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Heart_Failure

Joe Weider, bodybuilding & fitness icon, dies 93

joe

joeJosef Edwin "Joe" Weider (November 29, 1920 – March 23, 2013) was the co-founder of the International Federation of BodyBuilders (IFBB) along with brother Ben Weider and creator of the Mr. Olympia, the Ms. Olympia and the Masters Olympia bodybuilding contests. He was the publisher of several bodybuilding and fitness-related magazines, most notably Muscle & Fitness, Flex, Men's Fitness and Shape, and the manufacturer of a line of fitness equipment and fitness supplements. In 1995, he appeared in the Charlton Heston and Peter Graves film, America: A Call to Greatness, directed by Warren Chaney.

Joe Weider created Weider Nutrition in 1940, considered the first sports nutrition company. Now called Schiff Nutrition International, they were the creators of Tiger's Milk nutrition bars and related products, one of the earliest lines of sports foods.

On Labor Day 2006, California governor and seven times Mr. Olympia winner Arnold Schwarzenegger, a Weider protégé, presented him with the Venice Muscle Beach Hall of Fame's Lifetime Achievement award. Schwarzenegger credited Weider with inspiring him to enter bodybuilding and to come to the United States.

Joe Weider cause of death

Joe Weider died of heart failure on March 23, 2013 at his home in Los Angeles, California.  Joe Weider was 92 years old at the time of his death. He is survived by his wife Betty.

John Kerr, actor, 'Tea and Sympathy,' 'South Pacific,' Dies 81

John Grinham Kerr (November 15, 1931 – February 2, 2013), was an American actor from a family rooted in British and Broadway stage, and a lawyer.

He made his Broadway debut in 1953 in Mary Coyle Chase's Bernardine, a high-school comedy for which he won a Theatre World Award. In 1953-54, he received considerable critical acclaim as a troubled prep school student in Robert Anderson's play Tea and Sympathy. In 1954, he won a Tony Award for his performance, and he starred in the film version in 1956.

John Kerr had a major role in the film version of Rodgers and Hammerstein's South Pacific (1958), playing Lt. Joe Cable, the newly arrived marine about to be sent on a dangerous spy mission. In The Crowded Sky (1960), Kerr played a pilot who helps the Captain (Dana Andrews) steer a crippled airliner back to earth. His only other notable film appearance was in Roger Corman's The Pit and the Pendulum (1961), co-starring with Vincent Price and Barbara Steele

In 1963, Kerr had a continuing role on "Arrest and Trial" playing Assistant DA Barry Pine. In 1965, Kerr guest starred on NBC's The Alfred Hitchcock Hour. He had a regular role on the ABC-TV primetime TV series, Peyton Place, playing District Attorney John Fowler during the 1965-66 season. In 1964-65 he appeared as guest star on several episodes of Twelve O'Clock High. During the 1970s, Kerr had a recurring role as prosecutor Gerald O'Brien on the Quinn Martin television series The Streets of San Francisco. His last appearance as an actor was in 1986, in a minor role in The Park Is Mine, a made-for-TV movie starring Tommy Lee Jones.

He graduated law school, and passed the California bar in 1970. He since pursued a full-time career as a Beverly Hills lawyer, but still accepted occasional small roles in a variety of television productions over the years. He retired from legal practice in 2000.

John Kerr Cause of Death

John Kerr died of congestive heart failure.  John Kerr was 81 years old at the time of his death.

South Pacific - Younger Than Springtime

Dave Brubeck, jazz legend, dies 91

Hollywood Walk of Fame

David Warren "Dave" Brubeck (December 6, 1920 – December 5, 2012) was an American jazz pianist and composer considered to be one of the foremost exponents of progressive jazz. He wrote a number of jazz standards, including "In Your Own Sweet Way" and "The Duke". Brubeck's style ranged from refined to bombastic, reflecting his mother's attempts at classical training and his improvisational skills. His music is known for employing unusual time signatures, and superimposing contrasting rhythms, meters, and tonalities.

His long-time musical partner, alto saxophonist Paul Desmond, wrote the saxophone melody for the Dave Brubeck Quartet's best remembered piece, "Take Five"

Dave Brubeck cause of death

Brubeck died of heart failure on December 5, 2012, in Norwalk, Connecticut, one day before his 92nd birthday.

Inducted to the Walk of Fame on February 8, 1960

Dave Brubeck - Take The 'A' Train - 1966

Major Harris, R&B singer, The Delfonics, dies 65

Major Harris III (February 9, 1947 – November 9, 2012) was an American R&B singer, associated with the Philadelphia soul sound and The Delfonics (early 1970s-1974).

In the early 1970s, he took over from Randy Cain as a member of The Delfonics; he quit the group to go solo in 1974. Signing with Atlantic Records, Harris scored a string of R&B hits in the United States, including the Top Ten single "Love Won't Let Me Wait", which peaked at #5 in the US Billboard Hot 100 chart and #37 in the UK Top 50. Written by Bobby Eli and Vinnie Barrett, "Love Won't Let Me Wait" was awarded a gold disc by the R.I.A.A. on 25 June 1975.

