Major Causes of Death: Accidental | Cancer | Drug | Heart Attack | Heart Failure | Lung | Natural Causes | Suicide

FirstName_J

James Brown

Hollywood Walk of Fame Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award

 James Brown CD

James Brown RememberJames Joseph Brown (May 3, 1933 – December 25, 2006), commonly referred to as "The Godfather of Soul" and "The Hardest Working Man in Show Business," was an American entertainer recognized as one of the most influential figures in 20th century popular music. He was renowned for his shouting vocals, feverish dancing and unique rhythmic style.

James Brown's Cause of Death
James Brown died from congestive heart failure. James Brown was 73 years at the time of his death.

Birth name: May 3, 1933 James Joseph Brown, Jr.
Born: Barnwell, South Carolina, United States
Origin: Augusta, Georgia
Died: December 25, 2006 (aged 73)
Atlanta, Georgia
Genre: R&B, soul, funk, Rock and Roll
Occupation: Singer, songwriter, dancer, bandleader, record producer
Instruments: Vocal percussion, guitar, harmonica, bass, keyboards, drums and other percussion instruments
Years active 1956 – 2006
Label: Federal, King, Try Me, Smash, People, Polydor, Scotti Bros.

Joseph Barbera - Cartonist at Hanna-Barbera dies 95

Joe BarberaJoseph Roland "Joe" Barbera (March 24, 1911 – December 18, 2006) was an animator, cartoon artist, storyboard artist, television director, television producer, and co-founder, together with William Hanna, of Hanna-Barbera. The studio produced popular cartoons such as The Huckleberry Hound Show, The Flintstones, The Jetsons, Scooby-Doo, Top Cat and Yogi Bear, as well as the musical film, Charlotte's Web.

Death of Joseph Barbera
Joe Barbera died at the age of 95 of natural causes at his home in Studio City, Los Angeles on December 18, 2006, ending a seventy-year career in animation. His wife Sheila was at his side when he died.

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Early years
Joseph Barbera (pronounced bar-BEAR-uh) was born in the Little Italy section of Manhattan, New York, to immigrants of Lebanese descent.

Career

Early career
Barbera started his career as a tailor's delivery boy. During the Great Depression, he tried unsuccessfully to become a magazine cartoonist for a magazine called The NY Hits Magazine. Additionally, he once told of a letter that he wrote to Walt Disney asking for advice about getting started in the animation industry. Barbera said that Disney wrote back and replied that "its a tough business" and that he (Barbera) should seek another line of work. Undeterred by Disney's comments, Joe Barbera pressed forward.

In 1932, he joined the Van Beuren Studio as an animator and scriptwriter. He worked on cartoons such as Cubby Bear, and Rainbow Parades and also co-produced Tom and Jerry (a couple of boys, unrelated to his later cat-and-mouse series). When Van Beuren closed down in 1936, Barbera moved over to the MGM studios.

Teaming with William Hanna
Lured by a substantial salary increase, Barbera left Terrytoons and New York for the new MGM cartoon unit in California in 1937. The following year, he teamed up with William Hanna to direct theatrical short cartoons; Barbera was the storyboard/layout artist, and Hanna was in charge of the timing. Their first venture was Puss Gets the Boot (1940), the first Tom and Jerry film, which was nominated for an Academy Award for Best (Cartoon) Short Subject.

Hanna and Barbera's 17-year partnership on the Tom & Jerry series resulted in 7 Academy Awards for Best (Cartoon) Short Subject, and 14 total nominations, more than any other character-based theatrical animated series. Hanna and Barbera were placed in charge of MGM's animation division in late 1955; however, this proved short-lived as MGM closed the division in 1957. They subsequently teamed up to produce the series The Ruff & Reddy Show, under the name H-B Enterprises, soon changed to Hanna-Barbera Productions. By using the limited animation techniques, Hanna and Barbera could provide programming for networks at reduced cost.

By the late 1960s, Hanna-Barbera Productions had become the most successful television animation studio, producing hit television programs such as The Flintstones, The Jetsons, Jonny Quest, and Scooby-Doo, Where Are You!.

Later career
Hanna-Barbera had been a subsidiary of Taft Broadcasting (later Great American Communications) since 1967. The studio thrived until 1991, when it was sold to Turner Broadcasting. Hanna and Barbera stayed on as advisors and periodically worked on new Hanna-Barbera shows, including the What-a-Cartoon! series.

He served as creative consultant for the 1993 motion picture, Tom and Jerry: The Movie for Miramax Films and Film Roman. Hanna-Barbera, received eight Emmys, including the Governors Award of the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences in 1988.

Their strengths melded perfectly, critic Leonard Maltin wrote in his book Of Mice and Magic: A History of American Animated Cartoons. Barbera brought the comic gags and skilled drawing, while Hanna brought warmth and a keen sense of timing. Maltin wrote:

"This writing-directing team may hold a record for producing consistently superior cartoons using the same characters year after year - without a break or change in routine."
Hanna, who died in 2001, once said he was never a good artist but his partner could "capture mood and expression in a quick sketch better than anyone I've ever known."

After Hanna's death, Barbera remained active as an executive producer for Warner Bros. Animation on direct-to-video cartoon features as well as television series such as What's New, Scooby-Doo? and Tom and Jerry Tales. In the Tom and Jerry cartoon "The Mansion Cat" from 2000, Barbera was the houseowner's voice actor. He also wrote, co-storyboarded, co-directed and co-produced the theatrical Tom and Jerry short The KarateGuard in 2005, thus returning to his and Hanna's first successful cartoon format. His final animated project was the direct-to-video feature Tom and Jerry: A Nutcracker Tale, which came out on DVD in the U.S. on October 2, 2007.

