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Lady Bird Johnson

Lady Bird Johnson Book
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Lady Bird Johnson RememberClaudia Alta "Lady Bird" Taylor Johnson (December 22, 1912 – July 11, 2007) was First Lady of the United States from 1963 to 1969, having been the wife of U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson. Throughout her life, she was an advocate for beautification of the nation's cities and highways and conservation of natural resources. The former First Lady was an entrepreneur, creating the $150 million LBJ Holdings Company, and was a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the Congressional Gold Medal, the highest civilian honors.

Cause of death:
natural causes, Lady Bird Johnson was 94 years of at time of her death

 

 

Lady Bird Johnson Tribute

Joseph Barbera - Cartonist at Hanna-Barbera dies 95

Joe BarberaJoseph Roland "Joe" Barbera (March 24, 1911 – December 18, 2006) was an animator, cartoon artist, storyboard artist, television director, television producer, and co-founder, together with William Hanna, of Hanna-Barbera. The studio produced popular cartoons such as The Huckleberry Hound Show, The Flintstones, The Jetsons, Scooby-Doo, Top Cat and Yogi Bear, as well as the musical film, Charlotte's Web.

Death of Joseph Barbera
Joe Barbera died at the age of 95 of natural causes at his home in Studio City, Los Angeles on December 18, 2006, ending a seventy-year career in animation. His wife Sheila was at his side when he died.

  • Joe Barbera's biography continues on next page
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Early years
Joseph Barbera (pronounced bar-BEAR-uh) was born in the Little Italy section of Manhattan, New York, to immigrants of Lebanese descent.

Career

Early career
Barbera started his career as a tailor's delivery boy. During the Great Depression, he tried unsuccessfully to become a magazine cartoonist for a magazine called The NY Hits Magazine. Additionally, he once told of a letter that he wrote to Walt Disney asking for advice about getting started in the animation industry. Barbera said that Disney wrote back and replied that "its a tough business" and that he (Barbera) should seek another line of work. Undeterred by Disney's comments, Joe Barbera pressed forward.

In 1932, he joined the Van Beuren Studio as an animator and scriptwriter. He worked on cartoons such as Cubby Bear, and Rainbow Parades and also co-produced Tom and Jerry (a couple of boys, unrelated to his later cat-and-mouse series). When Van Beuren closed down in 1936, Barbera moved over to the MGM studios.

Teaming with William Hanna
Lured by a substantial salary increase, Barbera left Terrytoons and New York for the new MGM cartoon unit in California in 1937. The following year, he teamed up with William Hanna to direct theatrical short cartoons; Barbera was the storyboard/layout artist, and Hanna was in charge of the timing. Their first venture was Puss Gets the Boot (1940), the first Tom and Jerry film, which was nominated for an Academy Award for Best (Cartoon) Short Subject.

Hanna and Barbera's 17-year partnership on the Tom & Jerry series resulted in 7 Academy Awards for Best (Cartoon) Short Subject, and 14 total nominations, more than any other character-based theatrical animated series. Hanna and Barbera were placed in charge of MGM's animation division in late 1955; however, this proved short-lived as MGM closed the division in 1957. They subsequently teamed up to produce the series The Ruff & Reddy Show, under the name H-B Enterprises, soon changed to Hanna-Barbera Productions. By using the limited animation techniques, Hanna and Barbera could provide programming for networks at reduced cost.

By the late 1960s, Hanna-Barbera Productions had become the most successful television animation studio, producing hit television programs such as The Flintstones, The Jetsons, Jonny Quest, and Scooby-Doo, Where Are You!.

Later career
Hanna-Barbera had been a subsidiary of Taft Broadcasting (later Great American Communications) since 1967. The studio thrived until 1991, when it was sold to Turner Broadcasting. Hanna and Barbera stayed on as advisors and periodically worked on new Hanna-Barbera shows, including the What-a-Cartoon! series.

He served as creative consultant for the 1993 motion picture, Tom and Jerry: The Movie for Miramax Films and Film Roman. Hanna-Barbera, received eight Emmys, including the Governors Award of the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences in 1988.

