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95

Nelson Mandela, South African Icon of Peaceful Resistance, Dies 95

Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela (July 18, 1918 ? December 5, 2013) was a South African anti-apartheid revolutionary and politician who served as President of South Africa from 1994 to 1999. He was the first black South African to hold the office, and the first elected in a fully representative, multiracial election. His government focused on dismantling the legacy of apartheid through tackling institutionalised racism, poverty and inequality, and fostering racial reconciliation. Politically an African nationalist and democratic socialist, he served as the President of the African National Congress (ANC) from 1991 to 1997. Internationally, Mandela was the Secretary General of the Non-Aligned Movement from 1998 to 1999.

Nelson Mandela cause of death

Nelson Mandela died on December 5, 2013, after a long illness after being in vegatative state for five month.  Nelson Mandela was 95 years old at the time of his death. He died at home, surrounded by his family. His death was announced by President Jacob Zuma.

Allan Arbus, 'M*A*S*H' star, dies 95

Allan Arbus (February 15, 1918 – April 19, 2013) was an American actor notable for his role as psychiatrist Dr. Sidney Freedman on the television series M*A*S*H.

Arbus is far better known for his television work, which includes over 45 titles and works as recent as Curb Your Enthusiasm in 2000. Among Arbus's non-M*A*S*H TV work are guest and recurring roles in such television series as Law & Order, L.A. Law, Matlock, Starsky and Hutch, and Judging Amy.

During the 1940's Allan Arbus was a successful photographer, primarily known for advertising photography that appeared in Glamour, Seventeen, Vogue, Harper's Bazaar, and other magazines

Allan Arbus cause of death

Allan Arbus was 95 years old at the time of his death.  Cause of death was not released.

Allan Arbus as Sydney Freedman - M*A*S*H

Paul Tanner, Glenn Miller trombonist, dies 95

Paul Tanner (October 15, 1917 – February 5, 2013) was an American musician and former member of the Glenn Miller Orchestra.  He was the last surviving member of the Glenn Miller Orchestra

Tanner developed and played the electrotheremin. The electrotheremin is featured in several songs by The Beach Boys, with Tanner himself playing the instrument; most notably Good Vibrations, Wild Honey, and I Just Wasn't Made For These Times.

Paul Tanner Cause of Death

Paul Tanner died of pneumonia on February 5, 2013. Paul Tanner was 95 years old at the time of his death.

Too Little Time - featuring paul tanner

Han Suyin, author of ‘A Many-Splendoured Thing,’ dies 95

Han Suyin (September, 12 1917 – November 2, 2012) was the pen name of Elizabeth Comber, born Rosalie Elisabeth Kuanghu Chow. She was a Chinese-born Eurasian author of several books on modern China, novels set in East Asia, and autobiographical works, as well as a physician. She lived in Lausanne until her death and wrote in English and French.

In 1955, her best-known work, A Many-Splendoured Thing, was made into a Hollywood film, with a musical theme that became popular song and won the Academy Award for Best Original Song. In her autobiography My House Has Two Doors, she distanced herself from the film, saying that although the film was shown for many weeks at the Cathay Cinema in Singapore to packed audiences, she never went to see it, and that the film rights were sold to pay for an operation on her adopted daughter who was suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis. Much later, the movie itself was made into a daytime soap opera, which ran from 1967 to 1973 on American TV.

Han Suyin cause of death

She died in Lausanne on 2 November 2012, aged 95. She is survived by two daughters, Tang Yung Mei and Chew Hui Im.

Matt Monro - Love is a many splendored thing

Phyllis Diller, Legendary Comic, Dies 95

Hollywood Walk of Fame

Phyllis DillerPhyllis Diller (July 17, 1917 – August 20, 2012) was an American actress and comedian. She created a stage persona of a wild-haired, eccentrically dressed housewife who makes self-deprecating jokes about her age and appearance, her terrible cooking, and a husband named "Fang", while pretending to smoke from a long cigarette holder. Diller's signature was her unusual laugh.