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Jack Palance - Academy Award winning actor dies 87, 2006

Hollywood Walk of FamerOscar Award winnerGolden Glove award winner

Jack PalanceJack Palance (born Volodymyr Palahniuk; February 18, 1919 – November 10, 2006) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. With his rugged facial features, Palance was best known to modern movie audiences as both the characters of Curly and Duke in the two City Slickers movies, but his career spanned half a century of film and television appearances.

Death of Jack Palance
Jack Palance died at the age of 87, of natural causes, at his home in Montecito in Santa Barbara County.He was cremated and his ashes were retained by family and friends

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Jack Palance as a bad guy

Hollywood Walk of Fame
Palance has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6608 Hollywood Boulevard. In 1992, he was inducted into the Western Performers Hall of Fame at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Academy award and nominations
1952 – Nominated – Best Actor in a Supporting Role – Sudden Fear
1953 – Nominated – Best Actor in a Supporting Role – Shane
1992 – Won – Best Actor in a Supporting Role – City Slickers

Complete Filmography of Jack Palace

(1950-2004) (In order of production)

YearMovie title
1950Panic In The Streets
Halls of Montezuma
1952Shane
Sudden Fear
1953Second Chance
Flight To Tangier
Arrowhead
The Man In The Attic
1954Sign Of The Pagan
The Silver Chalice
1955Kiss of Fire
The Big Knife
I Died A Thousand Times
1956Attack
1957The Lonely Man
House Of Numbers
Flowers Of Mayo
1958The Man Inside
Ten Seconds To Hell
1959The Battle Of Austerlitz
1960Treno Di Natale
The Barbarian
1961The Mongols
The Last Judgement
Barabbas
1962Sword Of The Conqueror
Warriors Five
1963Contempt
Night Train To Milan
1965Once A Thief
The Spy In The Green Hat
1966The Professionals
1967To Kill A Dragon
Torture Garden
1968They Came To Rob Las Vegas
The Mercenary
The Battle Giants
Marquis De Sade: Justine
1969The Desperados
The Legion Of The Damned
Che
The McMasters
1970Monte Walsh
The Companeros
The Horsemen
1971Chato's Land
It Can Be Done, Amigo
1972Tedeum
The Short & Happy Life Of The Brothers Blue
1973Oklahoma Crude
1974Craze
1975The Four Deuces
The Great Adventure
Africa Express
1976Eva Nera
The Cop In Blue Jeans
Knell-The Bloody Avenger
Safari Express
Rulers Of The City
The Sensuous Nurse
God's Gun
1977Welcome To Blood City
Portrait Of A Hitman
1978One Man Jury
Angels Brigade
1979Cocaine Cowboys
The Shape Of Things To Come
1980Without Warning
Hawk The Slayer
1982Alone In The Dark
1987Gor
Bagdad Cafe
Outlaw Of Gor
1988Young Guns
1989Batman
Tango & Cash
1990Solar Crisis
City Slickers
1991Radio Flyer (Voice)
1992Eli's Lesson
1993Cyborg 2 - The Glass Shadow
City Slickers II: The Legend of Curly's Gold
1994Cops & Robbersons
The Swan Princess (Voice)
1998The Incredible Adventures Of Marco Polo
Treasure Island
2001Prancer Returns

Television Movies/Mini-Series

YearTelevision title
1968The Strange Case Of Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde
1973Dracula
1974The Godchild
The Hatfields & The McCoys
1975Bronk
1979The Last Ride Of The Dalton Gang
The Ivory Ape
1980The Golden Moment: An Olympic Love Story
1992Keep The Change
1993The Twilight Zone: Rod Serling's Lost Classics
1995Buffalo Girls
1997I'll Be Home For Christmas
Ebenezer
1999Sarah, Plain & Tall : Winters End
2001Living With The Dead
2004Back When We Were Grownups

Television Shows

YearTelevision title
1950Lights Out - The Man Who Couldn't Remember
1952Studio 1 - The King In Yellow
Curtain Call - Azaya
Studio 1 - Little Man, Big World
The Gulf Playhouse - The Necktie Party
1953Danger - Said The Spider To The Fly
The Web - Last Chance
Suspense - The Kiss Off
The Motorola Tv Hour - Brandenburg Gate
Suspense - Cagliostro & The Chess Player
1956Playhouse 90 - Requiem For A Heavyweight
Zane Grey Theatre - The Lariat
1957Playhouse 90 - The Last Tycoon
Playhouse 90 - The Death Of Manolete
1963The Greatest Show On Earth
1965Convoy - The Many Colours Of Courage
1966Run For Your Life - The Late Diana Hayes
Alice Through The Looking Glass - (Live Theatre)
1971Net Playhouse - Trail Of Tears
1973The Sonny & Cher Comedy Hour
1979Buck Rogers In The 25th Century - The Planet Of The Slave Girls
Unknown Powers (Presenter/Narrator)
1981Tales Of The Haunted - Evil Stalks This House
1982Ripley's Believe It Or Not (Series)
2001Night Visions - Bitter Harvest

Jane Wyatt - Three times emmy winner, Father Knows Best

Hollywood Walk of FameEmmy award winnerEmmy award winnerEmmy award winner 

Jane WyattJane Waddington Wyatt (August 12, 1910 – October 20, 2006) was a three-time Emmy-winning American actress perhaps best known for her role as the housewife and mother on the television series Father Knows Best and as Amanda Grayson, the human mother of Spock on the science fiction television show, "Star Trek".

Death of Jane Wyatt
Jane Wyatt died on October 20, 2006 of natural causes at her home in Bel-Air, California. She was 96 years old.

Though one of her early suitors was John D. Rockefeller III, Wyatt was married to investment broker Edgar Bethune Wardon from November 9, 1935 until his death on November 8, 2000, just one day short of the couple's 65th wedding anniversary. The couple met in the late 1920s when both were weekend houseguests of Franklin D. Roosevelt at Hyde Park. Wyatt was survived by two sons, and according to an obituary in The Washington Post, a third son died in infancy in the early 1940s.