Their strengths melded perfectly, critic Leonard Maltin wrote in his book Of Mice and Magic: A History of American Animated Cartoons. Barbera brought the comic gags and skilled drawing, while Hanna brought warmth and a keen sense of timing. Maltin wrote:

"This writing-directing team may hold a record for producing consistently superior cartoons using the same characters year after year - without a break or change in routine."
Hanna, who died in 2001, once said he was never a good artist but his partner could "capture mood and expression in a quick sketch better than anyone I've ever known."

After Hanna's death, Barbera remained active as an executive producer for Warner Bros. Animation on direct-to-video cartoon features as well as television series such as What's New, Scooby-Doo? and Tom and Jerry Tales. In the Tom and Jerry cartoon "The Mansion Cat" from 2000, Barbera was the houseowner's voice actor. He also wrote, co-storyboarded, co-directed and co-produced the theatrical Tom and Jerry short The KarateGuard in 2005, thus returning to his and Hanna's first successful cartoon format. His final animated project was the direct-to-video feature Tom and Jerry: A Nutcracker Tale, which came out on DVD in the U.S. on October 2, 2007.

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Jack Palance - Academy Award winning actor dies 87, 2006

Hollywood Walk of FamerOscar Award winnerGolden Glove award winner

Jack PalanceJack Palance (born Volodymyr Palahniuk; February 18, 1919 – November 10, 2006) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. With his rugged facial features, Palance was best known to modern movie audiences as both the characters of Curly and Duke in the two City Slickers movies, but his career spanned half a century of film and television appearances.

Death of Jack Palance
Jack Palance died at the age of 87, of natural causes, at his home in Montecito in Santa Barbara County.He was cremated and his ashes were retained by family and friends

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  • Jack Palance's filmography continues on next page

Jack Palance as a bad guy

Hollywood Walk of Fame
Palance has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6608 Hollywood Boulevard. In 1992, he was inducted into the Western Performers Hall of Fame at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Academy award and nominations
1952 – Nominated – Best Actor in a Supporting Role – Sudden Fear
1953 – Nominated – Best Actor in a Supporting Role – Shane
1992 – Won – Best Actor in a Supporting Role – City Slickers

Complete Filmography of Jack Palace

(1950-2004) (In order of production)

YearMovie title
1950Panic In The Streets
Halls of Montezuma
1952Shane
Sudden Fear
1953Second Chance
Flight To Tangier
Arrowhead
The Man In The Attic
1954Sign Of The Pagan
The Silver Chalice
1955Kiss of Fire
The Big Knife
I Died A Thousand Times
1956Attack
1957The Lonely Man
House Of Numbers
Flowers Of Mayo
1958The Man Inside
Ten Seconds To Hell
1959The Battle Of Austerlitz
1960Treno Di Natale
The Barbarian
1961The Mongols
The Last Judgement
Barabbas
1962Sword Of The Conqueror
Warriors Five
1963Contempt
Night Train To Milan
1965Once A Thief
The Spy In The Green Hat
1966The Professionals
1967To Kill A Dragon
Torture Garden
1968They Came To Rob Las Vegas
The Mercenary
The Battle Giants
Marquis De Sade: Justine
1969The Desperados
The Legion Of The Damned
Che
The McMasters
1970Monte Walsh
The Companeros
The Horsemen
1971Chato's Land
It Can Be Done, Amigo
1972Tedeum
The Short & Happy Life Of The Brothers Blue
1973Oklahoma Crude
1974Craze
1975The Four Deuces
The Great Adventure
Africa Express
1976Eva Nera
The Cop In Blue Jeans
Knell-The Bloody Avenger
Safari Express
Rulers Of The City
The Sensuous Nurse
God's Gun
1977Welcome To Blood City
Portrait Of A Hitman
1978One Man Jury
Angels Brigade
1979Cocaine Cowboys
The Shape Of Things To Come
1980Without Warning
Hawk The Slayer
1982Alone In The Dark
1987Gor
Bagdad Cafe
Outlaw Of Gor
1988Young Guns
1989Batman
Tango & Cash
1990Solar Crisis
City Slickers
1991Radio Flyer (Voice)
1992Eli's Lesson
1993Cyborg 2 - The Glass Shadow
City Slickers II: The Legend of Curly's Gold
1994Cops & Robbersons
The Swan Princess (Voice)
1998The Incredible Adventures Of Marco Polo
Treasure Island
2001Prancer Returns