Phyllis Diller cause of death
Phyllis Diller passed away on August 20, 2012.
Diller suffered medical problems, including a heart attack in 1999. After a hospital stay she was fitted with a pacemaker and released. A bad fall resulted in her being hospitalized for neurological tests and pacemaker installation in 2005. She subsequently retired from stand-up comedy appearances.

On July 11, 2007, USA Today reported that she fractured her back and had to cancel a Tonight Show appearance, during which she had planned to celebrate her 90th birthday. On January 4, 2011, she appeared on CNN's "Anderson Cooper 360" as part of a panel of comedians.

Phyllis Diller, Hollywood Walk of Fame
North side of the 7000 block of Hollywood Boulevard

Phyllis Diller's son, Perry, says he found his mother passed away in her bed with a smile on her face.

Phyllis Diller and her bird legs

Celeste Holm, Oscar-winning actress, 'Oklahoma!', dies 95

oscar winnerstarwalk of fame

Celeste Holm (April 29, 1917 – July 15, 2012) was an American stage, film, and television actress, known for her Academy Award-winning performance in Gentleman's Agreement (1947), as well as for her Oscar-nominated performances in Come to the Stable (1949) and All About Eve (1950) and originating the role of Ado Annie in the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical Oklahoma! (1943).

Celeste Holm cause of death
Celeste Holm died of heart attack.  Celeste Holm was 95 years old at the time of her death.

In June 2012, Holm was admitted to New York's Roosevelt Hospital with dehydration after a fire in Robert De Niro's apartment in the same Manhattan building. She suffered a heart attack on July 13 in the facility, dying at home on July 15, where she chose to spend her final days. She is survived by husband Frank Basile and her sons.

According to her husband, Holm had been treated for memory loss since 2002, suffered skin cancer, bleeding ulcers and a collapsed lung, and had hip replacements and pacemakers.

2 Hollywood Walk of Fame:
1502 Vine St,
6805 Hollywood Blvd

CELESTE HOLM TRIBUTE

Ernest Borgnine, Oscar winning actor, dies 95

oscargolden glovewalk of fame

Ernest Borgnine, born Ermes Effron Borgnino, (January 24, 1917 – July 8, 2012) was an American actor of television and film. His career spanned more than six decades. He was an unconventional lead in many films of the 1950s, including his Academy Award-winning turn in the 1955 film Marty. On television, he played Quinton McHale in the 1962–66 series McHale's Navy and co-starred in the mid-1980s action series Airwolf, in addition to a wide variety of other roles. Borgnine was also known for his role as Mermaid Man in the animated television series SpongeBob SquarePants. Borgnine earned an Emmy Award nomination at age 92 for his work on the series ER. He was also known for his love of Mexican food.

Ernest Borgnine cause of death
Borgnine died of renal failure (kidney failure) on 2012 July 8 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Centre in Los Angeles, California. His wife and children were at his side.
Ernest Borgnine was 95 years old at the time of his death

Ernest Borgnine has received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6324 Hollywood Blvd. In 1996,
Borgnine won the 1955 Academy Award for Best Actor for his portrayal of Marty Piletti in the film Marty.

celebrity

Ernest Borgnine Lifetime Achievement Award

Watergate 'Deep Throat', Mark, Felt Dies 95

deep throat Mark FeltWilliam Mark Felt, Sr. (August 17, 1913 – December 18, 2008) was a former agent of the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation, who retired in 1973 as the Bureau's Associate Director. After thirty years of denying his involvement with reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, Felt revealed himself on May 31, 2005 to be the Watergate scandal whistleblower called "Deep Throat."

Death OF William Mark Felt
At 12:45pm on December 18, 2008, Felt died of congestive heart failure in his sleep at a hospice care facility in Santa Rosa, California. He was 95 years old. His death was reported in the Washington Post by Bob Woodward.

Joseph Barbera - Cartonist at Hanna-Barbera dies 95

Joe BarberaJoseph Roland "Joe" Barbera (March 24, 1911 – December 18, 2006) was an animator, cartoon artist, storyboard artist, television director, television producer, and co-founder, together with William Hanna, of Hanna-Barbera. The studio produced popular cartoons such as The Huckleberry Hound Show, The Flintstones, The Jetsons, Scooby-Doo, Top Cat and Yogi Bear, as well as the musical film, Charlotte's Web.