Jack Warden,

Emmy Award Winner 

Jack Warden ActorJack Warden (September 18, 1920 – July 19, 2006) was an Emmy Award-winning, Academy Award-nominated American character actor.

Death of Jack Warden
Jack Warden died of heart and kidney failure in a New York hospital on July 19, 2006.
Jack Warden was 85 years old at the time of his death.

Career
Warden had his first credited film role in The Man with My Face in 1951, and in 1952 he began a three-year role in the television series Mr. Peepers. After a role as a sympathetic corporal in From Here to Eternity (1953), Warden's breakthrough film role was his performance as Juror No. 7, a salesman who wants a quick decision in a murder case, in 12 Angry Men (1957).

He received a supporting actor Emmy Award for his performance as Chicago Bears coach George Halas in Brian's Song (1971), and was nominated for Academy Awards as Best Supporting Actor for his performances in Shampoo (1975) and Heaven Can Wait (1978). He also had notable roles in such films as All the President's Men (1976), ...And Justice for All and Being There (both 1979), Used Cars (in which he played a celebrated dual role in 1980), The Verdict (1982), Problem Child (1990) and its sequel (1991), While You Were Sleeping (1995), and the Norm MacDonald film Dirty Work (1998).

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Carbon Copy (1981) trailer - Jack Warden taking a small roll here

Jack Warden's biography & filmography continues 

Warden appeared in over one hundred movies, typically playing gruff cops, sports coaches, trusted friends and similar roles, during a career which spanned six decades. His last film was 2000s The Replacements, opposite Gene Hackman and Keanu Reeves.

Personal life
Warden married French actress Vanda Dupre in 1958 and had one son, Christopher. Although they separated in the 1970s they never divorced.

Early life
Warden was born John H. Lebzelter in Newark, New Jersey, the son of Laura M. (née Costello) and John Warden Lebzelter, who was an engineer and technician. Raised in Louisville, Kentucky, he was expelled from high school for fighting and eventually fought as a professional boxer under the name Johnny Costello. He had 13 welterweight bouts but earned little money. He worked as a nightclub bouncer, tugboat deckhand and lifeguard before joining the Navy in 1938. He was stationed in China for three years with the Yangtze River Patrol.

In 1941, he joined the United States Merchant Marine; but quickly tiring of the long convoy runs, he switched to the Army in 1942 where he served as a paratrooper in the elite 101st Airborne Division during World War II. In 1944, on the eve of the D-Day invasion (during which many of his friends died), Warden shattered his leg by landing on a fence during a night-time practice jump in England. After almost a year in the hospital (during which time he read a Clifford Odets play and decided to become an actor after the end of the war), he recovered enough to participate in the Battle of the Bulge in 1944.

After leaving the military with the rank of sergeant, he moved to New York City and pursued an acting career on the G.I. Bill. He joined the company of the Dallas Alley Theater and performed on stage for five years. In 1948 he made his television debut on The Philco Television Playhouse and Studio One. He made an uncredited film debut in 1951 in You're in the Navy Now, a movie which also featured the film debuts of Lee Marvin and Charles Bronson.

Filmography
The Replacements (2000)
Bulworth (1998)
Chairman Of The Board (1998)
Dirty Work (1998)
Mighty Aphrodite (1995)
Problem Child 3: Junior in Love (1995)
While You Were Sleeping (1995)
Bullets Over Broadway (1994)
Toys (1992)
Problem Child 2 (1991)
Problem Child (1990)
The Presidio (1988)
Dead Solid Perfect (1988)(Cable TV)
Still Crazy Like a Fox (1987) (TV)
September (1987)
Crazy Like a Fox (1984) TV Series
Crackers (1984)
The Verdict (1982)
So Fine (1981)
The Great Muppet Caper (1981)
Used Cars (1980)
Being There (1979)
Topper (1979) (TV)
The Bad News Bears (1979) TV Series
...And Justice for All (1979)
Death on the Nile (1978)
Heaven Can Wait (1978)
Raid on Entebbe (1977) (TV)
The White Buffalo (1977)
All the President's Men (1976)
Jigsaw John (1976) TV Series
Shampoo (1975)
The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz (1974)
The Man Who Loved Cat Dancing (1973)
Brian's Song (1971) (TV)
Who Is Harry Kellerman and Why Is He Saying Those Terrible Things About Me? (1971)
Bye Bye Braverman (1968)
N.Y.P.D. (1967) TV Series
The Invaders (1967) TV series guest appearance
The Wackiest Ship in the Army (1965) TV Series
The Thin Red Line (1964)
Bewitched - It Shouldn't Happen To A Dog (1964) TV series Guest appearance
Donovan's Reef (1963)
The Asphalt Jungle (1961) TV Series
Wake Me When It's Over (1960)
The Twilight Zone (1960) TV series Guest appearance
That Kind of Woman (1959)
Run Silent, Run Deep (1958)
Darby's Rangers (1958 film)
12 Angry Men (1957)
From Here to Eternity (1953)
Mr. Peepers (1952) TV Series
Man with My Face (1951)
You're in the Navy Now (1951) (uncredited)  

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June Allyson - Golden Globe winner, Actress from 1940s 1950s

Hollywood Walk of FamerGolden Glove Winner 

June AllysonJune Allyson (October 7, 1917 – July 8, 2006) was a Golden Globe-winning American film and television actress, popular in the 1940s and 1950s.

Death of June Allyson
June Allyson had been in failing health since undergoing a hip-replacement surgery, and died at her home in Ojai, California on July 8, 2006. She was 88 years old. Her death was a result of pulmonary respiratory failure and acute bronchitis. Her husband of nearly 30 years, David Ashrow, was at her side.

For her contribution to the motion picture industry, June Allyson received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1537 Vine Street.