Television Movies/Mini-Series

YearTelevision title
1968The Strange Case Of Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde
1973Dracula
1974The Godchild
The Hatfields & The McCoys
1975Bronk
1979The Last Ride Of The Dalton Gang
The Ivory Ape
1980The Golden Moment: An Olympic Love Story
1992Keep The Change
1993The Twilight Zone: Rod Serling's Lost Classics
1995Buffalo Girls
1997I'll Be Home For Christmas
Ebenezer
1999Sarah, Plain & Tall : Winters End
2001Living With The Dead
2004Back When We Were Grownups

Television Shows

YearTelevision title
1950Lights Out - The Man Who Couldn't Remember
1952Studio 1 - The King In Yellow
Curtain Call - Azaya
Studio 1 - Little Man, Big World
The Gulf Playhouse - The Necktie Party
1953Danger - Said The Spider To The Fly
The Web - Last Chance
Suspense - The Kiss Off
The Motorola Tv Hour - Brandenburg Gate
Suspense - Cagliostro & The Chess Player
1956Playhouse 90 - Requiem For A Heavyweight
Zane Grey Theatre - The Lariat
1957Playhouse 90 - The Last Tycoon
Playhouse 90 - The Death Of Manolete
1963The Greatest Show On Earth
1965Convoy - The Many Colours Of Courage
1966Run For Your Life - The Late Diana Hayes
Alice Through The Looking Glass - (Live Theatre)
1971Net Playhouse - Trail Of Tears
1973The Sonny & Cher Comedy Hour
1979Buck Rogers In The 25th Century - The Planet Of The Slave Girls
Unknown Powers (Presenter/Narrator)
1981Tales Of The Haunted - Evil Stalks This House
1982Ripley's Believe It Or Not (Series)
2001Night Visions - Bitter Harvest

Jane Wyatt - Three times emmy winner, Father Knows Best

Hollywood Walk of FameEmmy award winnerEmmy award winnerEmmy award winner 

Jane WyattJane Waddington Wyatt (August 12, 1910 – October 20, 2006) was a three-time Emmy-winning American actress perhaps best known for her role as the housewife and mother on the television series Father Knows Best and as Amanda Grayson, the human mother of Spock on the science fiction television show, "Star Trek".

Death of Jane Wyatt
Jane Wyatt died on October 20, 2006 of natural causes at her home in Bel-Air, California. She was 96 years old.

Though one of her early suitors was John D. Rockefeller III, Wyatt was married to investment broker Edgar Bethune Wardon from November 9, 1935 until his death on November 8, 2000, just one day short of the couple's 65th wedding anniversary. The couple met in the late 1920s when both were weekend houseguests of Franklin D. Roosevelt at Hyde Park. Wyatt was survived by two sons, and according to an obituary in The Washington Post, a third son died in infancy in the early 1940s.

Actor Darren McGavin dies 83

1990 Outstanding Guest Star Comedy Series 

Darren McGavin (born William Lyle Richardson; May 7, 1922 - February 25, 2006) was an American actor best known for playing the title role in the television horror series Kolchak: The Night Stalker, and also his portrayal in the movie A Christmas Story of the grumpy father given to bursts of profanity that he never realizes his son overhears. He also appeared as the tough-talking, funny detective in the TV series Mickey Spillane's Mike Hammer.

Death of Darren McGavin
Darren McGavin died of natural causes in a Los Angeles-area hospital.
Darren McGavin was 83 year old at the time of his death.

He was buried in Hollywood Forever Cemetery in Los Angeles.

Oh Fudge! - from the movie "A Christmas Story"
Darren McGavin is the father

Darren McGavin Filmography continues on next page

Darren McGavin Filmography

1940-1970
A Song to Remember (1945)
Counter-Attack (1945)
Kiss and Tell (1945)
She Wouldn't Say Yes (1946)
Fear (1946)
Queen for a Day (1951)
Summertime (1955)
The Man with the Golden Arm (1955)
The Court Martial of Billy Mitchell (1955)
A Word to the Wives (1955)
The Delicate Delinquent (1957)
Beau James (1957)
The Case Against Brooklyn (1958)
Bullet for a Badman (1964)
The Great Sioux Massacre (1965)
Gunsmoke" Joe Bascome (1966)
African Gold (1966)
Mission Mars (1968)
Anatomy of a Crime (1969)
The Challenge (1970)