When his success as a soloist subsided, Harris returned to the Delfonics, and continued to tour with one of two touring ensembles that used the name in the 1990s and 2000s. Major was a cousin to the late Philadelphia record producer and arranger, Norman Harris.

Harris died in a Richmond, Virginia hospital from congestive heart and lung failure at the age of 65

Major Harris - Love won't let me wait

Sahara Davenport, "RuPaul's Drag Race" star, dies 27

Sahara Davenport, born Antoine Ashley, (December 17, 1984 – October 1, 2012) was an American drag queen and reality television personality and classically-trained dancer. He was best known as a contestant on the second season of RuPaul's Drag Race.

Sahara Davenport cause of death
Davenport died of heart failure.
Sahara Davenport was 27 years old at the time of his death.

Davenport died on October 1, 2012. The cause of his death is yet to be determined.

Joe South, Nashville Songwriters Hall of Famer, dies 72

Grammy WinnerGrammy Winner

Joe South (born Joseph Alfred Souter, February 28, 1940 - September 5, 2012) was a multi-talented American singer-songwriter and guitarist.

South was a prominent sideman, playing guitar on Aretha Franklin's "Chain of Fools", Tommy Roe's "Sheila", and Bob Dylan's Blonde on Blonde album.

His biggest single was "Games People Play"  The production won the Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Song and the Grammy Award for Song of the Year.

South's compositions have been recorded by many other artists as well, including Billy Joe Royal's songs "Down in the Boondocks", "I Knew You When", "Yo-Yo" (later a hit for the Osmonds), and "Hush" (later a hit for Deep Purple and Kula Shaker). South's most commercially successful composition is Lynn Anderson's 1971 country/pop monster hit "(I Never Promised You A) Rose Garden", which was a hit in 16 countries worldwide and translated into many languages. Anderson won a Grammy Award for her vocals, and South won a Grammy Award for writing the song. South would go on to write more hits for Anderson, such as "How Can I Unlove You" (Billboard Country No. 1) and "Fool Me" (Billboard Country No. 3).

South was inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1979.

Joe South Cause of Death
Joe South died of heart failure.
Joe South was 72 years old at the time of his death

Joe South - Games People Play

John Rich, Legendary TV Director, 'All in the Family', Dies 86

John Rich (July 6, 1925 – January 29, 2012) was a film and television director. He directed such television shows as Where's Raymond?, Mister Ed, The Dick Van Dyke Show, All in the Family, The Jeffersons, Maude, Good Times, Barney Miller, Newhart, Benson, The Brady Bunch, Bonanza, The Rifleman, The Twilight Zone, Murphy Brown, and Gilligan's Island.

His feature film credits include Wives and Lovers, Boeing Boeing, Roustabout and Easy Come, Easy Go (the latter two starring Elvis Presley). He also participated in the live telecast of the opening day ceremonies of Disneyland in 1955. He won an Emmy for The Dick Van Dyke Show, two Emmys for All in the Family, and two Golden Globes for All in the Family.

In the 1980s Rich and Henry Winkler formed a production company called Henry Winkler/John Rich Productions and together they produced MacGyver for Paramount Television.

John Rich cause of death
John Rich died of heart failure.
John Rich was 86 years old at the time of his death

John Rich directed this famous episode of All in the family
Sammy Davis Jr. Kissing Archie Bunker

James Farentino, Stage and Film Actor, Dies 73

James Farentino (February 24, 1938 – January 24, 2012) was an American actor. He appeared in nearly 100 television, film and stage roles, among them The Final Countdown, Jesus of Nazareth, and Dynasty.

Farentino was charged with stalking his former girlfriend, Tina Sinatra (youngest child of Frank Sinatra), in 1993. A restraining order was issued against him after he entered a plea of nolo contendere.

James Farentino cause of death
On January 24, 2012, Farentino died of heart failure at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, California following a long illness.  James Farentino was 73 years old at the time of his death.

Dead & Buried (1981) International Trailer

Blues legend Hubert Sumlin dies 80

Hubert Sumlin (November 16, 1931 – December 4, 2011) was an American Chicago blues and electric blues guitarist and singer. He was best known for his celebrated work, from 1955, as guitarist in Howlin' Wolf's band. His singular playing was characterized by "wrenched, shattering bursts of notes, sudden cliff-hanger silences and daring rhythmic suspensions". Sumlin was listed as number 43 in the Rolling Stone 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time.

Hubert Sumlin cause of death
Hubert Sumlin died on December 4, 2011, in a hospital in Wayne, New Jersey, of heart failure
Hubert Sumlin was 80 years old at the time of his death.