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Filmography

Features
Best Foot Forward (1943)
Thousands Cheer (1943)
Girl Crazy (1943)
Meet the People (1944)
Two Girls and a Sailor (1944)
Music for Millions (1944)
Her Highness and the Bellboy (1945)
The Sailor Takes a Wife (1945)
Two Sisters from Boston (1946)
Till the Clouds Roll By (1946)
The Secret Heart (1946)
High Barbaree (1947)
Good News (1947)
The Bride Goes Wild (1948)
The Three Musketeers (1948)
Words and Music (1948)
Little Women (1949)
The Stratton Story (1949)
The Reformer and the Redhead (1950)
Right Cross (1950)
 Too Young to Kiss (1951)
The Girl in White (1952)
Battle Circus (1953)
Remains to Be Seen (1953)
The Glenn Miller Story (1953)
Executive Suite (1954)
Woman's World (1954)
Strategic Air Command (1955)
The Shrike (1955)
The McConnell Story (1955)
The Opposite Sex (1956)
You Can't Run Away from It (1956)
Interlude (1957)
My Man Godfrey (1957)
A Stranger in My Arms (1959)
They Only Kill Their Masters (1972)
Blackout (1978)
That's Entertainment! III (1994)
A Girl, Three Guys, and a Gun (2001)
 
Short subjects
Ups and Downs (1937)
Pixilated (1937)
Swing for Sale (1937)
Dime a Dance (1937)
Dates and Nuts (1937)
Not Now (1938)
 Sing for Sweetie (1938)
The Prisoner of Swing (1938)
The Knight Is Young (1938)
All Girl Revue (Short subject, 1940)
Screen Snapshots: Hollywood, City of Stars (1956)

Biography

Early life
Allyson was born Eleanor (Ella) Geisman in the Bronx, New York City to Clara Provost and Robert Geisman on October 7, 1917. Her paternal grandparents, Harry Geisman and Anna Hafner, were immigrants from Germany, although Allyson has claimed that her last name was originally "Van Geisman", and was of Dutch origin.June was six months old when her alcoholic father who'd worked as a janitor abandoned the family. Her mother worked as a telephone operator and restaurant cashier. Allyson was brought up in near poverty. At eight, a dead tree branch fell on her while she was bicycling. Several bones were broken, and doctors said she would never walk again. She underwent months of swimming exercises and regained her health.

Career
After graduating from a wheelchair to crutches to braces, she was inspired to dance by obsessively watching Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire movies. In 1938, fully recovered, she tried out for a chorus job in the Broadway show "Sing out the News." The choreographer gave her a job and a new name: Allyson, a family name, and June, for the month.

Like other musical performers in New York, the 5'1" Allyson found work in movie short subjects that were filmed there. Her first opportunity came from Educational Pictures at its Astoria, Long Island studio. Educational cast her as an ingenue opposite singer Lee Sullivan, comic dancers Herman Timberg, Jr. and Pat Rooney, Jr., and future comedy star Danny Kaye. When Educational ceased operations, Allyson moved over to Vitaphone in Brooklyn, and starred or co-starred (with dancer Hal LeRoy) in musical shorts until that studio discontinued New York production in 1940.

Allyson returned to the New York stage. After her appearance in Best Foot Forward in 1941, she was selected for the 1943 film version, and followed it up with several other musicals, including Two Sisters from Boston (1946) and Good News (1947). She also played straight roles such as Constance in The Three Musketeers (1948), the tomboy Jo March in Little Women (1949), and a nurse in Battle Circus (1953). June was very adept at opening the waterworks on cue, and many of her films incorporated a crying scene. Fellow MGM player Margaret O'Brien recalled that she and Allyson were known as "the town criers."

In 1950, June Allyson had been signed to appear opposite Fred Astaire in Royal Wedding, but had to leave the production due to pregnancy. (She was replaced initially by Judy Garland, and later Jane Powell.)

James Stewart was a frequent co-star, teaming up with Allyson in films such as The Glenn Miller Story, The Stratton Story and Strategic Air Command.

Allyson was an extremely active star in the 1940s and 1950s. She won a Golden Globe Award for her performance in the comedy Too Young To Kiss in 1951. In 1955, she was named the ninth most popular movie star in the annual Quigley Exhibitors Poll and the second most popular female star (behind Grace Kelly). She starred in 1956 with a young rising star named Jack Lemmon in a musical comedy, You Can't Run Away From It.

After her film career ended in the late 1950s, Allyson starred on television as hostess and occasional star of The DuPont Show with June Allyson. The anthology series lasted two seasons. In later years the actress appeared on popular shows such as The Love Boat and Murder, She Wrote.

Personal life
On August 19, 1945, Allyson caused Hollywood studio chiefs some consternation by marrying Dick Powell, who was 13 years her senior and had been previously married to Mildred Maund and Joan Blondell. They had two children, Pamela Allyson Powell (adopted in 1948 through the Tennessee Children's Home Society in an adoption arranged by Georgia Tann) and Richard Powell, Jr. born on December 24, 1950. The couple briefly separated in 1961, but reconciled and remained married until his death on January 2, 1963, which led to Allyson's effective retirement from the screen.

Following Powell's death, she went though a bitter court battle with her mother over custody of her children, Ricky and Pamela. Reports at the time revealed that writer/director Dirk Summers, with whom Allyson was romantically involved from 1963 to 1975, was named legal guardian for Ricky and Pamela as a result of a court petition. Members of the nascent jet-set, Allyson and Summers were frequently seen in Cap d'Antibes, Madrid, Rome and London. However, Summers refused to marry her and the relationship did not last. Allyson twice married and divorced Powell's barber, Alfred Glenn Maxwell, who she claimed physically abused her. During this time, Allyson struggled with alcoholism, which she overcame in the mid-seventies. She was married to David Ashrow, a dentist turned actor, from 1976 until her death. The couple occasionally performed together in regional theater.