1971-1990
Mooch Goes to Hollywood (1971)
Mrs. Pollifax - Spy (1971)
Happy Mother's Day, Love George (1973) (also director and producer)
43: The Richard Petty Story (1974)
B Must Die (1975)
The Demon and the Mummy (1976)
No Deposit, No Return (1976)
Airport '77 (1977)
Hot Lead and Cold Feet (1978)
Zero to Sixty (1978)
Hangar 18 (1980)
Firebird 2015 AD (1981)
A Christmas Story (1983)
The Natural (1984)
Turk 182 (1985)
Flag (1986)
Raw Deal (1986)
From the Hip (1987)
Dead Heat (1988)
In the Name of Blood (1990)

1991-1999
Captain America (1991)
Blood and Concrete (1991)
Perfect Harmony (1991)
Happy Hell Night (1992)
Billy Madison (1995)
Still Waters Burn (1996)
Small Time (1996)
Pros and Cons (1999)

Television work
Crime Photographer (1951 – 1952)
Alfred Hitchcock Presents (1955. Episode 13 : The Cheney Vase)
Mickey Spillane's Mike Hammer (1956 – 1959)
Riverboat (1959 – 1961)
The Legend of Jud Starr (1967)
Custer, ABC series with Wayne Maunder (1967)
Mission: Impossible (1967)
The Outsider (1967) (pilot episode)
The Outsider (1968 – 1969)
The Forty-Eight Hour Mile (1970)
The Challenge (1970)
The Challengers (1970)
Berlin Affair (1970)
Tribes (1970)
Banyon (1971) (pilot episode)
The Death of Me Yet (1971)
The Night Stalker (1972)
Something Evil (1972)
The Rookies (1972) (pilot episode)
Here Comes the Judge (1972)
Say Goodbye, Maggie Cole (1972)
The Night Strangler (1973)
The Six Million Dollar Man (1973) (pilot episode)
Kolchak: The Night Stalker (1974 – 1975)
Crackle of Death (1976)
Brinks: The Great Robbery (1976)
Ike: The War Years (1978)
The Users (1978)
A Bond of Iron (1979)
Donovan's Kid (1979)
Ike (1979) (miniseries)
Not Until Today (1979)
Love for Rent (1979)
Waikiki (1980)
The Martian Chronicles (1980) (miniseries)
Magnum, P.I. (1981)
Freedom to Speak (1982) (miniseries)
Small & Frye (1983) (canceled after six episodes)
The Baron and the Kid (1984)
The Return of Marcus Welby, M.D. (1984)
My Wicked, Wicked Ways: The Legend of Errol Flynn (1985)
The O'Briens (1985) (sitcom pilot)
Tales from the Hollywood Hills: Natica Jackson (1987)
Tales from the Hollywood Hills: A Table at Ciro's (1987)
Inherit the Wind (1988)
The Diamond Trap (1988)
Murphy Brown (1989)
Around the World in 80 Days (1989) (miniseries)
Kojak: It's Always Something (1990)
Child in the Night (1990)
By Dawn's Early Light (1990)
Clara (1991)
Perfect Harmony (1991)
Miracles and Other Wonders (1992–199?)
Mastergate (1992)
The American Clock (1993)
A Perfect Stranger (1994)
Fudge-A-Mania (1995)
Derby (1995)
Touched by an Angel ([1997, guest appearance)
X-Files ([1999, two episodes)

Jean Shepherd - narrator of "A Christmas Story", Writer, Actor

Voice of A Christmas StoryJean Parker Shepherd (July 26, 1921 - October 16, 1999) was an American raconteur, radio and TV personality, writer and actor who was often referred to by the nickname Shep.

With a career that spanned decades, Shepherd is best-known to modern audiences for narrating the film A Christmas Story (1983), which he co-wrote, based on his own semi-autobiographical stories.

Death of Jean Shepherd
Jean Shepherd died on Sanibel Island in 1999 of "natural causes." at Lee Memorial Hospital near his home on Sanibel Island, Fla. Jean Shepherd was 78 years old at the time of his death.

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* Jean Shepherd's filmography, biography continues next page

Jean Shepherd - "Ollie Hopnoodle's Haven of Bliss"

Early life
Born on the south side of Chicago, Illinois, Shepherd was raised in Hammond, Indiana, where he graduated from Hammond High School in 1939. As a youth he worked briefly as a mail carrier in a steel mill and earned his Amateur radio license when he was 16. He later attended several universities.