Hubert Sumlin & David Johansen - Killing Floor (Hubert Sumlin on guitar)

Bil Keane, creator of 'Family Circus' comic strip, dies 89

William Aloysius Keane (October 5, 1922 – November 8, 2011), better known as Bil Keane, was an American cartoonist notable for his work on the long-running newspaper comic The Family Circus, which began its run in 1960 and continues in syndication.

Keane was the president of the National Cartoonists Society from 1981 to 1983 and was the emcee of the Society's annual awards banquet for 16 years.

Bil Keane cause of death
Bil Keane died from congestive heart failure at his home in Paradise Valley, Arizona (near Phoenix)
Bil Keane was 89 years old at the time of his death.

Family Circus Official Website

Sylvia Robinson, ‘the Mother of Hip-Hop,’ Dies 75

Sylvia Robinson (March 6, 1936 - September 29, 2011) was a singer, musician, music producer, and record label executive, most notably known for her work as founder/CEO of the seminal hip hop label Sugar Hill Records. She is credited as the driving force behind two landmark singles in the genre. The first was "Rapper's Delight" by the Sugarhill Gang, which was the first rap song to be released by a hip hop act. The second was "The Message" by Grandmaster Flash & the Furious Five.

Sylvia Robinson cause of death
Sylvia Robinson died of congestive heart failure.
Sylvia Robinson was 75 years old at the time of her death.

Pillow Talk - Sylvia Robinson

The Sugar Hill Gang - Rapper's Delight

Wade Mainer, a Pioneer of Bluegrass Banjo, Dies at 104

Wade Mainer (April 21, 1907 – September 12, 2011) was an American singer and banjoist. With his band, the Sons of the Mountaineers, he is credited with bridging the gap between old-time mountain music and Bluegrass and is sometimes called the "Grandfather of Bluegrass." In addition, he innovated a two-finger banjo fingerpicking style, which was a precursor to modern three-finger bluegrass styles.

Mainer has been credited with bridging the gap between old-time mountain music and Bluegrass and musicians such as Bill Monroe, Ralph Stanley and Doc Watson have all cited Mainer as a source of influence. He has also been called the "Grandfather of Bluegrass.

Awards and honours
In 1987, president Ronald Reagan bestowed upon him a National Heritage Fellowship for his contributions to American music.[2] In 1996 he received the Michigan Heritage Award and the Michigan Country Music Association and Services' Lifetime Achievement Award. In 1998 both he and his wife were inducted into the Michigan Country Music Hall of Fame, while Mainer received North Carolina’s Surry Arts Council Lifetime Achievement.

Wade Mainer caouse of death
Mainer died of congestive heart failure on September 12, 2011.
Wade Mainer was 104 years old at the time of his death

David Holt: Julia and Wade Mainer songs & banjo tricks

David Holt: Julia and Wade Mainer songs & banjo tricks

Wade Mainer - Worried Man Blues

David 'Honeyboy' Edwards, Chicago blues great dies 96

David "Honeyboy" Edwards (June 28, 1915 – August 29, 2011) was a Delta blues guitarist and singer from the American South.

David "Honeyboy" Edwards Cause of Death
On August 29, 2011, Honeyboy Edwards died peacefully at his home of congestive heart failure at around 3 a.m.

David "Honeyboy" Edwards - Gamblin' Man

Gil Bernal, 'Smokey Joe's Café' saxophonist, dies 80

Gil Bernal (February 4, 1931  in Watts, Los Angeles - July 17, 2011)  was an American saxophonist (Tenor).  Gil Bernal played Jazz, Rhythm and Blues.

Gil Bernal's memorable saxophon solos:
Duane Eddy's "Rebel Rouser" and the Robins' "Smokey Joe's Cafe."

He worked with artists such as Spike Jones, Lionel Hampton and Ry Cooder.

Gil Bernal cause of death
Gil Bernal died of congestive heart failure.
Gil Bernal was 80 years old at the time of his death.

The Robins - Smokey Joes Cafe
Gil Bernal was not a member of of The Robins.  He was a guest player.

Leonard Stern, writer for 'The Honeymooners' and 'Get Smart,' dies at 88

Leonard B. Stern (December 23, 1923 – June 7, 2011) born in New York City NY, was one of the creators, with Roger Price, of the word game Mad Libs.

Leonard Stern was a successful television writer who wrote for such now classic series such as Get Smart, The Honeymooners, the Phil Silvers Show, The Steve Allen Show and Steve Allen's Tonight Show. He also was a writer for the 1952 Danny Thomas and Peggy Lee version of The Jazz Singer and several Abbott and Costello films, among others. In the 1970s, he produced and directed the TV series McMillan and Wife, which starred Rock Hudson.

Leonard Stern cause of death
On June 7, 2011, Stern died of heart failure at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. Stern is survived by his wife of 55 years, actress Gloria Stroock, as well as a son, Michael Stern, a daughter, Kate Stern, two grandchildren, and a great-granddaughter. Funeral services were scheduled Friday at Mt. Sinai.

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