Allyson returned to the Broadway stage in 1970 in the play Forty Carats and later toured in a production of No, No Nanette.

Dick Powell had been a major television player with his own production company, Four Star, owning several network shows. When he died, Allyson was left very well off and didn't need to work. She occasionally made appearances on talk and variety shows.

After Dick Powell developed kidney problems and died of cancer, June Allyson committed herself to charitable work on his behalf. She championed the importance of research in urological and gynecological diseases in seniors, and represented the Kimberly-Clark Corporation in commercials for Depend adult diapers. Her name made the headlines again when actor-turned-agent Marty Ingels publicly charged Allyson with not paying his large commission on the Depend deal. Allyson counter-charged that Ingels was harassing her with dozens of phone calls daily and nightly.

Allyson made a special appearance in 1994 in That's Entertainment III, as one of the film's narrators. She spoke about MGM's golden era, and introduced vintage film clips.

June Pointer (Pointer Sisters) dies 52

June Antoinette Pointer Whitmore (November 30, 1953 - April 11, 2006) was an American Pop/R&B singer and was a founding member of the vocal group The Pointer Sisters.

Death of June Pointer
June died at 1:10pm on April 11, 2006 at the UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles, California from bone cancer, liver cancer, and lung cancer. She died in the arms of her older sisters and brothers Ruth, Anita, Aaron, and Fritz.

Struggling with drug addiction for much of her career, June was ousted from the Pointer Sisters by 2004 as her sisters hoped and waited for her to become drug-free. Ruth's daughter filled in for June during stage performances.

Actor Jack Wild dies 53

Oliver Actor diedJack Wild (September 30, 1952 - March 2, 2006) was an English actor who achieved fame for his roles in both stage and screen productions of the Lionel Bart musical Oliver! with Ron Moody, Shani Wallis and Oliver Reed. For the latter performance (playing the Artful Dodger), he received an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor at the age of 16, but the Oscar went to Jack Albertson for his performance in The Subject Was Roses. Jack Wild appeared with actor Mark Lester in two films: Oliver! (1968) and Melody (1971).

Death of Jack Wild
Wild died on 2 March, 2006, aged 53, after a long battle with oral cancer, which he claimed was caused by his alcoholism and smoking. Diagnosed with the disease in 2000, he underwent surgery in July 2004 and had part of his tongue and both vocal cords removed. Because of this surgery, he had lost his speech and had to communicate through his wife, Clare Harding, whom he had met in a stage production of Cinderella; Jack played one of the ugly stepsisters. He is buried in Toddington Parish Cemetery.

Jean Parker - Actress (30's - 60's) Beth from Little Women

Jean Parker (August 11, 1915 – November 30, 2005) was an American movie actress.

Born as Lois Mae Green in Deer Lodge, Montana, she appeared in 70 movies from 1932 through 1966. She was discovered by Ida Koverman, secretary to MGM mogul Louis B. Mayer, after she saw a poster featuring Parker portraying Father Time. She attended Pasadena schools and graduated from John Muir High School. Her original aspirations were in the fine arts and illustration.

Death of Jean Parker
Jean Parker spent her final years in the Motion Picture and Television Country House and Hospital in Woodland Hills, California, where she died of a stroke on November 30, 2005.
Jean parker was 90 years old at the time of his death.

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Jean Parker in She Married A Cop (1939)

Jean Parker biography continues 

She had a successful career at MGM, RKO and Columbia including important roles such as the tragic Beth in the original Little Women, among many other film appearances including Frank Capra's Lady for A Day and Gabriel Over the White House; Sequoia; The Ghost Goes West, opposite Robert Donat; and Rasputin and the Empress, with fellow players, the Barrymore siblings (John, Ethel, and Lionel) in the only movie they all made together. In 1939, she starred opposite Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy in RKO's The Flying Deuces.

Parker stayed active in film throughout the 1940s, playing opposite Lon Chaney in "Dead Man's Eyes" "Detective Kitty O' Day", and a variety of other films. Parker managed her own airport and flying service with then-husband Doug Dawson in Palm Springs, California until shortly after the start of World War II. During World War II, she toured many of the veteran hospitals throughout the U.S. and performed on radio. In the 1950s, Parker co-starred opposite Edward G. Robinson in Black Tuesday; had a small but effective role in Gunfighter which starred Gregory Peck and appeared with Randolph Scott and Angela Lansbury in the western Lawless Street (1955). Her last film appearance was Apache Uprising (1966), directed by A. C. Lyles.

Parker also appeared on Broadway. In 1949 she replaced Judy Holliday in Born Yesterday on Broadway and enjoyed a successful run in this classic. Parker also appeared on Broadway opposite Bert Lahr in the play Burlesque, did summer stock in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, was on tour in the play Candlelight and Loco, and performed on stage in other professional productions.

She married Robert Lowery (who played Batman in 1949) in 1950. Two years later she gave birth to a son, Robert Lowery Hanks, an executive with the city of Los Angeles, California. Later in life, she continued a successful stint on the West Coast theatre circuit and worked as an acting coach.

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Johnny Carson Tonight Show, King of Late Night died 79

Hollywood Walk of FamerEmmy Award WinnerEmmy Award WinnerEmmy Award WinnerEmmy Award WinnerEmmy Award WinnerEmmy Award WinnerEmmy Award Winner 

John William "Johnny" Carson (October 23, 1925 – January 23, 2005) was an American actor, comedian and writer best known for his iconic status as the host of The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson for 30 years.

Death

Johnny Carson died of Emphysema.
Johnny Carson was  79 years old at the time of his death

At 6:50 AM PST on January 23, 2005, Carson died at Los Angeles' Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, of respiratory arrest arising from emphysema. Following Carson's death his body was cremated, and the ashes were given to his wife. In accordance with his family's wishes, no public memorial service was held. There were countless tributes paid to Carson upon his death, including a statement by President George W. Bush, all recognizing the deep and enduring affection held for him.

