised edition: ISBN 1-57392-206-4
The Passionate Nonsmoker's Bill of Rights: The First Guide to Enacting Nonsmoking Legislation (1989)
With Bill Adler, Jr.
ISBN 0-688-06295-4
"Dumbth": And 81 Ways to Make Americans Smarter (1989)
ISBN 0-87975-539-3
1998 revised edition: ISBN 1-57392-237-4
Meeting of Minds, Vol. III (1989)
ISBN 0-87975-566-0
Meeting of Minds, Vol. IV (1989)
ISBN 0-87975-567-9
The Public Hating: A Collection of Short Stories (1990)
ISBN 0-942637-22-4
Steve Allen on the Bible, Religion & Morality (1990)
ISBN 0-87975-638-1
Hi-Ho, Steverino: The Story of My Adventures in the Wonderful Wacky World of Television (1992)
ISBN 0-942637-55-0
large-print edition: ISBN 1-56054-521-6
More Steve Allen on the Bible, Religion & Morality (1993)
ISBN 0-87975-736-1
Make 'em Laugh (1993)
ISBN 0-87975-837-6
Reflections (1994)
ISBN 0-87975-904-6
The Man Who Turned Back the Clock, and Other Short Stories (1995)
ISBN 1-57392-002-9
The Bug and the Slug in the Rug (1995)
ISBN 1-880851-17-2
But Seriously...: Steve Allen Speaks His Mind (1996)
ISBN 1-57392-090-8
Steve Allen's Songs: 100 Lyrics with Commentary (1999)
ISBN 0-7864-0736-0
Steve Allen's Private Joke File (2000)
ISBN 0-609-80672-6
Vulgarians at the Gate: Trash TV and Raunch Radio—Raising the Standards of Popular Culture (2001)
ISBN 1-57392-874-7
Allen's series of mystery novels "starring" himself and wife Jayne Meadows were in part ghostwritten by Walter J. Sheldon, and later Robert Westbrook

The Talk Show Murders (1982)
ISBN 0-440-08471-7
Murder on the Glitter Box (1989)
ISBN 0-8217-2752-4
Murder in Manhattan (1990)
ISBN 0-8217-3033-9
Murder in Vegas (1991)
ISBN 0-8217-3462-8
The Murder Game (1993)
ISBN 0-8217-4115-2
Murder on the Atlantic (1995)
ISBN 0-8217-4647-2
Wake Up to Murder (1996)
ISBN 1-57566-090-3
Die Laughing (1998)
ISBN 1-57566-241-8
Murder in Hawaii (1999)
ISBN 1-57566-375-9

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Steve Reeves - Bodybuilder, Actor - Greek God, Hercules

Steve Reeves DVDSteve Reeves Movie
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Steve ReevesStephen L. Reeves (January 21, 1926 – May 1, 2000), was an American bodybuilder, actor, and author. Steve Reeves known as a pioneer who inspired Hollywood musclemen such as Sylvester Stallone and Arnold Schwarzenegger

Death of Steve Reeves
Steve Reeves died at a hospital in San Diego of complications from lymphoma, a type of cancer.
Stephen Reeves was 74 years old at the time of his death.

Childhood
Born in Glasgow, Montana, Steve Reeves moved to California at the age of 10 with his mother Goldie, after his father Lester Dell Reeves died in a farming accident. Reeves developed an interest in bodybuilding while in high school and trained at Ed Yarick's gym in Oakland. By the time he was 17 he had developed a Herculean build, long before the rise in general interest in bodybuilding. After graduating from high school, he entered the Army during the latter part of World War II, and served in the Pacific.

 Steve Reeves DVDSteve Reeves Movie
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Bodybuilding
Reeves won the following bodybuilding titles:

1946 - Mr. Pacific Coast
1947 - Mr. Western America
1947 - Mr. America
1948 - Mr. World
1950 - Mr. Universe
By his own account, his best cold (unpumped) measurements at the peak of his bodybuilding activity were:

Height: 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight: 216
Neck: 18 1/4"
Chest: 52"
Waist: 29"
Biceps: 18 1/4"
Thighs: 26"
Calves: 18 1/4"
Reeves was known for his "V-taper" and for the great width of his shoulders, which Armand Tanny once measured at 23 1/2" using outside calipers.

Arnold Schwarzenegger's Encyclopedia of Modern Bodybuilding states:

By [the 1940s] the distinction between lifting weights purely for strength and training with weights to shape and proportion the body had been clearly made. ... However, bodybuilding still remained an obscure sport. No champion was known to the general public--that is, until Steve Reeves came along. Reeves was the right man in the right place at the right time. He was handsome, personable, and had a magnificent physique. Survivors from the Muscle Beach era recall how crowds used to follow Reeves when he walked along the beach, and how people who knew nothing about him would simply stop and stare, awestruck.

Acting
After his military service, Reeves decided to try his hand at acting, having been told endlessly that he had the rugged good looks of a Hollywood star. After some intensive actor training, he came to the attention of film director Cecil B. De Mille, who considered him for the part of Samson in Samson and Delilah (1949). After a dispute over his physique in which De Mille and the studio wanted Reeves to lose 15 pounds of muscle, the part finally went to Victor Mature.