Death of Joseph Barbera
Joe Barbera died at the age of 95 of natural causes at his home in Studio City, Los Angeles on December 18, 2006, ending a seventy-year career in animation. His wife Sheila was at his side when he died.

  • Joe Barbera's biography continues on next page
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Early years
Joseph Barbera (pronounced bar-BEAR-uh) was born in the Little Italy section of Manhattan, New York, to immigrants of Lebanese descent.

Career

Early career
Barbera started his career as a tailor's delivery boy. During the Great Depression, he tried unsuccessfully to become a magazine cartoonist for a magazine called The NY Hits Magazine. Additionally, he once told of a letter that he wrote to Walt Disney asking for advice about getting started in the animation industry. Barbera said that Disney wrote back and replied that "its a tough business" and that he (Barbera) should seek another line of work. Undeterred by Disney's comments, Joe Barbera pressed forward.

In 1932, he joined the Van Beuren Studio as an animator and scriptwriter. He worked on cartoons such as Cubby Bear, and Rainbow Parades and also co-produced Tom and Jerry (a couple of boys, unrelated to his later cat-and-mouse series). When Van Beuren closed down in 1936, Barbera moved over to the MGM studios.

Teaming with William Hanna
Lured by a substantial salary increase, Barbera left Terrytoons and New York for the new MGM cartoon unit in California in 1937. The following year, he teamed up with William Hanna to direct theatrical short cartoons; Barbera was the storyboard/layout artist, and Hanna was in charge of the timing. Their first venture was Puss Gets the Boot (1940), the first Tom and Jerry film, which was nominated for an Academy Award for Best (Cartoon) Short Subject.

Hanna and Barbera's 17-year partnership on the Tom & Jerry series resulted in 7 Academy Awards for Best (Cartoon) Short Subject, and 14 total nominations, more than any other character-based theatrical animated series. Hanna and Barbera were placed in charge of MGM's animation division in late 1955; however, this proved short-lived as MGM closed the division in 1957. They subsequently teamed up to produce the series The Ruff & Reddy Show, under the name H-B Enterprises, soon changed to Hanna-Barbera Productions. By using the limited animation techniques, Hanna and Barbera could provide programming for networks at reduced cost.

By the late 1960s, Hanna-Barbera Productions had become the most successful television animation studio, producing hit television programs such as The Flintstones, The Jetsons, Jonny Quest, and Scooby-Doo, Where Are You!.

Later career
Hanna-Barbera had been a subsidiary of Taft Broadcasting (later Great American Communications) since 1967. The studio thrived until 1991, when it was sold to Turner Broadcasting. Hanna and Barbera stayed on as advisors and periodically worked on new Hanna-Barbera shows, including the What-a-Cartoon! series.

He served as creative consultant for the 1993 motion picture, Tom and Jerry: The Movie for Miramax Films and Film Roman. Hanna-Barbera, received eight Emmys, including the Governors Award of the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences in 1988.

Their strengths melded perfectly, critic Leonard Maltin wrote in his book Of Mice and Magic: A History of American Animated Cartoons. Barbera brought the comic gags and skilled drawing, while Hanna brought warmth and a keen sense of timing. Maltin wrote:

"This writing-directing team may hold a record for producing consistently superior cartoons using the same characters year after year - without a break or change in routine."
Hanna, who died in 2001, once said he was never a good artist but his partner could "capture mood and expression in a quick sketch better than anyone I've ever known."

After Hanna's death, Barbera remained active as an executive producer for Warner Bros. Animation on direct-to-video cartoon features as well as television series such as What's New, Scooby-Doo? and Tom and Jerry Tales. In the Tom and Jerry cartoon "The Mansion Cat" from 2000, Barbera was the houseowner's voice actor. He also wrote, co-storyboarded, co-directed and co-produced the theatrical Tom and Jerry short The KarateGuard in 2005, thus returning to his and Hanna's first successful cartoon format. His final animated project was the direct-to-video feature Tom and Jerry: A Nutcracker Tale, which came out on DVD in the U.S. on October 2, 2007.

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