Tributes published after his death confirmed that he had been a chain-smoker. While The Tonight Show was broadcast live, he would frequently smoke cigarettes on the air; it was reported that Carson had said "these things are killing me" as far back as the 1970s.

Johnny Carson's Last TV appearance (Letterman)

Johnny Cash - 71


Johnny Cash won about 10 or more grammys (a LOT)

Johnny Cash DeathJohnny Cash (February 26, 1932 - September 12, 2003) was a Grammy Award-winning American singer-songwriter and one of the most influential musicians of the 20th century. Primarily a country music artist, his songs and sound spanned many other genres including rockabilly and rock and roll (especially early in his career), as well as blues, folk and gospel.

He sold over 90 million albums in his nearly fifty-year career and came to occupy a "commanding position in music history".

Illness & Death of Johnny Cash
In 1997, Cash was diagnosed with the neurodegenerative disease Shy-Drager syndrome. The diagnosis was later altered to autonomic neuropathy associated with diabetes. This illness forced Cash to curtail his touring. He was hospitalized in 1998 with severe pneumonia, which damaged his lungs.

Johnny Cash died less than four months after his wife June Carter Cash's death in Nashville, Tennessee. He was interred next to his wife in Hendersonville Memory Gardens near his home in Hendersonville, Tennessee. Johnny Cash was 71 years old at the time of his death.

Johnny Cash - Ring of Fire

John Ritter - Jack Tripper, Three's Company

Hollywood Walk of Fame1984 Three's CompanyGolden Globe Winner 

Hollywood CelebrityJack TripperJohn Ritter's Death
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John RitterJohnathan Southworth "John" Ritter (September 17, 1948 – September 11, 2003) was an Emmy- and Golden Globe award-winning American actor and comedian best known for his role of Jack Tripper in the sitcom Three's Company.

Death of John Ritter
John Ritter aortic dissection caused by a previously undiagnosed congenital heart defect.  John Ritter was 54 years old at the time of his death.

On September 11, 2003, Ritter collapsed while rehearsing scenes for an episode of 8 Simple Rules that was to have Henry Winkler as a guest star. He was taken across the street from the studio to Providence Saint Joseph Medical Center, where he died hours later, at the age of 54. Ritter died in the same hospital in which he was born. The cause of death was an aortic dissection caused by a previously undiagnosed congenital heart defect; Ritter's father died of a heart attack almost thirty years earlier. Years later Ritter's wife testified in court that he had had concerns for his own health because of the cause of his father's death.

Ritter was interred at Forest Lawn Cemetery in Los Angeles.

Jack Tripper Dancing Scene - After taking 2 tranquilizers

John Phillips - Papa John from The Mamas & The Papas

Mamas & papas John Philips Dead Celebrity
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Mamas & Papas

John Phillips, born John Edmund Andrew Phillips (August 30, 1935 – March 18, 2001), was an American singer, guitarist, and songwriter. Known as Papa John, Phillips was a member and leader of the singing group The Mamas & the Papas. He is the father of Jeffrey Phillips, Mackenzie Phillips, Chynna Phillips, Tamerlane Phillips, and Bijou Phillips.

Death of John Phillips
John Phillips died on March 18, 2001, aged 65, in Los Angeles of heart failure.
John Phillips was 65 year old at the time of his death.

He is interred in an outdoor crypt at Forest Lawn Cemetery (Cathedral City) near Palm Springs, California, where he had lived with his fourth wife, Farnaz. He left behind five children and a body of highly acclaimed music. He died just days after completing sessions for a new album. Phillips 66 was released posthumously in August of 2001

The Mamas and The Papas - Monday Monday
John Phillips is the one with the guitar

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Early life
Phillips was born in Parris Island, South Carolina. His father was a retired United States Marine Corps officer who won an Oklahoma bar from a fellow Marine in a poker game on the way home from Europe after World War I. His mother was Cherokee Indian and met and married Phillips' father in Oklahoma. According to Phillips' autobiography, Papa John, his father was a heavy drinker who suffered from ill health.

Growing up in Alexandria, Virginia, Phillips was inspired by Marlon Brando and other film stars to be "street tough." He formed a small gang of teenage boys, who also sang doo-wop songs. A poor student but likable kid, he was the star of the basketball team at George Washington High School (Class of 1953), one of the predecessors to today's T. C. Williams High School. He attended the U.S. Naval Academy, but left during his first (plebe) year. He also attended Hampden-Sydney College on a partial athletic scholarship, but dropped out and shortly thereafter married his first of four wives.

Susan Adams was the daughter of a wealthy Virginia family. Together they had a son called Jeffrey and a girl they named (Laura) Mackenzie Phillips.

The Mamas & the Papas
Phillips longed to have success in the music industry and traveled to New York to find a record contract in the early sixties. His first band, The Journeymen, was a folk trio. He developed his craft in Greenwich Village, during the American folk music revival, and met his future The Mamas & the Papas bandmates Denny Doherty and Cass Elliot there. Lyrics of their song "Creeque Alley" describe this period.

While touring California with The Journeymen he met his future second wife, the teenage Michelle Gilliam. Their affair finally forced the dissolution of his first marriage. Phillips was married to Michelle Phillips from 1962 to 1970. They had one child together, Chynna Phillips, the founder of the singing group Wilson Phillips.