During World War II, he served in the U.S. Army Signal Corps. Shepherd then had an extensive career in a variety of media:

Filmography
America, Inc. NET Playhouse (1970) (TV)
Jean Shepherd's America (1971) (TV)
The Phantom of the Open Hearth (1976) (TV)
The Great American Fourth of July and Other Disasters (1982) (TV)
The Star-Crossed Romance of Josephine Cosnowski (1983) (TV)
A Christmas Story (1983)
The Great American Road-Racing Festival (1985) (TV)
Ollie Hopnoodle's Haven of Bliss (1988) (TV)
My Summer Story (aka It Runs in the Family) (1994)

Radio career
Shepherd began his broadcast radio career on WSAI-AM in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1948. From 1951 to 1953 he had a late-night broadcast on KYW-AM in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, after which he returned to Cincinnati for a show on WLW. After a stint on television (see below), he returned to radio. "Shep," as he was known, settled in at WOR radio New York City, New York on an overnight slot in 1956, where he delighted his fans by telling stories, reading poetry (especially the works of Robert W. Service), and organizing comedic listener stunts. The most famous of the last involved creating a hoax about a non-existent book, I, Libertine, by the equally non-existent author "Frederick R. Ewing", in 1956. Later co-written by Shepherd, Theodore Sturgeon and Betty Ballantine, this Ballantine Book is now a collector's item. Among his close friends in the late 1950s were Shel Silverstein and Herb Gardner. With them and actress Lois Nettleton, Shepherd performed in the revue he created, Look, Charlie. Later he was married to Nettleton for about six years.

Print
Shepherd wrote a series of humorous short stories about growing up in northwest Indiana and its steel towns, many of which were first told by him on his programs and then published in "Playboy." The stories were later assembled into books titled "In God We Trust, All Others Pay Cash," "Wanda Hickey's Night of Golden Memories," and "A Fistful of Fig Newtons." Some of those situations were incorporated into his movies and television fictional stories. He also wrote a column for the early "Village Voice," a column for "Car and Driver" and numerous individual articles for diverse publications, including "Mad Magazine."

Television and films
Early in his career, Shepherd had a television program in Cincinnati called "Rear Bumper." Reportedly he was eventually recommended to replace the resigning Steve Allen on NBC's "The Tonight Show." NBC executives sent Shepherd to New York City to prepare for the position, but they were contractually bound to first offer it to Jack Paar. The network was certain Paar would hold out for a role in prime time, but he accepted the late-night assignment. However, he did not assume the position permanently until Shepherd and Ernest Kovacs had co-hosted the show.

In the early 1960s he did a weekly television show on WOR in New York. Between 1971 and 1994, Shepherd became a screenwriter of note, writing and producing numerous works for both television and cinema. He was the writer and narrator for the show "Jean Shepherd's America," produced by Boston Public Television station WGBH in which he told his famous narratives, visited unusual locales, and interviewed local people of interest. He used a similar format for the New Jersey Network TV show "Shepherd's Pie." On many of the Public TV shows he wrote, directed and edited entire shows.

He also wrote and narrated many works, the most famous being the feature film "A Christmas Story," which is now considered a holiday classic. In the film, Shepherd provides the voice of the adult Ralph Parker. (This narrative style was later appropriated, without acknowledgment, in the popular television sitcom "The Wonder Years.") He also has a cameo role playing a man overseeing the line at the department store waiting for Santa Claus. Much to Ralphie's chagrin, he points out to him that the end of the line is much further away.

A 1994 movie sequel, "My Summer Story," was narrated by Shepherd but featured an almost entirely different cast from the previous film. The PBS series "American Playhouse" aired a series of television movies based on Shepherd stories, also featuring the Parker family. These included "Ollie Hopnoodle's Haven of Bliss," "The Great American Fourth of July and Other Disasters," and "The Phantom of the Open Hearth."

Live performances and recordings
Shepherd also performed for several years at The Limelight Cafe in New York City's Greenwich Village, and at many colleges nationwide. His live shows were a perennial favorite at Rutgers and Fairleigh Dickinson Universities. He performed at Princeton University annually for 30 years, until 1996. The Limelight shows were broadcast live on WOR radio.