In 1954 he had a co-starring role in his first major motion picture, the musical Athena playing Jane Powell's boyfriend. The same year Reeves had a small role as a cop in the Ed Wood film Jail Bait. This is one of the few opportunities to hear Reeves' voice as most of his later films were dubbed. Reeves' appearance in Athena prompted Italian director Pietro Francisci's daughter to suggest him for the role of Hercules in her father's upcoming movie. In 1957, Reeves went to Italy and played the title character in Francisci's Hercules, which was released in Italy in February 1958 and in the U.S. in July 1959. The film's cinematographer Mario Bava claimed credit for suggesting that Reeves grow a beard for the role. Following the U.S. release, the film was an enormous hit and created a new sub-genre of the sword and sandal film (also known as the peplum film): the 'Hercules' or 'strong man' movie. The film is now in public domain and can be downloaded from the Internet Archive.

From 1959 through 1964, Reeves went on to appear in a string of sword and sandal movies, and although he is best known for his portrayal of the Greek hero Hercules, he played the character only twice - in the 1958 film Hercules and the sequel Hercules Unchained (released in the U.S. in 1960). He played a number of other characters on screen, including Sir Edward George Bulwer-Lytton's Glaucus of Pompeii; Goliath (also called Emiliano); Tatar hero Hadji Murad; Romulus, the legendary founder of Rome (opposite Gordon Scott as his twin brother Remus); the famous Olympian and war-time messenger of the Battle of Marathon, Pheidippides (The Giant of Marathon); pirate and self-proclaimed governor of Jamaica Captain Henry Morgan; and Karim, the Thief of Baghdad. Twice he played Aeneas of Troy and twice he played Emilio Salgari's Malaysian hero, Sandokan.

Paramount considered Reeves for the title role of their film version of the Broadway musical Li'l Abner in 1958, but the part eventually went to Peter Palmer. After the box office success of Hercules, Reeves turned down a number of parts that subsequently made the careers of other actors. He was asked to star as James Bond in Dr. No (1962), which he turned down. He also declined the role that finally went to Clint Eastwood in A Fistful of Dollars (1964).

During the filming of The Last Days of Pompeii, Reeves dislocated his shoulder when his chariot crashed into a tree. Reeves pulled the joint back into its socket by himself and chose to continue filming and performing his own stunts. Swimming in a subsequent underwater escape scene he reinjured his shoulder. The injury would be aggravated by his stunt work in each successive film, ultimately leading him to retire early.

In 1968 Reeves appeared in his final film, a spaghetti western which he also co-wrote, titled A Long Ride From Hell, fulfilling his wish to make a Western before he retired. George Pal had considered him for the title role of Doc Savage: The Man of Bronze but delays in filming had the part eventually go to Ron Ely. At the peak of his career, he was the highest-paid actor in Europe. His last screen appearance was in 2000 when he appeared as himself in the made-for-television A&E Biography: Arnold Schwarzenegger - Flex Appeal.

Later life
Later in his life, Reeves promoted drug-free bodybuilding and bred horses. The last two decades of his life were spent in Valley Center (Escondido), California. He bought a ranch with his savings and lived there with his second wife Aline until her death in 1989. On May 1, 2000, Reeves died from complications of lymphoma.

Filmography
Athena (1954) an MGM musical starring Debbie Reynolds, Jane Powell, and Edmund Purdom
Jail Bait (1954) directed by Edward D. Wood Jr.
Hercules (1958) aka The Labors of Hercules
Hercules Unchained (1959) aka Hercules and the Queen of Lydia
The Giant of Marathon (1959) aka The Battle of Marathon
Goliath and the Barbarians (1959) aka Terror of the Barbarians
The Last Days of Pompeii (1959)
The White Warrior (1959) directed by Riccardo Freda
Morgan, the Pirate (1960)
The Thief of Bagdad (1960)
Duel of the Titans (1961) aka Romulus and Remus
The Trojan Horse (1961) aka The Trojan War
The Avenger (1962) aka The Last Glory of Troy
The Slave (1962) aka Son of Spartacus
Sandokan The Great (1964) directed by Umberto Lenzi
Pirates of Malaysia (1964) aka Pirates of the Seven Seas
A Long Ride From Hell (1967) spaghetti western

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Shirley Hemphill - Waitress from Whats Happening!!

Shirley Ann Hemphill (July 1, 1947 - December 10, 1999) was an American stand-up comedian and actress who was born in Asheville, North Carolina. She was best known for her role on the popular television situation comedy What's Happening!!, which ran from 1976 to 1979.

Throughout her career Shirley performed her stand-up routine on a number of popular TV shows including The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, A&E's An Evening at the Improv, BET's Black Comedy Showcase and Black Comedy Tonight. She was also a regular at The Laugh Factory comedy club in Los Angeles.

On December 10, 1999, Shirley died of kidney failure at her home in suburban Los Angeles, California. She was reportedly found dead by her gardener.

Shirley died nearly a month after her What's Happening!! co-star Mabel King

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