Phillips was the primary songwriter and musical arranger of The Mamas & the Papas. Early in the band's history, John and Michelle were responsible for writing most of the band's songs. John would often come up with a melody and some lyrics and Michelle would help him complete the lyrical portion of the song. After being signed to Dunhill Records, they had several Billboard Top Ten hits during the group's short lifetime, including "California Dreamin'"; "Monday, Monday"; "I Saw Her Again"; "Creeque Alley"; and "12:30 (Young Girls Are Coming to the Canyon)". John Phillips also wrote "San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair)," the 1967 Scott McKenzie hit that was to become the Summer of Love "anthem." Phillips also wrote the oft-covered "Me and My Uncle," which was the song performed more times than any other over 30 years of Grateful Dead concerts.

The group's popularity rivaled that of The Beatles and The Rolling Stones in the late sixties. Although the band lasted only several short years with five studio albums, the music is recognized today as some of the greatest pop of the 20th century.

The Phillipses became Hollywood celebrities, living in the Hollywood Hills and socializing with stars like Jack Nicholson, Warren Beatty, and Roman Polanski. The group broke up largely because Cass Elliot wanted to go solo and because of some personal problems between Phillips, Michelle, and Denny Doherty. Michelle had been fired briefly in 1966, for having had affairs with both Denny and Gene Clark, and was replaced for two months by Jill Gibson, their producer Lou Adler's girlfriend. Although Michelle was forgiven and asked to return to the group, the personal problems would continue until the band split up in 1968. Cass Elliot went on to have a successful solo career until her death in 1974.

After: The ups and downs
Phillips released his first solo album Wolfking of L.A. in 1970. The album was not commercially successful, although it did include the minor hit "Mississippi", and Phillips began to withdraw from the limelight as his use of narcotics increased.

Actress Geneviève Waïte became wife number three in 1972. Tamerlane and Bijou Phillips entered the world during this union, which was marked by years of mutual drug abuse, infidelity and failed artistic expression. John produced a Genevieve Waite album, Romance Is On the Rise, that was quickly forgotten. Her acting career fizzled. Phillips persevered by writing music for films and Broadway, creating a musical. It was savagely criticized and closed on Broadway during previews. Phillips moved to London. He began to write new songs in 1973 when Mick Jagger encouraged him to record another solo album. It was to be released on Rolling Stones Records and funded by RSR distributor Atlantic Records. Jagger and Keith Richards would produce and play on the album, as well as former Stone Mick Taylor and future Stone Ronnie Wood. The project was derailed by Phillips' increasing use of cocaine and heroin, substances that he shot into his body, by his own admission, "almost every fifteen minutes for two years". Amazingly, he survived, yet almost everything else in his life, including the new album, was shelved.

In 1975 Phillips, still living in London, was commissioned to create the soundtrack to the Nicolas Roeg film The Man Who Fell to Earth, starring David Bowie. Phillips asked Mick Taylor to help out and the film was released in 1976. Decades later, in 2001, the tracks of the Half Stoned or The Lost Album album were released as Pay Pack & Follow a few months after Phillips death. The record is an interesting collection of vocal harmony, country and rock. Although the album offers a trip back to the 1970s, the record was not noticed by the press and general music buying audience; moreover, Phillips' untimely death prevented any marketing or tour support.

A drug trafficking conviction in 1981 brought the hot glare of public scrutiny. Phillips and his television star daughter Mackenzie made the rounds in the media, instructing kids and their parents how not to become addicts. This public relations campaign helped reduce his prison time; he bargained down to only a month in jail. Upon release, he re-formed The Mamas & the Papas, with his daughter Mackenzie Phillips, Spanky McFarlane (of the group Spanky and Our Gang) and Denny Doherty. Throughout the rest of his life, Phillips toured with various versions of the group.

In 1986, he published a best-seller, his autobiography, Papa John. He was divorced from Waite in 1985. He co-wrote a song for the Beach Boys, "Kokomo" , which became a number one hit in 1988.

In the 1990s, his years of addiction took hold; he had a liver transplant in 1992. Several months later, Phillips was photographed drinking alcohol in a bar in Palm Springs, California, as published in the National Enquirer newspaper. Phillips was questioned about the photo on the Howard Stern radio show, saying "I was just trying to 'break in' the new liver." The Mamas and the Papas were inducted into the Rock 'n Roll Hall of Fame on Jan 12th, 1998.

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Julius J. Epstein - Author of Casablanca

Julius J. Epstein (August 22, 1909 - December 30, 2000) was an American screenwriter, who had a long career, most noted for the adaptation - in partnership with his twin brother, Philip, and others —- of the unproduced play Everybody Comes to Rick's that became the screenplay for the film Casablanca (1942), for which its team of writers won an Academy Award. Following his brother's death in 1952, he continued writing, garnering two more Oscar nominations and, in 1998, a Los Angeles Film Critics Association career achievement award. His credits included Four Daughters (1938), The Bride Came C.O.D. (1941), The Man Who Came to Dinner (1942), Mr. Skeffington (1944), The Tender Trap (1955), Light in the Piazza (1962), Send Me No Flowers (1964), Pete 'n' Tillie (1972), and Reuben, Reuben (1983).

Epstein graduated from The Pennsylvania State University in 1931 with a BA in Arts and Letters. Both he and his brother wrestled for the varsity squad there.

Jack Warner, head of Warner Brothers, had a love-hate relationship with the writing duo of the Epstein brothers. He could not argue with their commercial success, but he deplored their pranks, their work habits and the hours they kept. He consistently butted heads with the two. In 1952, Warner gave the brothers' names to the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC). They never testified before the committee, but on a HUAC questionnaire, when asked if they ever were members of a "subversive organization," they responded, "Yes. Warner Brothers."

Epstein was the uncle of Leslie Epstein, director of the creative writing program at Boston University and accomplished novelist and the great-uncle of Boston Red Sox General Manager Theo Epstein.