He also performed before sold-out audiences at Carnegie Hall and Town Hall. He was also emcee for several important jazz concerts in the late 1950s. Shepherd improvised spoken word lyrics for the title track on jazz great Charles Mingus's 1957 album The Clown. Eight record albums of live and studio performances of Shepherd were released between 1955 and 1975. Shepherd also recorded the opening narration and the voice of the Audio-Animatronics "Father" character for the updated Carousel of Progress attraction at Walt Disney World Magic Kingdom.


Music
Many of his broadcasts were accompanied by novelty songs such as "The Bear Missed the Train" (a parody of the Yiddish ballad "Bei Mir Bist Du Schoen") and "The Sheik of Araby", or by Shepherd himself, playing the Jew's harp, nose flute and kazoo.

On radio as well as on his WOR-TV show, he frequently used his own head as a musical instrument, knocking the top of his skull with his knuckles while changing the size of his open mouth to produce different notes. Shep facetiously claimed that his "Head Thumping" (as he called it) spanned about an octave.


Ham Radio
Jean held the Ham Radio call K2ORS. He was very active on ham radio until his death. Jean is also credited as the voice for the ARRL's tape series 'Tune in the world with Ham Radio'. This series of tapes helped many young people become ham radio operators.

Lloyd Bridges, movie giant dies 85 - natural causes

7065 Hollywood Boulevard 

Lloyd Vernet Bridges, Jr. (January 15, 1913 - March 10, 1998) was an Emmy Award-nominated American actor. Bridges starred in popular television series, and appeared in more than 150 films.

Death of Lloyd Bridges
Lloyd Bridges died of natura causes.
Lloyd Bridges was 85 years old at the time of his death.

Lloyd Bridges appeared in more than 150 films. He started as a contract performer for Columbia Pictures, appearing in classics such as High Noon, Little Big Horn, and Sahara. By the end of his career, he was a staple of parody films such as Airplane!, Hot Shots!, and Jane Austen's Mafia!. He acted in the role of "The President" in the movie Hot Shots: Part 2.

Bridges made his Broadway debut in 1939 in a production of Shakespeare's Othello. He made a few film appearances before enlisting in the U.S. Coast Guard. Following World War II, he returned to film acting. He was blacklisted briefly in the 1950s after he admitted to the House Un-American Activities Committee that he had once been a member of the Actors' Lab, a group with links to the Communist Party. He resumed working after being cleared by the FBI, finding his greatest success in television.

Seinfeld.  Izzy Mandelbaum - played by Lloyd Bridges

Lloyd Bridges' Filmography continues next page

Filmography

Features
Freshman Love (1936)
Dancing Feet (1936)
The Lone Wolf Takes a Chance (1941)
They Dare Not Love (1941)
The Medico of Painted Springs (1941)
The Son of Davy Crockett (1941)
Here Comes Mr. Jordan (1941)
Our Wife (1941)
Harmon of Michigan (1941)
Two Latins from Manhattan (1941)
You Belong to Me (1941)
Three Girls About Town (1941)
The Royal Mounted Patrol (1941)
Sing for Your Supper (1941)
Honolulu Lu (1941)
Harvard, Here I Come! (1941)
West of Tombstone (1942)
Blondie Goes to College (1942)
Cadets on Parade (1942)
Shut My Big Mouth (1942)
Canal Zone (1942)
Tramp, Tramp, Tramp (1942)
North of the Rockies (1942)
Alias Boston Blackie (1942)
The Wife Takes a Flyer (1942)
Sweetheart of the Fleet (1942)
Riders of the Northland (1942)
Flight Lieutenant (1942)
Atlantic Convoy (1942)
The Talk of the Town (1942)
A Man's World (1942)
The Spirit of Stanford (1942)
The Daring Young Man (1942)
Boston Blackie Goes Hollywood (1942)
Pardon My Gun (1942)
Underground Agent (1942)
Counter-Espionage (1942) (uncredited) (waiter)
Commandos Strike at Dawn (1943)
City Without Men (1943)
One Dangerous Night (1943)
Destroyer (1943)
Passport to Suez (1943)
Hail to the Rangers (1943)
Sahara (1943)
The Heat's On (1943)
There's Something About a Soldier (1943)
Crime Doctor's Strangest Case (1943)
Once Upon a Time (1944)
She's a Soldier Too (1944)
Louisiana Hayride (1944)
The Master Race (1944)
Saddle Leather Law (1944)
Secret Agent X-9 (1945)
Strange Confession (1945)
A Walk in the Sun (1945)
Abilene Town (1946)
Miss Susie Sagle's (1946)
Canyon Passage (1946)
Ramrod (1947)
 The Trouble with Women (1947)
Thunderbolt (1947)
Unconquered (1947)
Secret Service Investigator (1948)
16 Fathoms Deep (1948)
Moonrise (1948)
Hideout (1949)
Red Canyon (1949)
Home of the Brave (1949)
Calamity Jane and Sam Bass (1949)
Trapped (1949)
Colt .45 (1950)
Rocketship X-M (1950)
The White Tower (1950)
The Sound of Fury (1950)
Little Big Horn (1951)
Three Steps North (1951)
High Noon (1952)
Plymouth Adventure (1952)
Last of the Comanches (1953)
The Tall Texan (1953)
The Kid from Left Field (1953)
City of Bad Men (1953)
The Limping Man (1953)
Pride of the Blue Grass (1954)
The Deadly Game (1954)
Wichita (1955)
Apache Woman (1955)
Wetbacks (1956)
The Rainmaker (1956)
Ride Out for Revenge (1957)
The Goddess (1958)
A Pair of Boots (1962)
Around the World Under the Sea (1966)
Daring Game (1968)
Attack on the Iron Coast (1968)
The Happy Ending (1969)
Scuba (1972) (documentary) (narrator)
To Find a Man (1972)
Running Wild (1973)
The Fifth Musketeer (1979)
Bear Island (1979)
Airplane! (1980)
Airplane II: The Sequel (1982)
The Thanksgiving Promise (1986)
Weekend Warriors (1987)
The Wild Pair (1987) with son Beau Bridges
Tucker: The Man and His Dream (1988)
Winter People (1989)
Cousins (1989)
Joe Versus the Volcano (1990)
Hot Shots! (1991)
Honey, I Blew Up the Kid (1992)
Earth and the American Dream (1992) (documentary) (narrator)
Mr. Bluesman (1993)
Hot Shots! Part Deux (1993)
Blown Away (1994)
Jane Austen's Mafia! (1998)
Meeting Daddy (2000)
From Russia to Hollywood: The 100-Year Odyssey of Chekhov and Shdanoff (2002)
 


Short subjects
The Great Glover (1942)
They Stooge to Conga (1943)
A Rookie's Cookie (1943)
His Wedding Scare (1943)
Mr. Whitney Had a Notion (1949)
My Daddy Can Lick Your Daddy (1962)
The World of Inner Space (1966)
I Am Joe's Heart (1987) (voice)

Television work
Sea Hunt (1957-1961)
The Lloyd Bridges Show (1962-1963)
The Eleventh Hour with son Beau, "Cannibal Plants, They Eat You Alive" as Leonard McCarty (1964)
The Loner (1965-1966)
Mission: Impossible (1966) (Fakeout:Anastas Poltroni)
A Case of Libel (1968)
Lost Flight (1969)
Silent Night, Lonely Night (1969)
The Silent Gun (1969)
The Love War (1970)
San Francisco International Airport (1970-1971)
Do You Take This Stranger? (1971)
A Tattered Web (1971)
Deadly Dream (1971)
Water World (1972-1975) (narrator)
Haunts of the Very Rich (1972)
Trouble Comes to Town (1973)
Crime Club (1973)
Death Race (1973)
Benjamin Franklin (1974) (miniseries)
The Whirlwind (1974)
Stowaway to the Moon (1975)
Cop on the Beat (1975)
Joe Forrester (1975-1976)
Force of Evil (1977)
Roots (1977) (miniseries)
Telethon (1977)
Shimmering Light (1978)
Battlestar Galactica (1978 TV series) (Commander Cain)
Alice in Wonderland (1985 miniseries) (White Knight)
Shining Time Station: 'Tis a Gift (PBS TV Special) (Mr. Nicholas)
Leona Helmsley: The Queen of Mean (1990) (Harry Helmsley)
In The Nick Of Time (1991 Christmas Movie) (Santa Claus)
The Outer Limits – "The Sandkings" (March 26, 1995)
Dress Gray (1986) (miniseries)
Seinfeld (1997) (Izzy Mandelbaum)

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