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Screamin' Jay Hawkins - I put a spell on you

Jay Hawkins CD Jay Hawkins Death
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Screamin' jay hawkinsJalacy Hawkins, best known as Screamin' Jay Hawkins (July 18, 1929 – February 12, 2000) was an African-American singer. Famed chiefly for his powerful, operatic vocal delivery & wildly theatrical performances of songs such as "I Put a Spell on You" and "Constipation Blues," Hawkins sometimes used macabre props onstage, making him perhaps the first shock rocker.

"I Put A Spell On You"
His most successful recording, "I Put a Spell on You" (1956), was selected as one of The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll.

Death of Screamin' Jay Hawkins
Hawkins died on February 12, 2000 after surgery to treat an aneurysm. He left behind many children by many women; about 55 were known (or suspected) upon his death, and upon investigation, that number "soon became perhaps 75 offspring", according to this website. News of Hawkins' death was largely overshadowed by the deaths of Peanuts creator Charles M. Schulz, Dallas Cowboys football coach Tom Landry, and pop singer Oliver on that same day.

Screamin' Jay Hawkins - I put a spell on you, Live

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Early career
Born and raised in Cleveland, Ohio, Hawkins originally set out to become an opera singer, and has regularly cited Paul Robeson as his idol. When his initial ambitions failed, he began his career as a conventional blues singer and pianist.

He served in the U.S. Army in the Pacific Ocean during World War II, primarily as an entertainer, although he claimed to have been a POW. Hawkins was an avid and formidable boxer: in 1949, he was the middleweight boxing champion of Alaska.

In 1951, he joined guitarist Tiny Grimes for a while, and recorded a few songs with him. When Hawkins became a solo performer, he often performed in a very stylish wardrobe, featuring leopard skins, red leather and wild hats.

Later career
Hawkins had several further hits, including "Constipation Blues", "Orange Colored Sky", and "Feast of the Mau Mau". Nothing he released, however, had the monumental success of "I Put a Spell on You".

He continued to tour and record through the 1960s and 1970s, particularly in Europe, where he was very popular, but his career was not advancing in America until filmmaker Jim Jarmusch featured "I Put a Spell on You" on the soundtrack – and deep in the plot – of his film Stranger Than Paradise (1983) and then Hawkins himself as a hotel night clerk in his Mystery Train. This led to a few other movie performances, such as Álex de la Iglesia's Perdita Durango and Bill Duke's adaptation of Chester Himes' A Rage In Harlem.

His 1957 single "Frenzy" (found on the early 1980s compilation of the same name) was included in the compilation CD, "Songs in the Key of X: Music From And Inspired By The X-Files", in 1996. This song was featured in the show's season 2 episode "Humbug". It was also covered by the band Batmobile

In July 1991, Hawkins released his album Black Music for White People. The record features covers of two Tom Waits compositions; "Heart Attack and Vine" (which, later that year, was used in a European Levi's advertisement without Waits' permission, resulting in a lawsuit), and "Ice Cream Man" (which, contrary to popular belief, is a Waits original, and not a cover of the John Brim classic. Incidentally, Hawkins also covered the Waits tune "Whistlin' Past the Graveyard" for his album Somethin' Funny Goin' On.)

Hawkins also toured with The Clash and Nick Cave during this period, and not only became a fixture of blues festivals, but appeared at many film festivals as well.

His performance style earned him a loyal following — the use of a skull, a moving arm and, in his early days — a coffin added to his charisma.

Hawkins died on February 12, 2000 after surgery to treat an aneurysm. He left behind many children by many women; about 55 were known (or suspected) upon his death, and upon investigation, that number "soon became perhaps 75 offspring", according to this website. News of Hawkins' death was largely overshadowed by the deaths of Peanuts creator Charles M. Schulz, Dallas Cowboys football coach Tom Landry, and pop singer Oliver on that same day.

Discography

Selected Singles
1956 I Put a Spell On You/Little Demon
1957 You Made Me Love You/Darling, Please Forgive Me
1957 Frenzy/Person to Person
1958 Alligator Wine/There's Something Wrong With You
1958 Armpit #6/The Past [Red Top 126]
1962 I Hear Voices/Just Don't Care
1962 Ashes/Nitty Gritty - w/ Shoutin' Pat
1966 Poor Folks / Your Kind of Love
1970 Do You Really Love Me/Constipation Blues
1973 Monkberry Moon Delight/Sweet Ginny

Albums
1958 At Home with Screamin' Jay Hawkins (Okeh/Epic) - other editions entitled Screamin' Jay Hawkins and I Put a Spell on You
1965 The Night and Day of Screamin' Jay Hawkins (Planet) - also entitled In the Night and Day of Screamin' Jay Hawkins
1969 What That Is! (Philips)
1970 Because Is in Your Mind (Armpitrubber) (Philips)
1972 Portrait of a Man and His Woman (Hotline) - also entitled I Put a Spell on You and Blues Shouter
1977 I Put a Spell on You (Versatile--recordings from 1966-76)
1979 Lawdy Miss Clawdy (Koala)
1979 Screamin' the Blues (Red Lightnin') - also entitled She Put the Wammee on Me
1983 Real Life (Zeta)
1984 Screamin' Jay Hawkins and The Fuzztones Live (Midnight Records) - live
1988 At Home with Jay in The Wee Wee Hours (Midnight Records) - live
1988 Live & Crazy (Blue Phoenix) - live
1990 The Art of Screamin' Jay Hawkins (Spivey)
1991 Black Music For White People (Bizarre/Straight Records/Planet Records)
1991 I Shake My Stick at You (Aim)
1993 Stone Crazy (Bizarre/Straight/Planet)
1994 Somethin' Funny Goin' On (Bizarre/Straight/Planet)
1993 Rated X (Sting S) - live
1998 At Last (Last Call)
1998 Live (Loudsprecher/Indigo) - live
1999 Live at the Olympia, Paris (Last Call) - live with one studio new song
2004 Live (Fremeaux & Associés) - live with two studio new songs

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